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In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding

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In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2011, 15:44
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In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of “coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures and avoidance of dominant individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that, for any species of monkey,
crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats. Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?
A. All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions.
B. In the studies of rats, nondominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions.
C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.
D. Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were.
E. Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.

How come the answer is C? Can someone please explain the reasoning?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2011, 22:12
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Premise: Experimentation done on Rhesus monkeys
Conclusion:
For any species of monkey,crowding DOES NOT increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats.

The argument is a weak one as the conclusion does not follow directly from the premises - The argument generalizes results found on Rhesus monkeys with what will happen to all other species monkeys.

C strengthens the argument by stating that Rhesus monkeys are the most aggressive ones; other species will not be any more aggressive. Hence the findings on Rhesus monkeys is the worst case scenario :).

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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2011, 16:25
Difficult one becasue only C and E options are little relevant to conclusion.

I'll pick E because increase in instances of “coping” behavior shows that few of the rhesus monkeys were showing submissive gestures to avoid the fight and hence less attacks.

Hope it helps!
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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2011, 00:23
Thanks crick20002002. It all makes sense now.
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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2011, 03:39
C is the answer because

If Monkeys are the most aggressive creatures then none can attack monkeys and so the monkeys will not become extinct
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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2011, 08:06
Ans-C,

The conclusion is-Therefore it is not likely that, for any species of monkey,
crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats.

C.Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do-Option C indicates that Rhesus are those species of monkey which respond with agression the most but these species did not show much agression in crowded conditions. Hence it implies that other species would also not respond that much.
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Re: Monkeys & Rats [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2011, 22:52
Yes I agree with Babzsn84. That helps explain why C is the answer. If the experiments were performed on the most aggressive monkey species and yet this monkey species was found to be less aggressive than rats, in general, then the conclusion that monkeys, in general, are less aggressive than rats in the 'crowding' scenario is strengthened.
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Re: In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2014, 01:03
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Re: In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2014, 09:52
1. PREMISE---Studies of rats found that crowding increases the number of attacks among the animals significantly.
2. PREMISE-----In recent experiments INVOLVING rhesus monkeys, attacks did not become any more frequent.
CONCLUSION------ It is not likely that, for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats.
ASSUMPTION-----
1. In rhesus monkeys, Attack BEHAVIOR is more prevelant than other MONKEYS.
2. Other monkeys will not exceed the rhesus monkeys in attack/aggressive behavior in crowding....

C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.CORRECT
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In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2014, 19:40
In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of “coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures(signals) and avoidance of dominant individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that, for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats. Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?
A. All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions.
B. In the studies of rats, non-dominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions.
C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.
D. Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were.
E. Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.
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Re: In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2014, 21:24
Expert's post
Raihanuddin wrote:
In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of “coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures(signals) and avoidance of dominant individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that, for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats. Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?
A. All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions.
B. In the studies of rats, non-dominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions.
C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.
D. Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were.
E. Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.


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In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2014, 06:27
Although i got it wrong,on closer inspection found out that the conclusion is for all species of monkeys which makes C the clearest choice.C mentions the fact that Rhesus monkeys are the most reactive to the widest range of stimuli.So it can be interpreted as:
If Rhesus monkeys being the most reactive DO NOT respond to overcrowding by being more violent,then it is likely that no other species of monkeys will react to overcrowding.Therefore it strengthens the argument by clearing out an underlying assumption that behaviour of rhesus monkeys can be extrapolated to all monkey species
Hope this kind of explains C.
In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding   [#permalink] 19 Oct 2014, 06:27
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