Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 02 Oct 2014, 05:14

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 09 Jul 2007
Posts: 1111
Location: London
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 0

In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2007, 16:51
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine mammal, has long been hunted for its meat. Having noted the manatee hunters’ expert knowledge of manatees’ habits, local conservationists are encouraging the hunters to stop hunting and instead to take tourists on boat rides to see manatees. Tourist interest is high, so the plan has promise of achieving the twin goals of giving the former hunters a good income and helping ensure the manatees’ survival.

Which of the following, if true, raises the most serious doubt about the plan’s chance of success?

A. Many tourists who visit these parts of the Caribbean are uninterested in manatees and would not be willing to pay what the former manatee hunters would have to charge for boat rides to see manatees.

B. Recovery of the species would enable some hunting to continue without putting the manatees’ survival in jeopardy again.

C. In areas where manatees have traditionally been hunted for food, local people could easily replace the manatee meat in their diets with other foods obtained from the sea.

D. There would not be enough former manatee hunters to act as guides for all the tourists who want to see manatees.

E. To maintain their current income, manatee hunters who switched to guiding tourists would have to use far larger boats and make many more trips into the manatees’ fragile habitat than they currently do.

OA: E
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 18 Oct 2007
Posts: 449
Location: USA
Schools: Tepper '11
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 56 [0], given: 2

 [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2007, 01:26
E? It's the only one that indicates problems with the plan even beginning, and even if it began, it could still damage the manatees.

A: many would not, and many would. irrelevant
B: "some" hunting doesn't replace full hunting income
c: Helps the conclusion, not raise doubts
D: not enough guides is good, they will make lots of money
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Posts: 65
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Re: CR [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2007, 04:10
Ravshonbek wrote:
In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine mammal, has long been hunted for its meat. Having noted the manatee hunters’ expert knowledge of manatees’ habits, local conservationists are encouraging the hunters to stop hunting and instead to take tourists on boat rides to see manatees. Tourist interest is high, so the plan has promise of achieving the twin goals of giving the former hunters a good income and helping ensure the manatees’ survival.

Which of the following, if true, raises the most serious doubt about the plan’s chance of success?

A. Many tourists who visit these parts of the Caribbean are uninterested in manatees and would not be willing to pay what the former manatee hunters would have to charge for boat rides to see manatees.

B. Recovery of the species would enable some hunting to continue without putting the manatees’ survival in jeopardy again.

C. In areas where manatees have traditionally been hunted for food, local people could easily replace the manatee meat in their diets with other foods obtained from the sea.

D. There would not be enough former manatee hunters to act as guides for all the tourists who want to see manatees.

E. To maintain their current income, manatee hunters who switched to guiding tourists would have to use far larger boats and make many more trips into the manatees’ fragile habitat than they currently do.

OA: E


Would also pick E by POE
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 09 Jul 2007
Posts: 1111
Location: London
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2007, 09:00
OA is E
thanks
  [#permalink] 10 Dec 2007, 09:00
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine akrish1982 6 14 Sep 2012, 02:24
In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine swbluedevil 23 21 Dec 2007, 14:22
3 In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine alimad 10 23 Sep 2007, 18:36
CR - Caribbean manatees dvtohir 18 09 Apr 2007, 22:28
In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine rkatl 10 09 Sep 2006, 19:42
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In parts of the Caribbean, the manatee, an endangered marine

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.