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If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as

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If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2012, 07:21
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If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

(1) s is a factor of 100
(2) r is a factor of 100
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2012, 09:02
IMO it is A, if the denominator is a factor of 100 then it could be 1; 2; 5; 10; 20.. if you divide all the positive integer by these number you will have a finite decimal result.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2012, 12:18
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Finite decimals are decimals which end. eg 0.5,0.25, etc. Non finite are numbers like 1/3,1/6 etc ie 0.33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333.......... or 0.66666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666..........

1)S is a factor of 100. So S cannot have more than two 2s and two 5s. Any number divisible be 2 or 5 gives a finite decimal. Since R and S are both positive integers, there can be no 0s in the decimal places either. So Sufficient

2)R is a factor of 100. Cant say anything form this. R can be 1. 1/10 is finite. 1/3 is not. Insufficient.

Answer is hence A.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 23 Oct 2012, 06:59
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asveaass wrote:
If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

1) s is a factor of 100
2) r is a factor of 100

I don't understand the answer explanation in the OG, could someone please explain in detail?


THEORY:

Reduced fraction \(\frac{a}{b}\) (meaning that fraction is already reduced to its lowest term) can be expressed as terminating decimal if and only \(b\) (denominator) is of the form \(2^n5^m\), where \(m\) and \(n\) are non-negative integers. For example: \(\frac{7}{250}\) is a terminating decimal \(0.028\), as \(250\) (denominator) equals to \(2*5^3\). Fraction \(\frac{3}{30}\) is also a terminating decimal, as \(\frac{3}{30}=\frac{1}{10}\) and denominator \(10=2*5\).

Note that if denominator already has only 2-s and/or 5-s then it doesn't matter whether the fraction is reduced or not.

For example \(\frac{x}{2^n5^m}\), (where x, n and m are integers) will always be terminating decimal.

(We need reducing in case when we have the prime in denominator other then 2 or 5 to see whether it could be reduced. For example fraction \(\frac{6}{15}\) has 3 as prime in denominator and we need to know if it can be reduced.)

Questions testing this concept:
does-the-decimal-equivalent-of-p-q-where-p-and-q-are-89566.html
any-decimal-that-has-only-a-finite-number-of-nonzero-digits-101964.html
if-a-b-c-d-and-e-are-integers-and-p-2-a3-b-and-q-2-c3-d5-e-is-p-q-a-terminating-decimal-125789.html
700-question-94641.html
is-r-s2-is-a-terminating-decimal-91360.html
pl-explain-89566.html
which-of-the-following-fractions-88937.html

BACK TO THE ORIGINAL QUESTION:
If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

(1) s is a factor of 100. Factors of 100 are: 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50 and 100. All these numbers are of the form \(2^n5^m\) (for example 1=2^0*5^0, 2=2^1*5^0, ...), therefore no matter what is the value of r, r/s will always will be terminating decimal. Sufficient.

(2) r is a factor of 100. We need to know about the denominator. Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2013, 00:25
you rock bunuel, your explanations are awesome.. thanks a lot for this one!
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2013, 10:12
But it has been said the 'decimal with finite number of non-zero digits'. Now if we take 2/50 then it will be 0.04, which means its a finite decimal but definitely it does not have all the non-zero digits after decimal point. So, can anybody explain?
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 04 May 2014, 10:31
Hi Bunuel,

Speaking from a prime perspective, I could factor "100" into prime factors and since I get 2^2 and 5^2, that should suffice in coming up with the right answer, correct? I don't need to pull up every single factors - right?

If the denominator had ANY other primes then it would NOT be a terminating decimal. Is that correct?
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 05 May 2014, 01:31
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halloanupam wrote:
But it has been said the 'decimal with finite number of non-zero digits'. Now if we take 2/50 then it will be 0.04, which means its a finite decimal but definitely it does not have all the non-zero digits after decimal point. So, can anybody explain?


0.04 has finite number of non-zero digits: 4 is not followed by any non-zero digit.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 05 May 2014, 01:35
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Hi Bunuel,

Speaking from a prime perspective, I could factor "100" into prime factors and since I get 2^2 and 5^2, that should suffice in coming up with the right answer, correct? I don't need to pull up every single factors - right?

If the denominator had ANY other primes then it would NOT be a terminating decimal. Is that correct?


Not entirely. The denominator can have some other primes as well but if those primes can be reduced the fraction still would be terminating. For example, consider fraction 3/6. The denominator has 3 in it, but it ca be reduced to get 3/6=1/2=0.5.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2014, 22:28
Bunuel wrote:
asveaass wrote:
If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

1) s is a factor of 100
2) r is a factor of 100

I don't understand the answer explanation in the OG, could someone please explain in detail?


THEORY:

Reduced fraction \(\frac{a}{b}\) (meaning that fraction is already reduced to its lowest term) can be expressed as terminating decimal if and only \(b\) (denominator) is of the form \(2^n5^m\), where \(m\) and \(n\) are non-negative integers. For example: \(\frac{7}{250}\) is a terminating decimal \(0.028\), as \(250\) (denominator) equals to \(2*5^3\). Fraction \(\frac{3}{30}\) is also a terminating decimal, as \(\frac{3}{30}=\frac{1}{10}\) and denominator \(10=2*5\).

Note that if denominator already has only 2-s and/or 5-s then it doesn't matter whether the fraction is reduced or not.

For example \(\frac{x}{2^n5^m}\), (where x, n and m are integers) will always be terminating decimal.

(We need reducing in case when we have the prime in denominator other then 2 or 5 to see whether it could be reduced. For example fraction \(\frac{6}{15}\) has 3 as prime in denominator and we need to know if it can be reduced.)



Why is it then 130/13 or 121/11 would give finite ... infact they properly divide...
Can someone please help ?
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2014, 00:28
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ani781 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
asveaass wrote:
If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

1) s is a factor of 100
2) r is a factor of 100

I don't understand the answer explanation in the OG, could someone please explain in detail?


THEORY:

Reduced fraction \(\frac{a}{b}\) (meaning that fraction is already reduced to its lowest term) can be expressed as terminating decimal if and only \(b\) (denominator) is of the form \(2^n5^m\), where \(m\) and \(n\) are non-negative integers. For example: \(\frac{7}{250}\) is a terminating decimal \(0.028\), as \(250\) (denominator) equals to \(2*5^3\). Fraction \(\frac{3}{30}\) is also a terminating decimal, as \(\frac{3}{30}=\frac{1}{10}\) and denominator \(10=2*5\).

Note that if denominator already has only 2-s and/or 5-s then it doesn't matter whether the fraction is reduced or not.

For example \(\frac{x}{2^n5^m}\), (where x, n and m are integers) will always be terminating decimal.

(We need reducing in case when we have the prime in denominator other then 2 or 5 to see whether it could be reduced. For example fraction \(\frac{6}{15}\) has 3 as prime in denominator and we need to know if it can be reduced.)



Why is it then 130/13 or 121/11 would give finite ... infact they properly divide...
Can someone please help ?


The rule above is for reduced fraction \(\frac{a}{b}\) (meaning that fraction is already reduced to its lowest term). When you reduce 130/13 to the lowest term you get 10 and when you reduce 121/11 you get 11: 10/(2^0*5^0) and 11/(2^0*5^0) respectively.

Check the links in my post above to practice more on this type of questions.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2014, 01:08
A, of course. I had got it as soon as I saw it. This is a very simple problem probably fetched from RS
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If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 17 Nov 2014, 18:56
Bunuel wrote:

THEORY:

Reduced fraction \(\frac{a}{b}\) (meaning that fraction is already reduced to its lowest term) can be expressed as terminating decimal if and only \(b\) (denominator) is of the form \(2^n5^m\), where \(m\) and \(n\) are non-negative integers. For example: \(\frac{7}{250}\) is a terminating decimal \(0.028\), as \(250\) (denominator) equals to \(2*5^3\). Fraction \(\frac{3}{30}\) is also a terminating decimal, as \(\frac{3}{30}=\frac{1}{10}\) and denominator \(10=2*5\).

Note that if denominator already has only 2-s and/or 5-s then it doesn't matter whether the fraction is reduced or not.

For example \(\frac{x}{2^n5^m}\), (where x, n and m are integers) will always be terminating decimal.


Hi Bunuel,

Just looking for some clarification, in the highlighted text above, please correct me if I am wrong, by including the word "and" did you mean that if the denominator contains only 2's or only 5's then too the fraction is a terminating decimal? In other words, the denominator doesn't need to contain, both - 2's & 5's!

Thank you!
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 17 Nov 2014, 22:36
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Yes, examples such as \(\frac{17}{2^7}\), \(\frac{31}{5^{18}}\), and \(\frac{21}{[(2^5)(5^7)]}\) are all terminating decimals.

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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2014, 11:44
dabral wrote:
dmmk

Yes, examples such as \(\frac{17}{2^7}\), \(\frac{31}{5^{18}}\), and \(\frac{21}{[(2^5)(5^7)]}\) are all terminating decimals.

Dabral


Thank you dabral :cool :-D
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 03 Dec 2014, 10:12
Bunuel wrote:
russ9 wrote:
Hi Bunuel,

Speaking from a prime perspective, I could factor "100" into prime factors and since I get 2^2 and 5^2, that should suffice in coming up with the right answer, correct? I don't need to pull up every single factors - right?

If the denominator had ANY other primes then it would NOT be a terminating decimal. Is that correct?


Not entirely. The denominator can have some other primes as well but if those primes can be reduced the fraction still would be terminating. For example, consider fraction 3/6. The denominator has 3 in it, but it ca be reduced to get 3/6=1/2=0.5.


Bunuel I did not understand from your post whether we can have other primes in denominator? Can you pls. repeat?
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 03 Dec 2014, 22:50
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For a fraction to be a terminating decimal the only primes that can be present in the denominator are 2 and 5, and this only applies to reduced form of the fraction. If there is any other prime in the denominator, then the fraction will be non-terminating. For example, \(\frac{21}{[(2^4)(5^3)(11^2)]}\), \(\frac{11}{[(5^6)(7^3)]}\), and \(\frac{22}{(7^4)}\) are all non-terminating decimals.

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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 03 Dec 2014, 23:35
dabral wrote:
Ergenekon

For a fraction to be a terminating decimal the only primes that can be present in the denominator are 2 and 5, and this only applies to reduced form of the fraction. If there is any other prime in the denominator, then the fraction will be non-terminating. For example, \(\frac{21}{[(2^4)(5^3)(11^2)]}\), \(\frac{11}{[(5^6)(7^3)]}\), and \(\frac{22}{(7^4)}\) are all non-terminating decimals.

Dabral


Thanks Dabral. Got it now.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2015, 16:14
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Hello, what if r is the same as s? Then we don't have a finite decimal but an integer. Then A should not be sufficient as the answer can be a decimal or an integer. Am I wrong in my thinking?
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2015, 02:15
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Hello, what if r is the same as s? Then we don't have a finite decimal but an integer. Then A should not be sufficient as the answer can be a decimal or an integer. Am I wrong in my thinking?


An integer IS a decimal with a finite number of nonzero digits. For example, integer 51 has 2 (finite) number of digits.
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Re: If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as   [#permalink] 12 Mar 2015, 02:15

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16 Experts publish their posts in the topic If r and s are positive integers, is r/s an integer? BANON 14 23 Feb 2012, 07:13
if r and s are positive integers , is r/s an integer? harshavmrg 1 25 Jun 2011, 21:58
If r and s are positive integers, is r/s an integer? 1) agdimple333 4 23 Apr 2011, 14:34
7 Experts publish their posts in the topic If r and s are positive integers, is r/s an integer? chicagocubsrule 17 10 Nov 2009, 14:24
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as joemama142000 11 22 Mar 2006, 16:13
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If r and s are positive integers, can the fraction r/s be expressed as

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