Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 19 Apr 2014, 07:52

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 649
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 24 [1] , given: 0

GMAT Tests User
In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2008, 13:52
1
This post received
KUDOS
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

64% (02:47) correct 35% (01:08) wrong based on 14 sessions
In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks
among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys
were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of
“coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures and avoidance of dominant
individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that,
for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in
rats.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

A. All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions.

B. In the studies of rats, nondominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions.

C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.

D. Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were.

E. Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.

Please explain your answers.
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 77
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [1] , given: 1

Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2008, 23:12
1
This post received
KUDOS
A for me
2 KUDOS received
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 17 Nov 2007
Posts: 3599
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Other
Schools: Chicago (Booth) - Class of 2011
GMAT 1: 750 Q50 V40
Followers: 326

Kudos [?]: 1574 [2] , given: 354

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2008, 06:05
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
C

In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks
among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys
were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of
“coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures and avoidance of dominant
individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that,
for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in
rats.

The assumption: Result for rhesus monkeys means the same result for any species of monkey

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.
Only C relates Rhesus monkeys to any other monkeys
_________________

NEW! GMAT ToolKit 2 (iOS) / GMAT ToolKit (Android) - The must have GMAT prep app | PrepGame

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
Joined: 21 Dec 2007
Posts: 99
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 14 [1] , given: 0

Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2008, 07:41
1
This post received
KUDOS
walkers explanation seems correct..whats the OA?
Director
Director
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 649
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2008, 08:31
Correct. OA is C.
Director
Director
Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Posts: 793
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 97 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2008, 23:12
Conclusion: For any species of monkey, increase in crowding wasn’t caused aggression as significantly as was seen in rats.

A. All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions. [Argument deals with crowding vs. aggression behavior. - This is irrelevant to the argument.]

B. In the studies of rats, nondominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions. [The argument deals with any species of monkeys and with crowding vs. aggression behavior. - This is irrelevant to the argument.]

C. Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do. (Hold it)

D. Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were. [This is not about individual monkeys in experiment – Eliminate it]


E. Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.[This argument is not about coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys – eliminate it]

Answer: C
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 957
WE 1: 3.5 yrs IT
WE 2: 2.5 yrs Retail chain
Followers: 48

Kudos [?]: 625 [0], given: 40

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2010, 04:10
This is was tough for me. I marked E as C makes a comparison b/w rhesus monkey with other monkeys while the argument seems not to :(
VP
VP
Joined: 15 Jul 2004
Posts: 1474
Schools: Wharton (R2 - submitted); HBS (R2 - submitted); IIMA (admitted for 1 year PGPX)
Followers: 14

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 13

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Monkey behavior :) [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2010, 09:37
ykaiim wrote:
This is was tough for me. I marked E as C makes a comparison b/w rhesus monkey with other monkeys while the argument seems not to :(


Quote:
Therefore it is not likely that,
for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in
rats.


Read the stem carefully - it says- ANY species of monkey - this should immediately alert you that from ONE species of monkey (rhesus), the author is generalizing to ALL species of monkeys. Thus there should be something so generally true or so all-encompassing about rhesus monkey that the generalization should hold to other monkeys as well.
2 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 1696
Followers: 388

Kudos [?]: 1535 [2] , given: 25

GMAT Tests User
Re: In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2013, 10:16
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
eyunni wrote:
In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding increases the number of attacks among the animals significantly. But in recent experiments in which rhesus monkeys were placed in crowded conditions, although there was an increase in instances of “coping” behavior—such as submissive gestures and avoidance of dominant individuals—attacks did not become any more frequent. Therefore it is not likely that, for any species of monkey, crowding increases aggression as significantly as was seen in rats.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?
(A) All the observed forms of coping behavior can be found among rhesus monkeys living in uncrowded conditions.
(B) In the studies of rats, nondominant individuals were found to increasingly avoid dominant individuals when the animals were in crowded conditions.
(C) Rhesus monkeys respond with aggression to a wider range of stimuli than any other monkeys do.
(D) Some individual monkeys in the experiment were involved in significantly more attacks than the other monkeys were.
(E) Some of the coping behavior displayed by rhesus monkeys is similar to behavior rhesus monkeys use to bring to an end an attack that has begun.

fameatop wrote:
Hi Mike, I am not able to understand the logic presented in option (although i got the logic in Stimuli) & how come option (C) strengthens the argument? Can you kindly dispel my confusion. Waiting eagerly for your valuable inputs. Regards, Fame

First, I will say I find it a little unusual that no one seems to be able to identify the source of this question. Hmmm.

Because you ask about (C), I will simply address this. The argument is very tricky. First, it gives us evidence about rats. Then it gives us seemingly contradictory evidence about rhesus monkeys. Finally, it draws a conclusion, not about rhesus monkeys, but about all monkeys. Clearly, there's some important unstated link between what we know about rhesus monkeys specifically, and what we can conclude about all monkeys. Always look for these unstated links --- what apparent leap does the argument make between the evidence and the conclusion? This is an assumption of the argument, and it's absolutely core to the argument. See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/arguments- ... -the-gmat/
Obviously, in a "find the assumption question", this is relevant. One of the best ways to strengthen an argument is to verify its assumption, and one of the best ways to attack an argument is to undercut its assumption. Right there, you have the three most common GMAT CR questions, and a single skill, finding the assumption, can help with all three.

Again, here the assumption has something to do with a link between how aggressive rhesus monkeys are and how aggressive other kinds of monkeys would be.

Choice (C) goes to the heart of this --- essentially, it says rhesus monkeys are way more aggressive than other kinds of monkeys. Therefore, if the overcrowding is not enough to provoke the pugnacious rhesus monkeys to aggression, then it would not be enough to provoke any of the less aggressive monkeys either.

Choice (C) affirms the assumption of the argument, so it is an ideal strengthener, and the best answer among these five.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Re: In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding   [#permalink] 04 Apr 2013, 10:16
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Popular new posts In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding jerrywu 13 25 Sep 2006, 09:57
New posts In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding reply2spg 5 19 Feb 2009, 11:12
New posts 2 In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding raghavs 8 09 Nov 2010, 09:48
New posts 2 In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding enigma123 8 08 Nov 2011, 15:44
New posts In 1960’s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding in venmic 1 03 Sep 2012, 11:44
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In 1960 s studies of rats, scientists found that crowding

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.