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In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average

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In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2011, 08:08
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A
B
C
D
E

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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

95% (01:54) correct 5% (00:00) wrong based on 21 sessions
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average scores of high school students on standardized math and English tests did not decline. During the same year, millions of American students enjoyed their first exposure to the new world of the microcomputer, whether in schools, video arcades, or other settings. The conclusion is clear: far from stultifying the intellectual capacities of students, exposure to computers can actually enhance them.

The most serious weakness of the argument above is its failure to

(A) discuss the underlying causes of the twenty-year decline in students’ test scores
(B) cite specific figures documenting the increases in test scores
(C) distinguish among the various types of computer being used by high school students
(D) define the intellectual capacities tested by the standardized math and English tests referred to
(E) explain exactly how high school students’ abilities on math and English tests could have been enhanced by exposure to computers
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: GMAT_LSAT_CR [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2011, 07:36
I will go with E...Can you please post the OA along with the questions??
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Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2011, 09:03
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My response was E. It took me 2.09 minutes. I need to improve my speed.
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Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2011, 11:10
bholakc wrote:
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average scores of high school students on standardized math and English tests did not decline. During the same year, millions of American students enjoyed their first exposure to the new world of the microcomputer, whether in schools, video arcades, or other settings. The conclusion is clear: far from stultifying the intellectual capacities of students, exposure to computers can actually enhance them.

The most serious weakness of the argument above is its failure to

(A) discuss the underlying causes of the twenty-year decline in students’ test scores
(B) cite specific figures documenting the increases in test scores
(C) distinguish among the various types of computer being used by high school students
(D) define the intellectual capacities tested by the standardized math and English tests referred to
(E) explain exactly how high school students’ abilities on math and English tests could have been enhanced by exposure to computers


E will help to answer the question.
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Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2011, 12:58
bholakc wrote:
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average scores of high school students on standardized math and English tests did not decline. During the same year, millions of American students enjoyed their first exposure to the new world of the microcomputer, whether in schools, video arcades, or other settings. The conclusion is clear: far from stultifying the intellectual capacities of students, exposure to computers can actually enhance them.

The most serious weakness of the argument above is its failure to

(A) discuss the underlying causes of the twenty-year decline in students’ test scores
(B) cite specific figures documenting the increases in test scores
(C) distinguish among the various types of computer being used by high school students
(D) define the intellectual capacities tested by the standardized math and English tests referred to
(E) explain exactly how high school students’ abilities on math and English tests could have been enhanced by exposure to computers


Premise: Math and English score did not decline as it happens every year (for the past 9 years)
Premise: Students are exposed to microcomputers.
These two are independent facts and no connectivity was mentioned between them. Clearly Author did not mention how the 2nd fact helped in 1st fact. all that we can do is just assume.

A - Underlying causes of 1st fact isn't enough, need how these causes are connected to 2nd fact. -- eliminated
B - Figures aren't enough to connect these two facts.. eliminated
C - Again, this is isolated to 2nd fact - eliminated
D - again, this is isolated to 1st fact. Moreover 2nd fact did not tell whether it helped improve intellectual capacities... eliminated
E - here it is -- this tries to connect two premises in the way that how 1st fact was helped by 2nd fact...

So, it is E.
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Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2011, 06:12
B came close of all other options..but E is the answe..
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Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers [#permalink] New post 12 Sep 2011, 05:45
sarangadhar wrote:
bholakc wrote:
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average scores of high school students on standardized math and English tests did not decline. During the same year, millions of American students enjoyed their first exposure to the new world of the microcomputer, whether in schools, video arcades, or other settings. The conclusion is clear: far from stultifying the intellectual capacities of students, exposure to computers can actually enhance them.

The most serious weakness of the argument above is its failure to

(A) discuss the underlying causes of the twenty-year decline in students’ test scores
(B) cite specific figures documenting the increases in test scores
(C) distinguish among the various types of computer being used by high school students
(D) define the intellectual capacities tested by the standardized math and English tests referred to
(E) explain exactly how high school students’ abilities on math and English tests could have been enhanced by exposure to computers


Premise: Math and English score did not decline as it happens every year (for the past 9 years)
Premise: Students are exposed to microcomputers.
These two are independent facts and no connectivity was mentioned between them. Clearly Author did not mention how the 2nd fact helped in 1st fact. all that we can do is just assume.

A - Underlying causes of 1st fact isn't enough, need how these causes are connected to 2nd fact. -- eliminated
B - Figures aren't enough to connect these two facts.. eliminated
C - Again, this is isolated to 2nd fact - eliminated
D - again, this is isolated to 1st fact. Moreover 2nd fact did not tell whether it helped improve intellectual capacities... eliminated
E - here it is -- this tries to connect two premises in the way that how 1st fact was helped by 2nd fact...

So, it is E.


Good Explanation
Re: CR-Exposure to the new world of microcomputers   [#permalink] 12 Sep 2011, 05:45
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