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In stating the arugment that the President does not care

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Director
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In stating the arugment that the President does not care [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 05:36
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A
B
C
D
E

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100% (01:35) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
In stating the arugment that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.

A) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.

B) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about the poor.

C) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about them.

D) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about it.

E) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about it.

Questions:

- I have some questions about the antecedent/pronoun and after people post their answers i'll ask my questions. Didnt want to be a killjoy and post my question/OA directly.

Last edited by gmataquaguy on 19 Jul 2004, 07:20, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 05:58
A is my ans. It has nothing wrong.

But I don't know what is wrong with C either. "implied" might be better than "inferred" for the above statement. But that would change the meaning of the sentence.

In A and C "them" refers correctly to "the poor". "The President" and "a prominent democrat" are both singular.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 06:34
(A) it is,

(C) changes the meaning of sentence by using implied, when you state something you infer from it rather than imply from it.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 06:54
I think it is C.

When you say something others infer and you imply. I may be wrong. Please suggest.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 07:22
Sorry guys i just changed answer choice E. It should have originally read "implied" not inferred.

My apologies for the confusion caused. I reverified that all other choices have the right verbage (implied Vs infered)
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 07:56
The OA is "E" [please note that in my original post i changed "E" from "inferred" to "implied".

Implied should be used because you dont "infer" from your own argument [you infer from someone else's arguement].

This narrows down the choice between "C" and "E".

My question:

1) Answer Choice C uses the pronoun "them"; Answer Choice E uses "it".

How do we know what the antecedent. For example: it could be either be "plight" or be "poor". If the antecedent were "plight" i'd use "it". If the antecedent were "poor" i'd use "them".

But the OA is E. In my opinion both "about the plight" and "of the poor" can be used as a prepositional phrase in which case the "noun" of the other phrase becomes the antecedent. I'm just totally stumped........
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 08:22
aftr a long battle I go with E...


reasonz: one , one says and ''implies'' whereas others ''infer'' from what one says....

two the thing we are supposed view as the subject here is ''THE PLIGHT'' n not the ''POOR''

there is not much confusiuon here ( U don have to confud) if U know that the ''aspect''' being talked here is ''the plight'' of the poor and not the ''poor'' themselves...

yes this is a tricky 'stunt'but I guess if we re -read and eliminate on the basis of ''infer''and ''Imply' we have better luck of beating this.

hope that helps...

have fun :)
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 11:56
"there is not much confusiuon here ( U don have to confud) if U know that the ''aspect''' being talked here is ''the plight'' of the poor and not the ''poor'' themselves..."

Can you elaborate on what you mean by "aspect being talked here". I'm not sure that i understand.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 05:24
E

?it? refers to ?the plight? and ?implied? in much better than ?inferred?
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 05:39
I think the subject is neither plicht, not poor, but 'plight of the poor'.

Can I be right???
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 05:42
E it is

first off inferred doesnt make sense so it has to be either C or E
Since the sentence refers to the plight of the poor , the sentence should refer to it as "it" and not them "them"
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 08:54
smandalika wrote:
E it is

first off inferred doesnt make sense so it has to be either C or E
Since the sentence refers to the plight of the poor , the sentence should refer to it as "it" and not them "them"


I agree with the "implied" part,but not with the sentence using "it".

The repuplicans are not concerned about the "poor". That is what the sentence is trying to say.

Let us compare the following two sentences.

a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about [the poor].
a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about [the plight of the poor].

Going by the word "implies", I feel C is right.


Just FYI
plight :
a condition or state of affairs; esp., now, an awkward, sad, or dangerous situation
—SYN PREDICAMENT,impasse, dilemma, situation, tight situation;
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 09:04
Hi...

gmatquaguy...

what I meant by the ''aspect'' here is the subject or the main concern of the line....

abisurd sounds a little better than i .. when he says the subject here is neither the ''plight'' nor the ''poor'' but rather ''the plight of the poor'' :) but I wish to opine that ''pight'' itself means or again implies that IT -the plight , is of the poor and of no one else ...

however ... I would like to ''IMPLY'' here that subject is plight( of the poor ) and that is the only way we get to have the right pronoun referent... and U people can certainly ''infer'' from what I said ...


ash, I believe the second ex: that u gave is equally fine..do I need some correctin ?let me know...

hope that helps!

Have fun :)
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2004, 10:54
enigmatic007 wrote:
Hi...

ash, I believe the second ex: that u gave is equally fine..do I need some correctin ?let me know...


So we are battling between E and C ;)

Here are the two complete sentences.

C. In stating the arugment that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about [the poor]/[them].

E. In stating the arugment that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about [the plight of the poor]/[it].

Now maybe I am thinking too much,but I am just trying to argue to add a point in favor of C.

If we go with E :
<<If the democrat says that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, he implies that the Republicans have never been concerned about the plight of the poor. >>

My opinion here is that there is no implication at all if the second part of the sentence addresses "plight of the poor" again.

But if the "poor" is addressed in the second part of the sentence, there is an implication made.

Let me know what you think of this.
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  [#permalink] 20 Jul 2004, 10:54
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