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In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of

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In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2008, 07:42
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142. In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of marketing, the Coca-Cola company in July 1985 yielded to thousands of irate consumers demanding that it should bring back the original Coke formula.

A. demanding that it should
B. demanding it to
C. and their demand to
D. who demanded that it
E. who demanded it to



I'm finding a trend in my errors and I need help with pronoun agreement and pronoun case. What is the subject of this question? The object? Is there a trick to determining this?
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2008, 09:44
Hi,

I would go for E. It use 'who' correctly and it also references coca-cola.

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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2008, 12:15
raconteur wrote:
142. In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of marketing, the Coca-Cola company in July 1985 yielded to thousands of irate consumers demanding that it should bring back the original Coke formula.

A. demanding that it should
B. demanding it to
C. and their demand to
D. who demanded that it
E. who demanded it to

I'm finding a trend in my errors and I need help with pronoun agreement and pronoun case. What is the subject of this question? The object? Is there a trick to determining this?


E.
Subject = the Coca-Cola company
Verb = yielded
Objet = thousands of irate consumers
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2008, 12:38
raconteur wrote:
142. In one of the most stunning reversals in the history of marketing, the Coca-Cola company in July 1985 yielded to thousands of irate consumers demanding that it should bring back the original Coke formula.

A. demanding that it should
B. demanding it to
C. and their demand to
D. who demanded that it
E. who demanded it to



I'm finding a trend in my errors and I need help with pronoun agreement and pronoun case. What is the subject of this question? The object? Is there a trick to determining this?


I believe it should be D.

I think this is subjuctive mood.
demanded + that + it + bring (infinitive form)
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2008, 16:37
I think D is more parallel because the Coca-Cola company YIELDED to the irate consumers. therefore, the customers demanded it (coca-cola itself) to bring back..., not demanded THAT it bring back.... because the customers would simply demand that it should be brought back, not necessarily demand the company to bring it back. As for subjunctive moods, I'm not sure if everyone here spoke English originally, but I'm 99% sure that in english we only change the tense of the verb if the mood is subjunctive (such as "if I were you" instead of "if I was you"), only following prepositions like if.

not sure what you meant tho, so is this setup what you are talking about in reference to the mood?
I demand you to give me back my.... (indicative - straightforward)
I demand that you give me back... (subjunctive - not as straightforward)

I do know that in spanish the second phrase is changed into subjunctive tense (which is a lot more obvious of a change than in english).

could you clarify x2suresh?
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2008, 04:44
OA is D.

You are correct that this is a subjunctive mood (demand THAT, request THAT, etc.). My fault was thinking that "consumers" was the object in the sentence and therefore required the object pronoun "whom". Does anyone have a useful trick for determining the Subject/Object in a sentence? Any good way to determine whether to use "who" versus "whom"?? Here's another example of matching the correct pronoun form with the corresponding antecedent (OA below):

OG 10, #194. Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

A. one who
B. one of them who
C. and one of them who
D. one of whom
E. one of which





OA is D

In this example "one" is the object. So it requires the object form pronoun of "who" which is "whom". I ended up getting this one right but didn't know whether to match "who" with "presenters" (which is the subject) or "one" (which is the object). Ugh!
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2008, 06:45
raconteur wrote:
OA is D.

You are correct that this is a subjunctive mood (demand THAT, request THAT, etc.). My fault was thinking that "consumers" was the object in the sentence and therefore required the object pronoun "whom". Does anyone have a useful trick for determining the Subject/Object in a sentence? Any good way to determine whether to use "who" versus "whom"?? Here's another example of matching the correct pronoun form with the corresponding antecedent (OA below):

OG 10, #194. Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

A. one who
B. one of them who
C. and one of them who
D. one of whom
E. one of which





OA is D

In this example "one" is the object. So it requires the object form pronoun of "who" which is "whom". I ended up getting this one right but didn't know whether to match "who" with "presenters" (which is the subject) or "one" (which is the object). Ugh!
Why "One" is OBJECT ?? Can you explain in details.


This is how I eliminated other options and chose option D.

OG 10, #194. Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.
A. one who
Presenters, one who is blind --> not make sense.. Presenters -- plural, one who --> singular.
Presenter, one who is blind ---> would have been correct.

B. one of them who
Presenters, one of them who is blind --> its little ambigous.. who refers to one of them, or them...
Presenters, one of them is blind --> looks ok for me.
C. and one of them who
D. one of whom
Presenters, one of whom is blind
one is subject .. is.. verb
whom is object of preposition "of" so we need "objective form of who"

E. one of which

Comments welcome
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Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2008, 09:42
x2suresh wrote:
raconteur wrote:
OA is D.

You are correct that this is a subjunctive mood (demand THAT, request THAT, etc.). My fault was thinking that "consumers" was the object in the sentence and therefore required the object pronoun "whom". Does anyone have a useful trick for determining the Subject/Object in a sentence? Any good way to determine whether to use "who" versus "whom"?? Here's another example of matching the correct pronoun form with the corresponding antecedent (OA below):

OG 10, #194. Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

A. one who
B. one of them who
C. and one of them who
D. one of whom
E. one of which





OA is D

In this example "one" is the object. So it requires the object form pronoun of "who" which is "whom". I ended up getting this one right but didn't know whether to match "who" with "presenters" (which is the subject) or "one" (which is the object). Ugh!
Why "One" is OBJECT ?? Can you explain in details.


This is how I eliminated other options and chose option D.

OG 10, #194. Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.
A. one who
Presenters, one who is blind --> not make sense.. Presenters -- plural, one who --> singular.
Presenter, one who is blind ---> would have been correct.

B. one of them who
Presenters, one of them who is blind --> its little ambigous.. who refers to one of them, or them...
Presenters, one of them is blind --> looks ok for me.
C. and one of them who
D. one of whom
Presenters, one of whom is blind
one is subject .. is.. verb
whom is object of preposition "of" so we need "objective form of who"

E. one of which

Comments welcome



The reason "one" is the object is because the pronoun "whom" is in the object form. This is a question of Pronoun Case. In this example "one of" is the object. Therefore it must use "whom" rather than "who". "Who", in regards to Pronoun Case, is the subject form so can only refer back to a subject antecedent, which in this case is "presenters".

I find myself making mistakes on this whole WHO versus WHOM thing. It ultimately comes down to me not fully knowing what is the subject and what is the object of a sentence. :(
Re: SC: #142 from OG 10th Edition   [#permalink] 27 Aug 2008, 09:42
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