Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Sep 2014, 04:44

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Dec 2011
Posts: 24
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 16 [2] , given: 6

In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2013, 23:49
2
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

52% (03:14) correct 48% (02:15) wrong based on 125 sessions
In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was restricted to emergency procedures during a five-week period.
Mortality in these hospitals was found to have fallen by nearly one-third during the period. The number of deaths rose again when elective surgery (surgery that can be postponed) was resumed. It can be concluded that, before the five-week period, the risks of elective surgery had been incurred unnecessarily often in the area.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion above?

(A) The conditions for which elective surgery was performed would in the long run have been life-threatening, and surgery for them would have become riskier with time.
(B) The physicians planning elective surgery performed before the five-week period had fully informed the patients who would undergo it of the possible risks of the procedures.
(C) Before the suspension of elective surgery, surgical operations were performed in area hospitals at a higher rate, per thousand residents of the area, than was usual elsewhere.
(D) Elective surgery is, in general, less risky than is emergency surgery because the conditions requiring or indicating surgery are often less severe.
(E) Even if a surgical procedure is successful, the patient can die of a hospital-contracted infection with a bacterium that is resistant to antibiotic treatment.


Kudos if my post helped! :)
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

Kudos if the post helped! :)

The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night. -H.W. Longfellow

1 KUDOS received
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 1666
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance
GMAT 1: 710 Q48 V39
WE: Corporate Finance (Investment Banking)
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 164 [1] , given: 274

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2014, 05:19
1
This post received
KUDOS
notrandom wrote:
In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was restricted to emergency procedures during a five-week period.
Mortality in these hospitals was found to have fallen by nearly one-third during the period. The number of deaths rose again when elective surgery (surgery that can be postponed) was resumed. It can be concluded that, before the five-week period, the risks of elective surgery had been incurred unnecessarily often in the area.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion above?

(A) The conditions for which elective surgery was performed would in the long run have been life-threatening, and surgery for them would have become riskier with time.
(B) The physicians planning elective surgery performed before the five-week period had fully informed the patients who would undergo it of the possible risks of the procedures.
(C) Before the suspension of elective surgery, surgical operations were performed in area hospitals at a higher rate, per thousand residents of the area, than was usual elsewhere.
(D) Elective surgery is, in general, less risky than is emergency surgery because the conditions requiring or indicating surgery are often less severe.
(E) Even if a surgical procedure is successful, the patient can die of a hospital-contracted infection with a bacterium that is resistant to antibiotic treatment.


Kudos if my post helped! :)


Ok, let's see what's going on here. They first had this elective surgery and a high mortality rate. They suspended this elective ones and left only the riskier ones and mortality dropped. Therefore, the argument assumes that this elective ones were not necessary. We need to weaken this point.

Answer choice A does the best job here since it says that if these other elective procedures were not carried out the problem would aggravate and these patients would then need to undergo a riskier procedure in the future. This is in fact the best answer choice as it weakens the conclusion that these elective surgeries are unecessary.

I'm going to quickly go through the other answer choices:

(B) The physicians planning elective surgery performed before the five-week period had fully informed the patients who would undergo it of the possible risks of the procedures. OK so the patients know about the risks, so what?
(C) Before the suspension of elective surgery, surgical operations were performed in area hospitals at a higher rate, per thousand residents of the area, than was usual elsewhere. Why are we comparing rates between hospitals here? Totally out of scope
(D) Elective surgery is, in general, less risky than is emergency surgery because the conditions requiring or indicating surgery are often less severe. OK that is pretty obvious
(E) Even if a surgical procedure is successful, the patient can die of a hospital-contracted infection with a bacterium that is resistant to antibiotic treatment.Out of scope/Who cares?

Hope it helps
Cheers
J
Re: In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was   [#permalink] 06 Feb 2014, 05:19
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
3 In response to a high unemployment rate and to complaints skrishnakarthik 9 19 Oct 2013, 23:50
In response to growing demand for high-end vehicles, the ps_dahiya 6 16 Jul 2006, 19:11
Hospital Z has a high percentage of follow up surgeries. Praetorian 15 02 Jul 2006, 14:57
In 1966 the operative mortality rate in open heart surgery NTLancer 3 08 Apr 2006, 15:29
In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was giddi77 16 03 Jan 2006, 20:16
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In response to high mortality in area hospitals, surgery was

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.