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In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as

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In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 01:09
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In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as antagonists to certain chemicals have caused psychological disturbances in patients, which may limit their potential to relieve severe pain.


(A) which may limit their potential to relieve
(B) which may limit their potential for relieving
(C) which may limit such analgesics’ potential to relieve
(D) an effect that may limit their potential to relieve
(E) an effect that may limit the potential of such analgesics for relieving
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 01:35
Should be E.

A,B and C are out b'coz of "which".
D is out b'coz "their" can refer to both "patients" and "analgesics".
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 03:40
buzzgaurav wrote:
Should be E.

A,B and C are out b'coz of "which".
D is out b'coz "their" can refer to both "patients" and "analgesics".



In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as antagonists to certain chemicals have caused psychological disturbances in patients, which may limit their potential to relieve severe pain.

But shouldn't the second part of the sentence talk about analgesic rather than it's effect, since the subject in the sentence is 'analgesic'?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 05:00
buzzgaurav wrote:
Should be E.

A,B and C are out b'coz of "which".
D is out b'coz "their" can refer to both "patients" and "analgesics".


Yup E... but Isn't it really wordy :shock:
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 05:06
zoom612 wrote:

In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as antagonists to certain chemicals have caused psychological disturbances in patients, which may limit their potential to relieve severe pain.

But shouldn't the second part of the sentence talk about analgesic rather than it's effect, since the subject in the sentence is 'analgesic'?


In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as antagonists to certain chemicals have caused psychological disturbances in patients, an effect that may limit the potential of such analgesics for relieving severe pain.

It's the effect that we are talking about in the clause which has limited the potential of analgesics as mentioned in the last cause.
"an effect" correctly refers to "psychological disturbances in patients".

Even by POE, it's easy to eliminate A,B and C b'coz "which" is incorrectly modifying "patients".
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 05:07
i go for E in A,B C which modify patients and in D their is not clear
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 05:23
Hi, this is a difficult problem. Let's try to analyze it logically.

"In large doses, analgesics that work in the brain as antagonists to certain chemicals have caused psychological disturbances in patients, which may limit their potential to relieve severe pain."
(A) which may limit their potential to relieve
(B) which may limit their potential for relieving
(C) which may limit such analgesics’ potential to relieve
(D) an effect that may limit their potential to relieve
(E) an effect that may limit the potential of such analgesics for relieving

The word "which" in the original sentence refers only to psychological disturbances, as that is the non-human noun directly before it, and it is these disturbances that may limit the potential of the analgesics to relieve severe pain. So "which" is not wrong in that position. The problem is the word, "their," which actually refers to patients, but cannot do so logically. So A, B, and D are not possible answers. We must clarify the fact that it is the analgesics that cannot relieve pain. The choice is between C and E.
E, however, uses the faulty combination "the potential for relieving," which disqualifies the answer. We use the noun "potential" with "for" before nouns, as in "the potential for growth." However, although gerunds act like nouns, do not use this structure in front of a gerund. Use the infinitive instead: "the potential to grow."
The answer must be C.
Not easy, but interesting.
Good luck with your studying.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 06:54
I also believe its C.

But my reason was different that given by leanna. the correct idiom is "potential to relieve"
we can live with "which" but we can not live with wrong idiom.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 07:37
nice one... I picked E... I don't know the stupid idioms :cry:

so is the "potential" always ought to do something? f.e. potential to relieve, potential to destroy, potential to succeed... etc we can't say "she has a potential for success"?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 07:48
u2lover wrote:
nice one... I picked E... I don't know the stupid idioms :cry:

so is the "potential" always ought to do something? f.e. potential to relieve, potential to destroy, potential to succeed... etc we can't say "she has a potential for success"?


"she has a potential for success" Correct? :yes
"she has a potential to succeed" Correct? :yes

potential TO <VERB>
potential FOR <NOUN>
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 08:16
ps_dahiya wrote:
u2lover wrote:
nice one... I picked E... I don't know the stupid idioms :cry:

so is the "potential" always ought to do something? f.e. potential to relieve, potential to destroy, potential to succeed... etc we can't say "she has a potential for success"?


"she has a potential for success" Correct? :yes
"she has a potential to succeed" Correct? :yes

potential TO <VERB>
potential FOR <NOUN>


just :no for "potential of".... f.e. "potential of succeeding" :?: :dunnow
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 08:29
u2lover wrote:
ps_dahiya wrote:
u2lover wrote:
nice one... I picked E... I don't know the stupid idioms :cry:

so is the "potential" always ought to do something? f.e. potential to relieve, potential to destroy, potential to succeed... etc we can't say "she has a potential for success"?


"she has a potential for success" Correct? :yes
"she has a potential to succeed" Correct? :yes

potential TO <VERB>
potential FOR <NOUN>


just :no for "potential of".... f.e. "potential of succeeding" :?: :dunnow

succeeding is an adjective. Straight NO NO :no :no
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 08:39
Anything with "OF" is no good... or adjectives only, so "potential of success" is correct then :?:

Potential for success
Potential to succeed
Potential of succeeding :no
Potential of success :?:

dahiya... thanks for your patience... I suck at these suckers :twisted:
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 09:01
tx for the explanation I need to start to build a file with idioms it seems that is the most commonly tested error over all and the hardest to spot....
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 09:17
u2lover wrote:
Anything with "OF" is no good... or adjectives only, so "potential of success" is correct then :?:

Potential for success
Potential to succeed
Potential of succeeding :no
Potential of success :?:

dahiya... thanks for your patience... I suck at these suckers :twisted:

:-D :-D Thats OK....

I searched a lot on this and could not find anything like "potential of".

Potential is used either as a noun or as an adjective.

When used as adjective then no idiom (But obvious): potential problem
When used as noun then two idioms:

potential TO <VERB>
potential FOR <NOUN>
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 13:38
going with C as well...

A: who does their refer to? can refer to patients, can rerfe to disturbances, can refer to analgesics
B: potential to relieve, also relieving is present continuous
D: their?
E: potential for? incorrect, also wordy

to remember potential for/to

u2lover and u2lovergirl have the potential to be happy.
u2lover and u2lovergirl have the potential for happiness.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 13:49
Good one... I selected E though :cry:
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 17:52
guys, just curious to know if using "an effect" is okay in E? I think the "psychological disturbances" is plural and hence E should have used "effects" rather than "an effect" for it to qualify as a potential answer.
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Re: SC:Analgesic [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 17:58
IMO, C should be it.

D and E are out 'cuz "an effect" should be "effects"
In A and B, "their" is ambiguous.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 19:49
shoonya wrote:
guys, just curious to know if using "an effect" is okay in E? I think the "psychological disturbances" is plural and hence E should have used "effects" rather than "an effect" for it to qualify as a potential answer.


You are right. But even with "effects", this part of E looks awkward: "potential of such analgesics for relieving"
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  [#permalink] 27 Jul 2006, 19:49
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