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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many

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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2012, 23:20
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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or
commercial districts.
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those
along the waterfront.

How C can be the answer and D not?
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2012, 23:25
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D is out of scope whether lots are available doesnt alters anything in the argument from the viewpoint of profits etc.

C is the clear winner.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2012, 09:56
Having lots available doesn't really contribute directly to the making a large profit.
Profit depends on the homeowners if they are willing to buy.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 08 May 2012, 21:29
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cangetgmat wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or
commercial districts
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase--
E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those
along the waterfront.

How C can be the answer and D not?



If people are willing to purchase properties in those areas, only then it would be beneficial for the developers who would be building the residential buildings on those places where residential lots were there.

The answer is not D.
Reason--> Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. These properties are already available, so developer would not be benefitted in any way.And according to the stem the developers are to make profits. How could they make profits? Clearly if the People are willing to purchase properties in those areas, the developers would buy the lots and build buildings over those places and thus would earn huge profits.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 22 May 2012, 11:51
cangetgmat wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or
commercial districts.
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those
along the waterfront.

How C can be the answer and D not?



My Explanation:
Money power doesn't make anyone buy the properties which was considered undesirable earlier so A is out.
B doesn't make any sense.
E is opposite of the of is stated in the paragraph.
D is not correct choice as people are willing to buy waterfront sited because they are prestigious and willing to pay higher price for the same and not because lots of it are available.
C supports the argument that people are willing to spend large sums in industrial or commercial districts which are not in waterfront.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2012, 07:31
dexerash wrote:
cangetgmat wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or
commercial districts.
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those
along the waterfront.

How C can be the answer and D not?



My Explanation:
Money power doesn't make anyone buy the properties which was considered undesirable earlier so A is out.
B doesn't make any sense.
E is opposite of the of is stated in the paragraph.
D is not correct choice as people are willing to buy waterfront sited because they are prestigious and willing to pay higher price for the same and not because lots of it are available.
C supports the argument that people are willing to spend large sums in industrial or commercial districts which are not in waterfront.

Can you please explain why option B doesn't makes sense.. Thanks
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2012, 01:57
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Conclusion = A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives. => This is clearly out of scope because it does not relate to the developer's profits. This is only about the policy of the Coastal city in order to develop their own cities.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts. => If homeowners are ready to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts (this is belong to the waterfront) => strengthen the argument
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. => the developer will not profit from the waterfront.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2012, 09:14
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If you rephrase C it will be read as "home owners willing to spend on beach front properties". We know that beach front properties are traditionally for industrial or commercial districts.
If anyone wants to make large profit, one of the assumption is there are enough buyers for the property. C supports that.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2012, 11:17
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narangvaibhav wrote:
cangetgmat wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or
commercial districts.
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those
along the waterfront.

How C can be the answer and D not?



Can you please explain why option B doesn't makes sense.. Thanks
On the GMAT, "Many" means "More than one." It's entirely possible that many--or even most--cities are not offering such discounts! Regardless, the conclusion in the prompt doesn't make any qualifications about when or where it is wise to buy such properties, just that it is wise to do so; tax incentives, especially tax incentives limited in location to who-knows-how-few cities, are out of scope.
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2012, 08:57
Straight C.

If possible are willing to buy houses in former industrial and commercial locations, the plan will succeed.
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Re: coastal American cities [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2012, 19:12
tuanquang269 wrote:
Conclusion = A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

B. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives. => This is clearly out of scope because it does not relate to the developer's profits. This is only about the policy of the Coastal city in order to develop their own cities.
C. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts. => If homeowners are ready to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts (this is belong to the waterfront) => strengthen the argument
D. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. => the developer will not profit from the waterfront.


Hi but aren't you making a logical fallacy in choosing E. if all A( water front properties) is B(industrial zones) then all B is A. Although a buyer is interested in industrial properties, it may be so that he does not want it next to any body of water.

Although B is fishy, it shows that developers can make large profits by cutting tax costs. On the other hand, the passage also states the premise that people are interested in buying shore front properties.

I think the OA is debatable

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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2012, 00:54
A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

I strongly feel that correct answer is A, Conclusion says the developers are going to make profit of the tower, which if they erect near to beach.

We need to strengthen the fact that if the tower is erected it will be bought by people and Option states that people now have more money to spend on real estate.

It is aslo assumed in the passage that People tend to like real estate project which has aesthetic value, the passage than states that these beach front projects will have more aesthetic.

Hence if people have more money they are going to spend whatever asked by the developer, which will accrue profit to the developers.


Only gap here is " How much money will these developers charge?"
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2014, 22:47
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many   [#permalink] 30 Jun 2014, 22:47
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