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In geology, the term transform fault potential denotes the

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In geology, the term transform fault potential denotes the [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 03:01
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In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved along a major transform fault line, such as California’s San Andreas, by an instantaneous strain release, commonly known as an earthquake.

A. the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved

B. the extent to which one tectonic plate could move

C. the extent that one tectonic plate could be moved

D. the extent of one tectonic plate moving

E. the extent of the movement of one tectonic plate


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[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by thelosthippie on 07 May 2013, 02:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 03:32
Damn Hippie, your questions are really tough! Very valuable!

thelosthippie wrote:
In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved along a major transform fault line, such as California’s San Andreas, by an instantaneous strain release, commonly known as an earthquake.


Passive voice "be moved" is needed because we have the doer: "by an instantaneous strain release". A/C dillema:

A. the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved
"to some extent" is idiomatic. Correct.
C. the extent that one tectonic plate could be moved
Could one be moved an extent? I don't know such idiom, but perhaps...

Open to dispute.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 03:35
I think that the answer should be A, because "could be moved" is required as the action is done "by an instantaneous strain release"
So could be moved .... by an instantaneous strain release ....

A. the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved correct

B. the extent to which one tectonic plate could move

C. the extent that one tectonic plate could be moved

D. the extent of one tectonic plate moving

E. the extent of the movement of one tectonic plate
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 03:40
ankurgupta03 wrote:
I think the answer to the question should be B


I think it should be "with an instantenaous strain release" if you wanted Active voice. Experts please comment.

"A plate is moved by sh"
"A plate moves with sh" ??
Does one move with strides or by strides? Or perhaps in strides?
Don't know :/
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 05:44
In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved along a major transform fault line, such as California’s San Andreas, by an instantaneous strain release, commonly known as an earthquake.

A. the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved

B. the extent to which one tectonic plate could move

C. the extent that one tectonic plate could be moved

D. the extent of one tectonic plate moving

E. the extent of the movement of one tectonic plate

In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved along a major transform fault line, such as California’s San Andreas, by an instantaneous strain release, commonly known as an earthquake.

U need passive voice in the answer choices to match with the colored part in non underlined portion.

B,C and E are out.. Extent to which is correct. So, My take A..
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 09:34
Expert's post
HumptyDumpty wrote

Quote:
ankurgupta03 wrote:
I think the answer to the question should be B


Dear HumptyDumpty, Where is taht quote that you have mentioed babout ankurgupta in which he says the ans is B ? As far I as I see, I find anly A as his answer/Or has somebody edited the earlier version. I am curious to know the explanation by ankur for choosing the answer B, if it is so.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 09:37
Expert's post
Many of the idioms are context -related. In this case, -by an instantaneous - is the accepted one - we can see after all it is not underlined. So, there is no ambiguity about that. All other forms can be evaluated only after seeing the contexts.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 09:48
Hi mates,

Can someone explain me whats wrong with D

Moving is a +ing modifier right? and its modifying technoic plate..Then what is the wrong with tat?

I have a query could be moved is this also a form of to be +verbed type?

AM being a non-native speaker can some1 throw light on this

I am considering two sentences:
The road lane could be moved - meaning: the road lane is about to be moved very soon in the future
Te books are about to be sold- meaning: the books are about to be sold soon in future

Is the meaning for both the sentences correct?
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 09:59
Expert's post
skamal7 wrote:
Hi mates,

Can someone explain me whats wrong with D

Moving is a +ing modifier right? and its modifying technoic plate..Then what is the wrong with tat?

I have a query could be moved is this also a form of to be +verbed type?

AM being a non-native speaker can some1 throw light on this

I am considering two sentences:
The road lane could be moved - meaning: the road lane is about to be moved very soon in the future
Te books are about to be sold- meaning: the books are about to be sold soon in future

Is the meaning for both the sentences correct?


Hi Skamal, there is one person who can explain exactly what is wrong with answer choice D... and his name... is Vanilla Ice!

http://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2013/03 ... orrection/
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 10:00
daagh wrote:
HumptyDumpty wrote

Quote:
ankurgupta03 wrote:
I think the answer to the question should be B


Dear HumptyDumpty, Where is taht quote that you have mentioed babout ankurgupta in which he says the ans is B ? As far I as I see, I find anly A as his answer/Or has somebody edited the earlier version. I am curious to know the explanation by ankur for choosing the answer B, if it is so.



I suppose he must have edited his post! I simply qouted it at the time given :).
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 17:48
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@HumptyDumpty
It looks so. I agree with you in toto.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 18:52
Correct answer is A. - the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved

Earthquake moves the tectonic plate (since its in passive.. so we need to say, extent to which one tectonic plane could be moved "by")
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes [#permalink] New post 07 May 2013, 04:02
HumptyDumpty wrote:
Damn Hippie, your questions are really tough! Very valuable!

thelosthippie wrote:
In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved along a major transform fault line, such as California’s San Andreas, by an instantaneous strain release, commonly known as an earthquake.


Passive voice "be moved" is needed because we have the doer: "by an instantaneous strain release". A/C dillema:

A. the extent to which one tectonic plate could be moved
"to some extent" is idiomatic. Correct.
C. the extent that one tectonic plate could be moved
Could one be moved an extent? I don't know such idiom, but perhaps...

Open to dispute.


Thank you HumptyDumpty 8-)

Yeah that's the answer 'A'

Note the phrase “…by an instantaneous strain release…” – this phrase requires that the plate doesn’t move on its own, but has another actor moving it (the earthquake). So this question requires the phrase “a plate could be moved…(by an earthquake)” to supply that actor. So only A and C are in play. And while A may sound a bit clunky with the “extent to which…” phrasing, put that in your own context. You’d say “to a large extent” or “to some extent” – and in either case the word “extent” begs for the word “to”. So A must be correct in order to complete that phrasing.
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Re: In geology, the term “transform fault potential” denotes   [#permalink] 07 May 2013, 04:02
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