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In stating the argument that the President does not care

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In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2009, 02:26
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Question Stats:

37% (01:45) correct 63% (00:44) wrong based on 378 sessions
In stating the argument that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.

(A) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
(B) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about the poor.
(C) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
(D) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about it.
(E) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about it.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2009, 03:46
I think E, because "it" refers back to plight.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2009, 09:19
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Will go with E

While stating one can 'imply' not 'infer'
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2009, 23:05
I also think its B. What's the OA?
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 00:59
I am going out of the herd.

C for me.

Them refers back to poor. What else it can refer to in the sentence.

And I think logically the implication should be that democrats do not care about the poor.( not plight ). Its like giving a specific example and deducing something general. Its not ideal to refer back the specific example in the general implication.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 04:55
Hi mates,

IMO E

A out: what's the reference of "them"? its refrence (the plight of the poor) is singular
B out: same reason, it should be "about the plight of the poor"
C out: same as in A

Now, between D and E, I think that E fits better, i.e. implied is better and therefore D changes the meaning

OA and Source?

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 05:51
rampuria wrote:
In stating the argument that the President
does not care about the plight of the
poor, a prominent Democrat inferred that
Republicans have never been concerned
about them
.
(A) a prominent Democrat inferred that
Republicans have never been concerned
about them.
(B) a prominent Democrat inferred that
Republicans have never been concerned
about the poor.
(C) a prominent Democrat implied that
Republicans have never been concerned
about them.
(D) a prominent Democrat inferred that
Republicans have never been concerned
about it.
(E) a prominent Democrat implied that
Republicans have never been concerned
about it.




it is ambigous .. "it" can refer to "argument" or plight
D,E are out.

"them" --> refers to what... no antecedent.
A and C are out.

inferred --> To conclude from evidence or premises(argument)
implied --> to express or indicate indirectly..

Clearly inferred make sense here.. Its clearly.. concluding from the previous "argument"/premise..



One more vote to B

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 06:02
OA is E

NOTICE THE SUBTLE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IMPLIED AND INFERRED. "IT" CORRECTLY REFERES TO PLIGHT

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2009, 18:04
glad to see it was E.

E was my original choice and I held out hope while scrolling down.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 05:35
I could narrow down to D or E as 'it' refers to the plight of the poor, not the poor themselves. But why is it implied over inferred? Shouldn't we use D as it is in the original sentence?

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 06:22
I just made this mistake but it can't be B because the poor is a modifier modifying plight so the pronoun can not be poor it must be plight so B and A and C are gone and between D and E, well I don't think thats a fair split but E
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 07:16
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I fell for B too..

But the below explanation should help. The keyword in the sentence is "stating"

In stating the argument that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about it [plight].

Quote:
First, it's an imply vs. infer issue. If you are doing the talking, you are implying. If you are listening, then you are inferring.
So the Democrat is implying, ruling out A, B, and D

At issue is an opinion about the PLIGHT of the poor and plight is a thing, an "it" not a "them". Republicans were never concerned about the PLIGHT. That, along with the previous opinion that them can be ambigous anyway, makes me say (E)
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 09:13
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Corerct Verb is Imply..as the speaker himself trying to conclude. Infer is when someone makes a statement and another person tries to conclude or sum it up.
In this case the person is the same. So "imply" should be used.

so choice narrows to C and E.
Difference is "them" and "it" at the end.

The antecedent is plight of the poor not poor for the pronoun..
So "it" is the proper pronoun.

answer is E
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 09:23
to "imply" is to suggest something without stating it explicitly

did not care about the plight of the poor / not to be concerned about the plight of the poor --- to me almost seem to be the same thing and the Democrat wouldn't have had to "imply" the latter by saying the former

I like C better --- by stating that the President didnt care about the plight of the poor, the Democrat implied and meant to say that Republicans have never been concerned about the Democrats (i.e., the Democrats truly represent the poor)...
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2010, 23:28
I had marked B but then on second thoughts E is the correct one,

the statement does not refer to the poor it refers to the "plight of the poor" so the IT at the end becomes the best suitable verb....Am not clear on the infer and imply debate both can be used in this context so the IT was the clincher for me...
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 01:02
Isn't the idiom "infer from"? Then A, B, D would be "out" quickly. The rest is clear as "it" refers to "plight".

=> E
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 02:35
infer cannot be used in this context -- to infer is to deduce something. The Democrat was making the argument so he could only have "implied" something, i.e., suggested something without putting it expressly in words; he could not have "inferred" somthing in the context - it doesn't make sense

of the lot of answers with "implied - C and E --- E to me does not make that much sense = why would he be "implying" something by almost stating the same thing by way of a near-synonymous expression - to not care about / to not be concerned are almost the same thing

You can say: "X is an integer implies that X is not a negative fraction" -- its unstated; it works well

But will you ever say: When I said I love you I implied that I really like you! No, both of them are too close - and say the same thing... you are not "implying"

With C - the "them" at the end refers to the Democrats --- so the implication in the Democrat's statement is that the Democrats stand for the poor - and when the Prez does not care about the plight of one, he isn't concerned about the other...
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 04:31
gmat1011 wrote:
But will you ever say: When I said I love you I implied that I really like you! No, both of them are too close - and say the same thing... you are not "implying"


I wouldn't rely too much on what you "will ever say"; that's very dangerous in GMAT terms. The sentence can sound terribly weired, but is correct.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 06:14
well, be that as it may, usage of 'implied' is not correct in this sentence in option E.

you can't just focus on pure grammar rules and lose sight of the meaning of words.

And this question is not from a past GMAT exam. I am not sure where it is from.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2010, 07:34
So, what do you suggest? (even if it's not original GMAT)

"it" makes the correct reference to "plight"; it can't be "them", as "the plight of the poor" is one object phrase. This would rule out all but D, E. Now, that you have called "E" into question, would leave you with "D". Right?
Re: SC-Democrat   [#permalink] 13 Aug 2010, 07:34
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