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In a political system with only two major parties, the

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In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2009, 07:59
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In a political system with only two major parties, the entrance of a third-party candidate into
an election race damages the chances of only one of the two major candidates. The third-party
candidate always attracts some of the voters who might otherwise have voted for one of the
two major candidates, but not voters who support the other candidate. Since a third-party
candidacy affects the two major candidates unequally, for reasons neither of them has any
control over, the practice is unfair and should not be allowed.
If the factual information in the passage above is true, which of the following can be most
reliably inferred from it?
(A) If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two
major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.
(B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two
major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of
the vote.
(C) A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for
candidates of either of the two major parties.
(D) The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major
parties.
(E) The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the
two major parties.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2009, 11:21
trainspotting wrote:
In a political system with only two major parties, the entrance of a third-party candidate into an election race damages the chances of only one of the two major candidates. The third-party candidate always attracts some of the voters who might otherwise have voted for one of the two major candidates, but not voters who support the other candidate. Since a third-party candidacy affects the two major candidates unequally, for reasons neither of them has any control over, the practice is unfair and should not be allowed.
If the factual information in the passage above is true, which of the following can be most reliably inferred from it?

(A) If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.
(B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.
(C) A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the two major parties.
(D) The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.
(E) The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.


Here we have a 'must be true' question...

(A) we don't know that the influence will be 'equal'... a third party might draw 60% of its votes from one party & 40 from the other.
(C) We can't deduce this from the info, for it did not discuss new/old voters.
(D) We don't know this either, we just know the 3rd party will only appeal to one party's members or those of the other, the info does not tell us anything about political ideology.
(E) We also can't deduce this from the info; in fact, considering that only the members of ONE party will be attracted, this is most likely not true.

By POE, we're left with (B).

Last edited by GMATaddict on 27 Jun 2009, 12:12, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2009, 12:06
B for me too :)
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2009, 16:30
It's B for me
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2009, 03:09
OA?
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2009, 07:09
is something wrong with the wordings of otion B

B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more
than one-half of the vote.

it itself says "voters were divided equally between the two major parties,"

if there are 100 voters and we divide them equally between two major parties then for sure neither parties is likely to capture more than 1/2 of the votes.

anything u divide equally between to people each will get 1/2 of it. :-D
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2009, 09:25
B can be the only option. But not through a sound logical conclusion but because other options were even worse.. :(
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2009, 11:22
hitman4683v1 wrote:
B can be the only option. But not through a sound logical conclusion but because other options were even worse.. :(

I have doubt with anser B. Since it is "Must be true" question type, the answer must be inferred from the stimulus. Whereas the stimulus only tells that the emergance of the thrid party affects once of the two party and it does not tell about individual positions of two parties.
Where am i wrong?
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2009, 11:36
gmataspirant2009 wrote:
hitman4683v1 wrote:
B can be the only option. But not through a sound logical conclusion but because other options were even worse.. :(

I have doubt with anser B. Since it is "Must be true" question type, the answer must be inferred from the stimulus. Whereas the stimulus only tells that the emergance of the thrid party affects once of the two party and it does not tell about individual positions of two parties.
Where am i wrong?



As I said, I too was not fully convinced with B, however even the other options do not make sense
C -> The never voted people are never discussed in the passage
D -> Purely out of scope
E -> True in case of politics of my country but hey author never referred to my country :lol:
A -> Since the premise says that only one particular party of the earlier two parties would loose the votes, so this option is also negated, plus it makes an additional unstated assumption, that the 3rd party is a compromise.

That leaves option B, which is the better of all 5 evils :twisted:
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2009, 17:43
should be B

OA?
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2015, 18:53
I thought B so clearly defeats all other options here with a very straightforward logic. No PoE reqd.

According to the passage:
Party X and Party Y exist.
Party Z comes in and takes away votes from X and Y unequally.
Conclusion: Therefore, this practice (of a third party entering) is unfair.

What must be true?

Option B:
If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equallybetween the two major parties i.e.
X has 50%
Y has 50%
(Game over! Even before Z enters, choice B holds true. Neither X nor Y will get more than 50% :) )
Entrance of C will further reduce either X's or Y's votes, which can never be >50%. Hence B has to be true alwayz.

I did not even bothered reading rest of the choices, hope i was not tricked here.. :|
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2016, 11:37
The question's OA is B

Added to the 1st post. :)

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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the   [#permalink] 22 Jun 2016, 11:37
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