Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Oct 2014, 04:42

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2003
Posts: 9
Location: CT
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2004, 22:04
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple of 5 in S?

1) if x is in S, then x+5 is in S
2) if x is in S, then x-5 is in S
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 01 Dec 2003
Posts: 35
Location: infront of my LCD
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2004, 23:37
C?

1: if 5 is in S, so is 10, so is 15 and so on...20,25 because x+5
not suff because it only goes up the positive line

2: if 5 is in S, so is 0, -5, -10 and so on because x-5
not suff because it only goes down the negative line

put then to together.

5,10,15...and 5, 0, -5, -10, -15...

and you get all multiples of 5
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 26 Dec 2003
Posts: 227
Location: India
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2004, 18:40
:band
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2003
Posts: 9
Location: CT
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

correction [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2004, 18:44
i apologize, but in my previous posting i posted the answer was E,
the actual anser is C....anyone know why?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 26 Dec 2003
Posts: 227
Location: India
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2004, 18:49
I dont think C is correct , let set={5,6,10,15,19,23,25,10000000001} and let x=10 then (x+5) 15 is in Set and (x-5) 5 is in set but the set doesnt contain all the multiples of 5.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Dec 2003
Posts: 47
Location: LA
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Hi [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2004, 19:10
What is the source of this question? It's very unclear...

If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple of 5 in S?

1) if x is in S, then x+5 is in S
2) if x is in S, then x-5 is in S

This question could be interpreted in a number of ways....

First, I picked E. 1) Cause let's say that x is 5, then 5 and 10 will be in the set. Not sufficient. 2) Let's say that x is 5, then 5, and 0 will be in the set. Not sufficient. 3) Again, let's use 5.. then 5, 10, 0 will be in the set. Not sufficient. Also, you can use other numbers that are not mutliples of 5.

To accurately get the answer C, then the question needs to be reworded to something like this... For every member of set S (called x), then x+5 is in S. Or something to that "ETS verbage" stuff. The question as it is, implies that x is only one member of the set, and you use the +5 or -5 rule to only one member, not all the members.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Nov 2003
Posts: 356
Location: Illinois
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Hi [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2004, 19:33
gmatanh wrote:
What is the source of this question? It's very unclear...

If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple of 5 in S?

1) if x is in S, then x+5 is in S
2) if x is in S, then x-5 is in S

This question could be interpreted in a number of ways....

First, I picked E. 1) Cause let's say that x is 5, then 5 and 10 will be in the set. Not sufficient. 2) Let's say that x is 5, then 5, and 0 will be in the set. Not sufficient. 3) Again, let's use 5.. then 5, 10, 0 will be in the set. Not sufficient. Also, you can use other numbers that are not mutliples of 5.

To accurately get the answer C, then the question needs to be reworded to something like this... For every member of set S (called x), then x+5 is in S. Or something to that "ETS verbage" stuff. The question as it is, implies that x is only one member of the set, and you use the +5 or -5 rule to only one member, not all the members.


I am sorry but I do not agree with you. The given wording of the problem is accurate.

When the statement says that if x is in S, then x+5 is in S, then you are invited to think recursively.

We have already been given that 5 is in S, so based on the first statement 5, 10, 15, ..... infinite all are members of S. Similarly the second statment also apllies. The answer should be C.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Jan 2004
Posts: 19
Location: KZ
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2004, 07:04
Dudes, my answer is A.
Cause the multiples of 5 are 5, 10, 15, ect. In other words, set of POSITIVE numbers only. The way of thinking stays the same. :!:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Nov 2003
Posts: 356
Location: Illinois
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2004, 07:14
Solo wrote:
Dudes, my answer is A.
Cause the multiples of 5 are 5, 10, 15, ect. In other words, set of POSITIVE numbers only. The way of thinking stays the same. :!:


I disagree. The multiple of any integer includes 0, -ve integers and +ve integers.

If you are interested in more sofisticated defination, here it is.

The set of all multiples of an integer a will be denoted by

{ m in Z | m = aq for some q in Z }. where Z is a set of integers {....-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3,......}
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2004
Posts: 2
Location: Australia
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2004, 15:40
It's news to me that 0 is a multiple of 5
This was not the case where I went to school

Though this expains the answer to one of the Kaplin
maths probems in the 2004 GMAT book
Question 13 in the maths section practice test states that 0 is a multiple
of 5

I've just got to get out more :?
_________________

Don't die wondering

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 28 Oct 2003
Posts: 503
Location: 55405
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2004, 15:47
Quote:
This was not the case where I went to school


Were you taught by a pack of wolves?

http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/60913.html
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 28 Oct 2003
Posts: 503
Location: 55405
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2004, 15:48
That was too snarky by half. Sorry.

The stress of my looming test is getting to me.

calnhob's answer is spot-on, IMO.
  [#permalink] 21 Jan 2004, 15:48
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
If S is a set of integers 5 is in S, is every multiple of 5 fozzzy 0 08 Sep 2013, 00:22
3 Experts publish their posts in the topic If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple o summer101 6 10 Jun 2013, 04:33
8 Experts publish their posts in the topic If P is a set of integers and 3 is in P, is every positive Caffmeister 7 02 Jul 2010, 09:24
Experts publish their posts in the topic Each term of set T is a multiple of 5. Is standard deviation Jivana 8 04 Sep 2009, 17:29
Number properties - is 0 a multiple of every integer? thinkblue 5 30 Sep 2008, 22:06
Display posts from previous: Sort by

If S is a set of integers and 5 is in S, is every multiple

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.