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In Forces of Production, David Noble examines the

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In Forces of Production, David Noble examines the [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 05:38
In Forces of Production, David Noble examines the transformation of the machine-tool industry as the industry moved from reliance on skilled artisans to automation. Noble writes from a Marxist perspective, and his central argument is that management, in its decisions to automate, conspired against labor: the power that the skilled machinists wielded in the industry was intolerable to management. Noble fails to substantiate this claim, although his argument is impressive when he applies the Marxist concept of “de-skilling”—the use of technology to replace skilled labor—to the automation of the machine-tool industry. In automating, the industry moved to computer-based, digitized “numerical-control” (N/C) technology, rather than to artisan-generated “record-playback” (R/P) technology.
Although both systems reduced reliance on skilled labor, Noble clearly prefers R/P, with its inherent acknowledgment of workers’ skills: unlike N/C, its programs were produced not by engineers at their computers, but by skilled machinists, who recorded their own movements to “teach” machines to duplicate those movements. However, Noble’s only evidence of conspiracy is that, although the two approaches were roughly equal in technical merit, management chose N/C. From this he concludes that automation is undertaken not because efficiency demands it or scientific advances allow it, but because it is a tool in the ceaseless war of capitalists against labor.

5. Which of the following phrases most clearly reveals the attitude of the author of the passage toward Noble’s central argument?
(A) “conspired against” (line 6)
(B) “intolerable to management” (line 7)
(C) “impressive when he applies the Marxist concept” (line 9)
(D) “clearly prefers” (line 16)
(E) “only evidence of conspiracy” (line 21)


Please explain.
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 06:49
may be C.

author is agreeing some of the points raised by Noble. But he thinks Noble may not be impartial...?
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 06:59
Really tough one. I also zeroed down to option C.
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 09:49
yeah tough one..i would choose E
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 11:04
Tough one. I was down to C & D

I chose D because that Noble clearly prefers R/P over N/C and thats what author is saying about N

C is used in part to establish that Noble was not able to substantiate his bigger claim that management prefers one over the other.

When the author said N clearly prefers N/C over R/P, it is because N prefers it and not because of a good reason but because of his assumed marxist de skilling concept

What is the OA?
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 11:55
IMO C.

The only portion where author shows his notion towards David Noble is "Noble fails to substantiate this claim, although his argument is impressive when he applies the Marxist concept of “de-skilling” ".
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 21:18
ConkergMat wrote:
In Forces of Production, David Noble examines the transformation of the machine-tool industry as the industry moved from reliance on skilled artisans to automation. Noble writes from a Marxist perspective, and his central argument is that management, in its decisions to automate, conspired against labor: the power that the skilled machinists wielded in the industry was intolerable to management. Noble fails to substantiate this claim, although his argument is impressive when he applies the Marxist concept of “de-skilling”—the use of technology to replace skilled labor—to the automation of the machine-tool industry. In automating, the industry moved to computer-based, digitized “numerical-control” (N/C) technology, rather than to artisan-generated “record-playback” (R/P) technology.
Although both systems reduced reliance on skilled labor, Noble clearly prefers R/P, with its inherent acknowledgment of workers’ skills: unlike N/C, its programs were produced not by engineers at their computers, but by skilled machinists, who recorded their own movements to “teach” machines to duplicate those movements. However, Noble’s only evidence of conspiracy is that, although the two approaches were roughly equal in technical merit, management chose N/C. From this he concludes that automation is undertaken not because efficiency demands it or scientific advances allow it, but because it is a tool in the ceaseless war of capitalists against labor.

5. Which of the following phrases most clearly reveals the attitude of the author of the passage toward Noble’s central argument?
(A) “conspired against” (line 6)
(B) “intolerable to management” (line 7)
(C) “impressive when he applies the Marxist concept” (line 9)
(D) “clearly prefers” (line 16)
(E) “only evidence of conspiracy” (line 21)


Please explain.


I think its E...............
and his central argument is that management, in its decisions to automate, conspired against labor: the power that the skilled machinists wielded in the industry was intolerable to management. Noble fails to substantiate this claim.

if we have a look at these statements , it clearly mentions that the central argument is about decision to automate and conspiracy against labour. but then the author states Noble fail to substantiate this claim, and then he explains how noble is giving points against automation.............
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2009, 22:57
Folks OA is listed as E.

It clearly mentions 'C' in the 'de-skilling' line...
Lose confidence when we lose points on RC detail qns... :roll:
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Re: RC: analysis of a book. [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2009, 01:56
I preferred E. Were the line numbers given in the question as u have marked heer? otherwise ,its very difficult.
I hope i dnt encounter such type of RC in real exam.
ConkergMat wrote:
In Forces of Production, David Noble examines the transformation of the machine-tool industry as the industry moved from reliance on skilled artisans to automation. Noble writes from a Marxist perspective, and his central argument is that management, in its decisions to automate, conspired against labor: the power that the skilled machinists wielded in the industry was intolerable to management. Noble fails to substantiate this claim, although his argument is impressive when he applies the Marxist concept of “de-skilling”—the use of technology to replace skilled labor—to the automation of the machine-tool industry. In automating, the industry moved to computer-based, digitized “numerical-control” (N/C) technology, rather than to artisan-generated “record-playback” (R/P) technology.
Although both systems reduced reliance on skilled labor, Noble clearly prefers R/P, with its inherent acknowledgment of workers’ skills: unlike N/C, its programs were produced not by engineers at their computers, but by skilled machinists, who recorded their own movements to “teach” machines to duplicate those movements. However, Noble’s only evidence of conspiracy is that, although the two approaches were roughly equal in technical merit, management chose N/C. From this he concludes that automation is undertaken not because efficiency demands it or scientific advances allow it, but because it is a tool in the ceaseless war of capitalists against labor.

5. Which of the following phrases most clearly reveals the attitude of the author of the passage toward Noble’s central argument?
(A) “conspired against” (line 6)
(B) “intolerable to management” (line 7)
(C) “impressive when he applies the Marxist concept” (line 9)
(D) “clearly prefers” (line 16)
(E) “only evidence of conspiracy” (line 21)


Please explain.
Re: RC: analysis of a book.   [#permalink] 05 Feb 2009, 01:56
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