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Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have

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Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2005, 13:52
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Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have been found all around the globe, but they have been found in the greatest density in geologically stable regions. This relatively greater abundance of securely identified crater in geologically stable regions must be explained by the lower rates of destructive geophysical processes in those regions.
The conclusion is properly drawn if which one of the following is assumed?

(A) A meteorite that strikes exactly the same spot as an earlier meteorite will obliterate all traces of the earlier impact.
(B) Rates of destructive geophysical processes within any given region vary markedly throughout geological time.
(C) The rate at which the Earth is struck by meteorites has greatly increased in geologically recent times.
(D) Actual meteorite impacts have been scattered fairly evenly over the Earth’s surface in the course of Earth’s geological history.
(E) The Earth’s geologically stable regions have been studied more intensively by geologists than have its less stable regions.


:shock:
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2005, 16:06
Choose D.

The stem says that impact craters have been found all around the world but they are more dense in areas which are not affected by the destructive forces (earthquakes etc). So the assumption is that meteorite impacts occur fairly evenly however some impacts survive the course of time while others dont as they are destroyed by destructive geophysical processes.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2005, 21:51
I will go with A on this :roll:
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Re [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2005, 23:21
According to me it is A.
Pls post the Oa to clarify my explaination.
The simple basis for the same is that I beleiev it is mentyione that the stable places have less geo-physical destruction and so ought to be placement of same meteriote without further causing geographical damage
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2005, 05:02
one more vote for D .

Gayathri had explained it well.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2005, 09:33
Thanks for your answers,

OA is "D" ..........





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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 05:47
Gayathri,

I am not following your reasoning.From the question,I see the following:
Evidence:Metrorites smash highly in geologically stable regions.
Conclusion:There is an abundance of crater in geologically stable region. This usually happens when the rate of destructive geophysical process is low.
++++

From the above I see:Metrorites smashing=Destructive
Thus,Destructive geophysical process such as metrorites smashing is common in geologically stable region.How can we consider this[Destructive geophysical process] to be low as the evidence says otherwise?

I would appreciate if you can clarify further.Rgds,

Anna
gayathri wrote:
Choose D.

The stem says that impact craters have been found all around the world but they are more dense in areas which are not affected by the destructive forces (earthquakes etc). So the assumption is that meteorite impacts occur fairly evenly however some impacts survive the course of time while others dont as they are destroyed by destructive geophysical processes.

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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 13:46
Eventhought I choose a wrong ans (B) but Gayatri's explanation is simple and straight.


Rama you are intermixing two diff phenomenons, meteor crashing and destructive physical .... .Also, it is not mentioned that metoer crashing is a destructive thing (this is pressing too much though) anyway, I believe maybe gayatri can add something to the explanation.

[u]Incase anyone is interested, I would like to mention how I reached (B)[/u]
In my case, just by making a wrong assumtion I logically concluded my ans as (B) since it is mentioned that [b]lower rates [/b]of destructive geophysical processes in those regions are the reason of more meteor crashing and even I made the wrong assumption that these 2 events are interrelated i.e. lower rates of destructive geophysical processes result in more meteor crashing and a greater rates of destructive geophysical processes result in less meteor Crashing and hence Now if (B) is true then we are actually saying overall there had been varying rates of destructive geophysical processes but since this reagon has the lower rates of destructive geophysical processes therefore more meteor crashing (while at the same time other reagon must have exp higher rates of destructive geophysical processes at some time and hence fewer meteor crashing sites)
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Re: CR - Impact craters caused by meteorites [#permalink] New post 30 May 2011, 08:10
+1 for D
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Re: CR - Impact craters caused by meteorites [#permalink] New post 30 May 2011, 11:36
Clearly D!
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Re: Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2013, 01:01
GMATPIPO wrote:
Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have been found all around the globe, but they have been found in the greatest density in geologically stable regions. This relatively greater abundance of securely identified crater in geologically stable regions must be explained by the lower rates of destructive geophysical processes in those regions.
The conclusion is properly drawn if which one of the following is assumed?

(A) A meteorite that strikes exactly the same spot as an earlier meteorite will obliterate all traces of the earlier impact.
(B) Rates of destructive geophysical processes within any given region vary markedly throughout geological time.
(C) The rate at which the Earth is struck by meteorites has greatly increased in geologically recent times.
(D) Actual meteorite impacts have been scattered fairly evenly over the Earth’s surface in the course of Earth’s geological history.
(E) The Earth’s geologically stable regions have been studied more intensively by geologists than have its less stable regions.


:shock:


IMO: D

Premise: more crater in stable regions
Premise: lower rates of destructive geophysical process in stable regions.
Conclusion: more crater in stable regions because of lower rates of destructive geophysical process.

Assumption: meteorites impacted evenly both the stable regions and unstable regions. If meteorites impacted more in stables regions ==> more craters ==> the conclusion fails.

D clearly states the conclusion.
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Re: Impact craters caused by meteorites smashing into Earth have   [#permalink] 18 Apr 2013, 01:01
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