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In many upper-class Egyptian homes, French was spoken within

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In many upper-class Egyptian homes, French was spoken within [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2005, 11:45
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A
B
C
D
E

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In many upper-class Egyptian homes, French was spoken within the family, just as it had once been among the Russian aristocracy.
(A) just as it had once been among the Russian aristocracy
(B) just like it once been among the Russian aristocracy
(C) just as Russian aristocracy had once done
(D) similar to what the Russian aristocracy had once done
(E) like what had once been done by the Russian aristocracy
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2005, 12:03
Any option with "Done" is wrong. This is something which happened and now is over with. So, C, D, E are out

We are left with A, B
B is missing a verb

I will go with A

What is OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2005, 12:49
riteshgupta1 wrote:
Any option with "Done" is wrong. This is something which happened and now is over with. So, C, D, E are out

We are left with A, B
B is missing a verb

I will go with A

What is OA?


riteshgupta, Can you tell me what the pronoun 'it' refers to in A
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2005, 19:25
I will also pick (A).

1. it - French ("just as" makes it refer to French)
2. "just as" is right Idiom.
3. just as it had once been (spoken) among the Russian aristocracy.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 05:12
jpv wrote:
I will also pick (A).

1. it - French ("just as" makes it refer to French)
2. "just as" is right Idiom.
3. just as it had once been (spoken) among the Russian aristocracy.


jpv, Isn't French referring to the Language here thereby making it an adjective and not a noun - doesn't a pronoun be required to refer to another noun and not an adjective. Any thoughts?
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Re: SC: French [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 05:29
banerjeea_98 wrote:
In many upper-class Egyptian homes, French was spoken within the family, just as it had once been among the Russian aristocracy.
(A) just as it had once been among the Russian aristocracy
(B) just like it once been among the Russian aristocracy
(C) just as Russian aristocracy had once done
(D) similar to what the Russian aristocracy had once done
(E) like what had once been done by the Russian aristocracy



Besides A and C all other AC's use "as" Vs "like" incorrrectly.

I think the C is the better AC because

1) A is passive and C conveys the same thing as A without taking the passive form.

2) The comparison of "French" being spoken by the Russian aristocracy is an implicit one.

For e.g. French was spoken within the family, just as Russian aristocracy had one done ---> This sentence succintly conveys the meaning without including the extra verbiage "just as it".....
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 05:34
rthothad wrote:
jpv wrote:
I will also pick (A).

1. it - French ("just as" makes it refer to French)
2. "just as" is right Idiom.
3. just as it had once been (spoken) among the Russian aristocracy.


jpv, Isn't French referring to the Language here thereby making it an adjective and not a noun - doesn't a pronoun be required to refer to another noun and not an adjective. Any thoughts?


Interesting point. Could you please elaborate .....I can think of sentences where French is used as a noun.

e.g: The French are brave.

Not trying to be argumentative but would like for you to elaborate on this concept. Frence = adjective [always??] or even in this case.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 07:02
"A" correctly restates French with "it" and preserves the original verb tense. It must be A :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 09:28
gmataquaguy wrote:
Interesting point. Could you please elaborate .....I can think of sentences where French is used as a noun.

e.g: The French are brave.

Not trying to be argumentative but would like for you to elaborate on this concept. Frence = adjective [always??] or even in this case.

aquaguy, Here you are referring to the French people so it is correct but in the question it refers to the language.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 10:28
OA is "A"
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2005, 17:54
rthothad wrote:
jpv, Isn't French referring to the Language here thereby making it an adjective and not a noun - doesn't a pronoun be required to refer to another noun and not an adjective. Any thoughts?


I dont know whether I have understood ur question correctly :roll: ?

French is Noun here not Adjective.

According to ur current analogy..
What will u say for Apple (in reference with Fruit)?
will u say Apple as Adjective??
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2005, 08:18
jpv wrote:
I dont know whether I have understood ur question correctly :roll: ?

French is Noun here not Adjective.

According to ur current analogy..
What will u say for Apple (in reference with Fruit)?
will u say Apple as Adjective??


Let me try to explain - my dilemma.

In the above the sentence 'French' is used to refer to the language that was spoken within the family, so 'French' is used to refer to a language, which makes it an adjective and not a noun.
I think the 'it' in the sentence will refer to 'family'.

If the word 'French' was used to refer to the people of France then it would be a noun, like aquaguy's example - The French are brave.

In your above example Apple is definitely a noun.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2005, 13:08
riteshgupta1 wrote:
Any option with "Done" is wrong. This is something which happened and now is over with. So, C, D, E are out

We are left with A, B
B is missing a verb

I will go with A

What is OA?


Why do you say any AC with "done" is wrong? Are you saying "done" can never be used to show an action that completed in the past?

here is an e.g:

I was done with my homework.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2005, 13:10
banerjeea_98 wrote:
OA is "A"


Ban, what is the Official explanation (OE)? Can anyone explain why they chose "A" over "C"?

It would be nice for people to post OE.....
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2005, 18:01
rthothad wrote:
In the above the sentence 'French' is used to refer to the language that was spoken within the family, so 'French' is used to refer to a language, which makes it an adjective and not a noun.
I think the 'it' in the sentence will refer to 'family'.

If the word 'French' was used to refer to the people of France then it would be a noun, like aquaguy's example - The French are brave.


I see ur point:
In many upper-class Egyptian homes, French (language) was spoken within the family, just as it had once been among the Russian aristocracy.

I doubt whether a Noun (French) can be used as an Adjective.

Study the sentence more carefully.
French was spoken within the family.
Passive construction, in which the OBJECT (which should always be Noun) is made the Subject of the sentence/clause.


rthothad wrote:
I think the 'it' in the sentence will refer to 'family'.


"it" refers to French here. Parallel Structure (passive).

French was spoken within the family.
just as it had once been (spoken) among the Russian aristocracy

I guess I am right. Correct me if you find any discrepancy.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2005, 18:47
jpv wrote:
I doubt whether a Noun (French) can be used as an Adjective.


I am not sure whether French in general is a noun

The following is from dictionary.com - check out French being metioned as an adjective and also French being a noun when used to refer to the people of France

French ( P ) Pronunciation Key (frnch)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of France or its people or culture.
Of or relating to the French language

n.
The Romance language of France, parts of Switzerland and Belgium, and other countries formerly under French influence or control.
(used with a pl. verb) The people of France.
Slang. Coarse or vulgar language: Pardon my French
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2005, 19:00
rthothad wrote:
French ( P ) Pronunciation Key (frnch)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of France or its people or culture.
Of or relating to the French language


I got it. for eg:
1. french culture, french tradition
2. french sentence, french slang.

Thanks for correcting.

However, here it is definitely Noun.
  [#permalink] 30 Apr 2005, 19:00
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