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In colonial Connecticut between 1670 and 1719, women

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In colonial Connecticut between 1670 and 1719, women [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2012, 07:56
In colonial Connecticut between 1670 and 1719,
women participated in one of every six civil cases, the
vast majority of which were debt related. Women’s
participation dropped to one in ten cases after 1719,
and to one in twenty by the 1770’s. However, as
Cornelia Hughes Dayton notes in Women Before the
Bar: Gender, Law, and Society in Connecticut, 1639-
1789, these statistics are somewhat deceptive: in fact,
both the absolute numbers and the percentage of
adult women participating in civil cases grew steadily
throughout the eighteenth century, but the legal
activity of men also increased dramatically, and at a
much faster rate. Single, married, and widowed
women continued to pursue their own and their
husbands’ debtors through legal action much as they
had done in the previous century, but despite this
continuity, their place in the legal system shifted
dramatically. Men’s commercial interests and credit
networks became increasingly far-flung, owing in part
to the ability of creditors to buy and sell promissory
notes (legal promises to pay debts). At the same time,
women’s networks of credit and debt remained
primarily local and personal. Dayton contends that,
although still performing crucial economic services in
their communities—services that contributed to the
commercialization of the colonial economy—women
remained for the most part outside the new economic
and legal culture of the eighteenth century.

The passage is primarily concerned with
A. reporting an author’s view of a phenomenon
B. disputing the reasons usually given for an
unexpected change
C. evaluating the conclusions reached by an author
D. assessing the impact of certain legal decisions
E. defending a controversial point of view

OA after some discussion....
In colonial Connecticut between 1670 and 1719, women   [#permalink] 13 Nov 2012, 07:56
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In colonial Connecticut between 1670 and 1719, women

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