Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 29 Aug 2014, 22:46

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In a 1000 m race, A gives B a start of 40 m and beats him by

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jun 2004
Posts: 90
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

In a 1000 m race, A gives B a start of 40 m and beats him by [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2004, 18:02
In a 1000 m race, A gives B a start of 40 m and beats him by 19 seconds. If A gives B a start of 30 seconds, B beats A by 40 m. Find the ratio of their respective speeds.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2004, 19:42
Not sure if I'm right working out this way, my gut feeling is I'm wrong as the ratio has a crazy number. But here it is.. if its' wrong, will be glad to see the solution !

Let A and B be the speed of A and B respectively. Then

1000/A - 960/B = 19 secs (From statement 1)

1040/B - 1000/A = 30 secs (From statement 2)

So solving gives B = 80/49 meters per second
and A = 1000/607 meters per second

So the ratio A/B = 1225:1214

I think I'm definitely wrong, but that's how I interprete the statements.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jun 2004
Posts: 893
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2004, 21:16

Attachments

Race.JPG
Race.JPG [ 16.95 KiB | Viewed 544 times ]

Joined: 31 Dec 1969
Location: United States
Concentration: Marketing, Other
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V38
GMAT 2: 660 Q V
GPA: 3.64
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 60 [0], given: 76345

 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2004, 23:39
Venksune, i think your post has some error in it? Do you mind posting it again ?
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 01:03
Hey Venksune, do you think you can explain how you derived both your equations ? thanks in advance !
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jun 2004
Posts: 90
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 05:23
ywilfred wrote:
Not sure if I'm right working out this way, my gut feeling is I'm wrong as the ratio has a crazy number. But here it is.. if its' wrong, will be glad to see the solution !

Let A and B be the speed of A and B respectively. Then

1000/A - 960/B = 19 secs (From statement 1)

1040/B - 1000/A = 30 secs (From statement 2)

So solving gives B = 80/49 meters per second
and A = 1000/607 meters per second

So the ratio A/B = 1225:1214

I think I'm definitely wrong, but that's how I interprete the statements.



From 1st fact, when A travels 1000 m, B manages to travel only 1000-40=960m. Also, B gets beaten by 19 seconds. Hence, B travels MORE by 19 seconds compared to A's time.

So you get, (1000/v1) = (960/v2) - 19 (you have to take out 19, rather than add 19 to balance the equation, as B's time is more).

From the second fact, you get, (960/v1) = (1000/v2) - 30 (Here again we take out 30 seconds, as B travels MORE by 30 seconds).

You really cannot use 1040 in the second equation, as it will mess up your time ratio. A does not travel more than the length of the race.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 05:29
But if B is beaten by 19 seconds, that means when A reaches the finishing line, B is still 19 seconds behind. So 19 seconds should be added if we want to equate both sides, shouldn't we?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jun 2004
Posts: 90
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 05:33
ywilfred wrote:
But if B is beaten by 19 seconds, that means when A reaches the finishing line, B is still 19 seconds behind. So 19 seconds should be added if we want to equate both sides, shouldn't we?


The way I understand it is, if X beats Y by 19 seconds, that means that X is faster and Y is slower. Hence X reaches finishing line in less than (19 seconds) than Y. That means that Y will still travel 19 MORE seconds after X has already reached the finishing line. So if you are comparing time, you need to take out 19 seconds from the slower guy to equal them up.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jun 2004
Posts: 90
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 05:41
If you look at the statement "In a 1000 m race, A gives B a start of 40 m and beats him by 19 seconds". That means that A has beaten B in the race. That means that both A and B NEED TO COMPLETE the race if one of them has to be beaten.

If I am not wrong, your interpretation of the statement is, at the time when A reaches finishing line, B is "19 seconds behind A" and race is over. But if you interpret it like that, that means that B still has not completed the race. If B has not completed the race yet, he cannot be beaten. He can only be beaten when he actually completes the race (atleast in our situation :) )

Any flaws you see?
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 06:10
That's exactly how i interpreted the question ! I suppose we can't assume too much when we deal with these questions ! This one will go into my notebook :-D

Thanks for the explanation !
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jun 2004
Posts: 90
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 06:16
I really thought about this, and this is the conclusion I came to. If A beats B in time, than we need to take time out of B to equal their TIMES. Alternatively, if A beats B is distance, than we need to add distance to B to equal their DISTANCES.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 06:21
That's a really interesting way to look at it. I got a little confused when the question started going into how much time B is beaten. I just kept thinking whether to add or not. I guess this method is a great way to remember !
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jun 2004
Posts: 893
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 07:11
Sorry guys to chip in late...I think you guys had some great discussions and I can see that there is already enough understanding now. 8-)

I can add some good race / time-dsitance problems....do u guys wanna try it. Let me know...and I will post them.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2004, 07:42
Venksune, I'm all game for these questions ! I need to sharpen my abilities a little at these problems. Keep them coming !
  [#permalink] 18 Aug 2004, 07:42
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic In a 1000 m race Usha beats Shiny by 50 m. In the same race, iwantto 12 05 Apr 2013, 10:38
A and B ran a race of 480 m. In the first heat, A gives B a Natasha0123 3 28 Oct 2008, 04:52
A and B ran a race of 480 m. In the first heat, A gives B a lan583 4 16 Nov 2006, 08:36
In a km race, A gives B a start of 20 seconds and beats him GMATT73 2 29 Oct 2005, 09:34
In a km race, A gives B a start of 20 seconds and beats him christoph 8 20 May 2005, 06:06
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In a 1000 m race, A gives B a start of 40 m and beats him by

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.