Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Aug 2014, 06:16

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

If P & Q are positive integers , what is the value of Q

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Apr 2007
Posts: 3
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

If P & Q are positive integers , what is the value of Q [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 01:56
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
If P & Q are positive integers , what is the value of Q ?

1. S is the product of two prime numbers greater than 10

2. S=P. Q3 ( Read as Q cube)


I know the answer but I am not convinced with the explaination.Can anybody of you please help.
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1816
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 03:03
(C) for me :)

We have:
p > 0 and q > 0

q=?

From 1
S = i * j where i > 10 and j > 10 and i, j are primes.

No relationship with P or Q....

INSUFF.

From 2
S = p*q^3

S could be anything and so is q...

INSUFF.

Both 1 and 2
p*q^3 = i*j

Implies that, as i & j are primes:
o p = i*j
o q^3 = 1 <=> q = 1

SUFF.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 179
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 04:22
Insufficient to answer the question..

Answer E
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 14 Jan 2007
Posts: 783
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 49 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 04:38
I agree with Fig.
Q should be 1 to satisfy the equation for all primes > 10.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2007
Posts: 550
Schools: MIT Sloan
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 08:31
i dont get the expln for C.

can someone pls explain ?
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1816
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 09:12
grad_mba wrote:
i dont get the expln for C.

can someone pls explain ?


S is composed of 2 prime integers.... q^3 cannot give a prime integer (ex 11^3, 13^3 are not prime integers), so it must be equal to 1 to not interfer and to make it possible for S to be a multiple of 2 primes integers, provided by p here.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2007
Posts: 550
Schools: MIT Sloan
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 12:28
Thx Fig ! :)

appreciate ur enthu in the forum evn after ur long done with ur GMAT !
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1816
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 12:38
grad_mba wrote:
Thx Fig ! :)

appreciate ur enthu in the forum evn after ur long done with ur GMAT !


U are welcome :)... Have u planned to pass the GMAT soon? :)
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2007
Posts: 550
Schools: MIT Sloan
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2007, 20:32
Fig wrote:
grad_mba wrote:
Thx Fig ! :)

appreciate ur enthu in the forum evn after ur long done with ur GMAT !


U are welcome :)... Have u planned to pass the GMAT soon? :)


yes yes .. gives me shivers though !
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jun 2007
Posts: 385
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2007, 11:14
This is abad question though. When combining the 2 statements we need to assume both are true. So by stmt 1 we are told that S is a product of 2 prime ints > 10. Using stmt2, q^3 cannot exist at all
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 328
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2007, 08:15
dahcrap wrote:
This is abad question though. When combining the 2 statements we need to assume both are true. So by stmt 1 we are told that S is a product of 2 prime ints > 10. Using stmt2, q^3 cannot exist at all


It can if q=1.

eg: S = 11 * 13

also S = (11* 13) * 1^3
S = P * Q^3

Hope this explains.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2006
Posts: 908
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 36 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2007, 12:51
Fig wrote:
(C) for me :)

We have:
p > 0 and q > 0

q=?

From 1
S = i * j where i > 10 and j > 10 and i, j are primes.

No relationship with P or Q....

INSUFF.

From 2
S = p*q^3

S could be anything and so is q...

INSUFF.

Both 1 and 2
p*q^3 = i*j

Implies that, as i & j are primes:
o p = i*j
o q^3 = 1 <=> q = 1

SUFF.



amitsamel wrote:
If P & Q are positive integers, what is the value of Q ?

1. S is the product of two prime numbers greater than 10
2. S = P . Q^3

I know the answer but I am not convinced with the explaination. Can anybody of you please help.



C. agree with Fig.

if P and Q were positive numbers, the answer would be E. but P and Q are integers, it makes sense Q is 1 and C is the answer.

I too was heading for E but realized the mistake immidiately.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 Jun 2007
Posts: 374
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2007, 19:23
I still don't see how it's C?

ST. 1 says S is the product of two prime numbers which are both >10
ST. 2 gives us S= P*Q^3

which means P is a prime>10
and Q^3 is a prime>10

hence Q^3 needs to be a perfect cube + a prime> 10
perfect cubes >10 are 27, 64, 125, none of which are primes
there is no perfect cube which is also a prime> 10
how can we take Q to be equal to 1, that would make Q^3= 1 and 1<10

the answer has to be E.
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 2593
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 183 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2007, 19:51
Fig wrote:
grad_mba wrote:
i dont get the expln for C.

can someone pls explain ?


S is composed of 2 prime integers.... q^3 cannot give a prime integer (ex 11^3, 13^3 are not prime integers), so it must be equal to 1 to not interfer and to make it possible for S to be a multiple of 2 primes integers, provided by p here.



Ah ok now I see. I thought S1 was sayin that S is the product of 2 primes that are both greater than 10.


Was like how can this be C?
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2007
Posts: 584
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Tricky DS [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2007, 19:57
Well it got me nuts first. But finally managed C.
Fig gr8 explanation.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 Jun 2007
Posts: 374
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2007, 20:27
GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
Fig wrote:
grad_mba wrote:
i dont get the expln for C.

can someone pls explain ?


S is composed of 2 prime integers.... q^3 cannot give a prime integer (ex 11^3, 13^3 are not prime integers), so it must be equal to 1 to not interfer and to make it possible for S to be a multiple of 2 primes integers, provided by p here.



Ah ok now I see. I thought S1 was sayin that S is the product of 2 primes that are both greater than 10.


Was like how can this be C?


exactly, I am not sure why everyone is agreeing that Q is 1 when ST. 1& 2 implies clearly that Q^3 must be a prime> 10.
1 is not a prime and it is not greater than 10. :shock:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Aug 2007
Posts: 255
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2007, 07:42
Totally agree with Fig, it is C

since prime number cannot be equal to the number n^3 because it says it is prime...

however, Sometimes I dont understand what is saying the question,
can smn give me advice how to cope with it???
  [#permalink] 11 Sep 2007, 07:42
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic If p and q are positive integers, what is the value of p/q^2 civi83 1 17 Feb 2014, 22:43
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic If P, Q, and R are positive integers, what is the remainder Pansi 3 27 Oct 2012, 18:48
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic If p and q are positive integers, what is the value of q? Stiv 1 28 Jun 2012, 05:56
if p and q are positive integers, what is the value of q? 1) andreasonlinegr 5 03 Oct 2008, 11:27
Experts publish their posts in the topic If P & Q are positive integers, what is the value of Q ? GMAT TIGER 12 28 Nov 2007, 00:55
Display posts from previous: Sort by

If P & Q are positive integers , what is the value of Q

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.