Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 23 Oct 2014, 03:58

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2008
Posts: 12
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2008, 22:17
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 552
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 177 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2008, 23:01
fwl200 wrote:
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much


answer to your question : yes each diagonal will bisect each other in a rectangle, but that doesn not mean that its a square. For it to be square, diagonals should bisect each other and andgle between them should be 90.

Now lest solve the question

if x and y are the two sides. we have to find out 2(x+y)

statement 1 : [m]x^2 + y^2 = 100[/m] . there coudl be more than one possible solution for (x,y) not suff
statement 2 : xy = 48, again not suff

combine : we know (x+y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 +2xy
mean we can find out x+y... Suff

Answer C
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 735
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 104 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2008, 23:03
fwl200 wrote:
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much



for 1) consider a rectangle of 8x6 or a square of length 10/sqrt(2), both have diagonal of 10 , but perimeters are different.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jan 2008
Posts: 418
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 70 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 04:44
fwl200 wrote:
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much


1. Rectangular has two diagonals which have the same length ==> the rectangular must be square.
So the perimeter = 4*(10/2)*aqrt(2)

2. area = 48, hmm we can not determine the length and width of rectangular.

A is best answer.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Jul 2008
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 05:05
as said, the figure can be square too,
When combining 1 and 2 we can get the values by solving quadratic equations.
We get either 6 or 8.
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 283
Location: Milan
Schools: Wharton, LBS, UChicago, Kellogg MMM (Donald Jacobs Scholarship), Stanford, HBS
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 134 [0], given: 3

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 08:10
alpha_plus_gamma wrote:

for 1) consider a rectangle of 8x6 or a square of length 10/sqrt(2), both have diagonal of 10 , but perimeters are different.


The square of length 10/sqrt(2) would not have an area of 48 - would be 50.

Quote:
combine : we know (x+y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 +2xy


I can't get how you arrive to this equation combining the two statements, can you expand on this?
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 552
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 177 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 08:15
Paradosso wrote:
alpha_plus_gamma wrote:

for 1) consider a rectangle of 8x6 or a square of length 10/sqrt(2), both have diagonal of 10 , but perimeters are different.


The square of length 10/sqrt(2) would not have an area of 48 - would be 50.

Quote:
combine : we know (x+y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 +2xy


I can't get how you arrive to this equation combining the two statements, can you expand on this?


we dint arrive at this equation by combining, We already know its a formula.

we need to find out (x+y). from combining the two statements we know x^2+y^2 from (1) and xy from (2) soe we can find out (x+y) using above formula.
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 283
Location: Milan
Schools: Wharton, LBS, UChicago, Kellogg MMM (Donald Jacobs Scholarship), Stanford, HBS
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 134 [0], given: 3

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 08:21
You're right - I just got confused by the "^" which we have to use in place of standard math notation!

Thanks
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 552
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 177 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 08:23
Paradosso wrote:
You're right - I just got confused by the "^" which we have to use in place of standard math notation!

Thanks


I should have used maths formula function provided on this site
(x+y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 +2xy
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Mar 2008
Posts: 354
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 08:34
lexis wrote:
fwl200 wrote:
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much


1. Rectangular has two diagonals which have the same length ==> the rectangular must be square.
So the perimeter = 4*(10/2)*aqrt(2)

2. area = 48, hmm we can not determine the length and width of rectangular.

A is best answer.


Who say this -> Rectangular has two diagonals which have the same length ==> the rectangular must be square. ?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2008
Posts: 12
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 09:49
This comes from the 11th edition GMAT review book. The answer is C
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 735
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 104 [0], given: 0

Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 17:16
Paradosso wrote:
alpha_plus_gamma wrote:

for 1) consider a rectangle of 8x6 or a square of length 10/sqrt(2), both have diagonal of 10 , but perimeters are different.


The square of length 10/sqrt(2) would not have an area of 48 - would be 50.



We are intersted in perimeter, not in area.

Above I was trying to say that since there are (atleast) 2 possibilities that the the rectangle can be a 8x6 rectangle or a square with side 10/sqrt(2), the perimeters will be different and thus 1) alone won't be suffcient.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 1377
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 194 [0], given: 10

Reviews Badge
Re: DS: Geometry [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2008, 23:03
fwl200 wrote:
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p?

1. Each diagonal of rectangle Q has length 10

2. The area of rectangle Q is 48


----
Here's my question.
Doesn't "(1) Each diagonal"... imply that 2 diagonals cross in a square and that you can assume equal lengths of 5 for each bisected side? Graphically... \ and / = X


Thanks very much


p=2(a+b) ; a+b =?

1.sqrt(a^2+b^2) = 10
NS
2.ab= 48
NS
from 1 and 2 we can solve for a and b

C
Re: DS: Geometry   [#permalink] 09 Jul 2008, 23:03
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p Bunuel 11 16 Jul 2012, 03:56
Experts publish their posts in the topic If p is the perimeter of rectangle X, what is the value of gnothobiot 5 02 Nov 2011, 11:11
4 Experts publish their posts in the topic If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of p wininblue 9 05 Oct 2010, 01:11
If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of netcaesar 1 12 Jan 2008, 10:57
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of omomo 7 13 Nov 2005, 09:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

If p is the perimeter of rectangle Q, what is the value of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.