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If the claims of coastal nations to 200-mile territorial

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If the claims of coastal nations to 200-mile territorial [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 13:22
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A
B
C
D
E

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10. If the claims of coastal nations to 200-mile territorial seas were accepted on a worldwide basis, more than thirty per cent of the world’s ocean area would come under the jurisdiction of one or other national states.


(A) one or other national states
(B) one or another national state
(C) one or the other national state
(D) some or another of the national states
(E) each and every national state
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 13:30
(A) one or other national states PLURAL CONFUSION
(B) one or another national state ANOTHER NATIONAL STATE INCORRECT
(C) one or the other national state CORRECT!
(D) some or another of the national states AGAIN PLURAL CONFUSION SOME OR ANOTHER INCORRECT USAGE
(E) each and every national state EACH AND EVERY NATIONAL STATE CONFUSES THAT COLLECTIVELY THEY CONTRIBUTE TO 30%.

C seems correct.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 13:48
I'd go with B. Definite article "the" in C is too specific as to which state's jurisdiction the ocean's area will be under
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 14:25
B.
I think other is specific. Here the intended meaning is for another I think. Other is also used when 2 entities are involved. Here more than 2 countries are involved.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 15:23
Paul wrote:
I'd go with B. Definite article "the" in C is too specific as to which state's jurisdiction the ocean's area will be under


Paul,
Don't you think saying "the other state" is specific because with the jurisdiction passed these states would definitely have the area of the sea under their jurisdiction.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 16:44
I'ld go with C.
Can someone more knowledgeable provide an explanation?

Honghu?
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 18:49
"one- another" is correct

"each -other" is correct and not "one- other"

therefore "B"
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 19:50
C it is

one or the other is the right idiom, notice the correct usage of state at the end as oposed to states in choice A
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 20:16
I think it is C. One or the other is the correct idiom.

OA please!!
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 20:41
The problem with C is that it says "the other state". For one, this could either say that there is one specific other state to which the ocean's water belongs to but there is no such allusion in the text. For two, C could otherwise assume that there are only 2 states, X or Y, to which the ocean's water could belong to and this is wrong. Either way, I find the indefinite structure "one or another X" more appropriate in this case.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 21:07
I am unable to decide between (A) and (B)... What is wrong with (A).. :roll:
anybody help...

(C) is definitely wrong....

from my Notes (Anand's explaination..)

Generally, the other means the second one. In other words, we can only use the other one when we are talking about only two things, such as our eyes, feet, ears, hands, or legs.

For example, "I have two sisters. One is a doctor, and the other one is an artist."
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 21:22
Paul wrote:
The problem with C is that it says "the other state". For one, this could either say that there is one specific other state to which the ocean's water belongs to but there is no such allusion in the text. For two, C could otherwise assume that there are only 2 states, X or Y, to which the ocean's water could belong to and this is wrong. Either way, I find the indefinite structure "one or another X" more appropriate in this case.


paul,

Agree with your explanation. Thats the problem sometimes with sentence correction..sometimes it is just so intuitive and yet isn't correct.

Thanks for the explanation.

Also, would teh One or the other...always be true for two given/stated/assumed choices only?
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2005, 21:34
jpv Excellent explanation. I thought of C initially but caught on the wrong foot.
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Re: SC#10 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 04:48
Difficulty with (A) and (B), but i choose (B).

(B) means '...One [state] or another national state'. (state and state)
(A) means '...one [state] or other national states'. (state and states -dosen't sound correct in my opinion)
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Re: SC#10 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 08:06
I agree with Paul that (B) is correct.

(A) one or other national states
One states is wrong

(B) one or another national state
Correct. A better way to say it would be "one national state or another."

(C) one or the other national state
One or the other can only be used when there are only two states.
(Which one is "the other"?)

(D) some or another of the national states
Some is plaural, another is single.
It could be right to say "some states or other", I think.

(E) each and every national state
Changes the meaning.

(B)

Last edited by HongHu on 04 Mar 2005, 08:38, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 08:33
I am used to hearing "one or the other" but not "one or the another" and hence I selected C. In fact I have never heard "one or the another".

But I guess I am wrong - I shouldn't trust my ear!
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 08:36
One or another, not one or the another. ;)

Yes we often hear "one or the other", but we probably also often hear "one something or another", just here it was changed to "one or another something." ;)
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 09:34
I also chose "C"....OA is "B"....thx all
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2005, 13:38
B.
one or other - means between first or second that is out of two choices
one or another - between multiple choices not restricted to two
  [#permalink] 04 Mar 2005, 13:38
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