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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many

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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 03 Jun 2007, 18:23
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100% (03:43) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?


People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.

Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.

Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.

Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2007, 10:58
D provides the added incentive for developers
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2007, 11:04
B. It states that there is a demand for waterfront homes in industrial or commercial districts.
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2007, 12:14
B
thought for D also....bur one sense its weakening the argument.
If tax incentives are given to the developer then it may be possibe that the land prices may decrease.
but again its all depends on developer if he wants just a fixed profit percentage from his investment. :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2007, 12:43
B

if homeowners are willing to pay for such properties, developers are certain to make a profit as the statement claims
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2007, 13:04
B.

1. Developer can make profit only if, homeowners buy those apartments.
2. Watrefont is now attractive for prestigious issue.

B states clearly whereas D never clears idea about homeowners.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2007, 09:32
B simply restates what is there in the stem without adding anything further to strengthen. Whats the OA
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2007, 10:34
dahcrap wrote:
B simply restates what is there in the stem without adding anything further to strengthen. Whats the OA


I vote for D.

The stem is about the developer or Home builder and how he makes profits...
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2007, 10:47
baski6 wrote:
dahcrap wrote:
B simply restates what is there in the stem without adding anything further to strengthen. Whats the OA


I vote for D.

The stem is about the developer or Home builder and how he makes profits...


While tax incentives would certainly help make greater profits, they are not a sufficient condition for profits. For example: what if there there was zero demand for the houses? Then even with the tax incentives there is no opportunity for profit. Demand for the houses is a necessary condition for profits, hence answer B.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2007, 15:54
Baer,

But the stem already says that ppl have a high demand for houses why repeat it to strengthen it
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2007, 03:05
I think it is B

If homeowners are willing to spend money on residential properities on the waterfront, then a developer whoerect residential buildings on waterfront might be successful.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2007, 03:37
(D) weakens the argument, since less demand then more supply. (B) correctly follows the conlusion and is therefore the correct answer. cheers
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2014, 02:24
What is the source of this question ? I find none of the option logical
Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many   [#permalink] 17 Jun 2014, 02:24
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