Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 25 Dec 2014, 17:35

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 76
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 07:38
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average
of slightly less than two and a half hours a week doing
household chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six
hours a week.
A. chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six hours
a week
B. chores; by 1997 that figure had grown to nearly
six hours a week
C. chores, whereas nearly six hours a week were
spent in 1997
D. chores, compared with a figure of nearly six hours
a week in 1997
E. chores, that figure growing to nearly six hours a
week in 1997
_________________

GMAT by 8th JUL

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1418
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:04
I say A

B. isn't ||... were talking about children as a subject and shifted to figure
C. passive voice
D. "compared with" isn't correct... we are comparing the same thing, so should be "compared to"
E. the figure is still growing, but 1997 already passed... so incorrect tense
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 930
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:23
u2lover wrote:
I say A

B. isn't ||... were talking about children as a subject and shifted to figure
C. passive voice
D. "compared with" isn't correct... we are comparing the same thing, so should be "compared to"
E. the figure is still growing, but 1997 already passed... so incorrect tense


u2lover,

A small correction:

"compare with" is used to identify both the similarities and the differences of like things.
"compare to" is used to identify either the similarities or the differences between two unlike things.

:wink:

I am taking D.

In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of slightly less than two and a half hours a week doing household chores compared with a figure of nearly six hours a week in 1997.


Similar SC:

In 1973 mortgage payments represented twenty-one percent of an average thirty-year-old male’s income; and forty-four percent in 1984.
(A) income; and forty-four percent in 1984
(B) income; in 1984 the figure was forty-four percent
(C) income, and in 1984 forty-four percent
(D) income, forty-four percent in 1984 was the figure
(E) income that rose to forty-four percent in 1984

OA is B.

Regards,
Brajesh
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1418
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:35
b14kumar wrote:
u2lover wrote:
I say A

B. isn't ||... were talking about children as a subject and shifted to figure
C. passive voice
D. "compared with" isn't correct... we are comparing the same thing, so should be "compared to"
E. the figure is still growing, but 1997 already passed... so incorrect tense


u2lover,

A small correction:

"compare with" is used to identify both the similarities and the differences of like things.
"compare to" is used to identify either the similarities or the differences between two unlike things.

:wink:


this actually came from MGMAT SC Idiom list...
"compare with" (differences)
"compare to" (similarities)

so I thought we are comparing the same thing meaning the figure... thats why I eliminated it.

any thoughts? one more detail to reseach :idea:
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 1495
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 34 [0], given: 0

Re: SC - chores [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:41
foolbox wrote:
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average
of slightly less than two and a half hours a week doing household chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six hours a week.

A. chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six hours a week
B. chores; by 1997 that figure had grown to nearly six hours a week
C. chores, whereas nearly six hours a week were spent in 1997
D. chores, compared with a figure of nearly six hours a week in 1997
E. chores, that figure growing to nearly six hours a week in 1997


Should be C and D but seems both have typos. D looks ok.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 930
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:54
u2lover wrote:
b14kumar wrote:
u2lover wrote:
I say A

B. isn't ||... were talking about children as a subject and shifted to figure
C. passive voice
D. "compared with" isn't correct... we are comparing the same thing, so should be "compared to"
E. the figure is still growing, but 1997 already passed... so incorrect tense


u2lover,

A small correction:

"compare with" is used to identify both the similarities and the differences of like things.
"compare to" is used to identify either the similarities or the differences between two unlike things.

:wink:


this actually came from MGMAT SC Idiom list...
"compare with" (differences)
"compare to" (similarities)

so I thought we are comparing the same thing meaning the figure... thats why I eliminated it.

any thoughts? one more detail to reseach :idea:


We are comparing the like things i.e "amount of time spent".
So we need "compare with".

As per the definition:
"compare with" is used to identify both the similarities and the differences of like things.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Brajesh
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1418
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 08:58
from http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/066.html

Compare usually takes the preposition to when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things:
He compared her to a summer day.
Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer.

It takes with when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences:
The police compared the forged signature with the original.
The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House.

Brajesh... you're right, but any comments on MGMAT SC Idioms list? I am not clear with it...

any comments are welcome :!:
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 930
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 09:13
u2lover wrote:
from http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/066.html

Compare usually takes the preposition to when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things:
He compared her to a summer day.
Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer.

It takes with when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences:
The police compared the forged signature with the original.
The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House.

Brajesh... you're right, but any comments on MGMAT SC Idioms list? I am not clear with it...

any comments are welcome :!:


u2lover,

I don't have Manhattan GMAT SC Idiom list. :(
Could you please post some excerpts from the list?
How does MGMAT define the usage of "compare with/to" idioms?

Regards,
Brajesh
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1418
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 09:17
...
centers on
claims to be
compare to (similarities)
compare with (differences)

concerned with
...
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 930
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 09:27
u2lover wrote:
...
centers on
claims to be
compare to (similarities)
compare with (differences)

concerned with
...


So MGMAT says:
compare to (similarities)
compare with (differences)

This much is not enough to discern the clear and complete definition.

Already posted by you, http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/066.html has clear explanation. This is a good reference.

Regards,
Brajesh
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1418
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 18:08
yes that is all it says... may be not enough to draw conclusions, but enough to make a mistake :roll:
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 5245
Followers: 23

Kudos [?]: 154 [0], given: 0

Reviews Badge
 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 05:56
A makes an icomplete comparison. spent nearly six hours a week doing what?

Hard call between B and D.

Taking (B) because of the correct use of the semicolon.

OA?

3:32
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 76
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 06:40
No OA for this one.
I myself initially chose D, but...
Doesn't D have a modification problem?
What is compared with? It should be children, the subject of the main clause.

Some of my collegues suggest the answer is E. What do u think?
_________________

GMAT by 8th JUL

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jul 2006
Posts: 9
Location: India
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 08:47
I think it is B. Some one please explain why it can be wrong.[/quote]
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 01 Nov 2005
Posts: 126
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2006, 11:06
B.

google it and found the original article.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/ ... i_53365392
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Oct 2006
Posts: 439
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: SC - chores [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2006, 11:23
A and B are wrong for using past perfect tense. I think its wrong to use this tense here. 1997 comes after 1981 so use of perfect tense is not at all justfiable.

Rest among, C, D and E, I like D the most. Don't have explaination why C and E are wrong.

foolbox wrote:
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average
of slightly less than two and a half hours a week doing
household chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six
hours a week.
A. chores; by 1997 they had spent nearly six hours
a week
B. chores; by 1997 that figure had grown to nearly
six hours a week
C. chores, whereas nearly six hours a week were
spent in 1997
D. chores, compared with a figure of nearly six hours
a week in 1997
E. chores, that figure growing to nearly six hours a
week in 1997
Re: SC - chores   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2006, 11:23
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
6 In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of ankur55 7 27 Jul 2009, 02:07
8 Experts publish their posts in the topic In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of vaivish1723 9 03 Jul 2009, 01:08
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of arorag 4 03 Oct 2008, 17:27
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of singh_amit19 4 29 Sep 2007, 22:38
In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of jerrywu 11 30 Aug 2006, 10:11
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In 1981 children in the United States spent an average of

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.