Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Sep 2014, 22:49

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 477
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 51 [0], given: 4

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2010, 19:04
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

63% (02:11) correct 38% (00:55) wrong based on 45 sessions
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
_________________

-Underline your question. It takes only a few seconds!
-Search before you post.

1 KUDOS received
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1077
Location: United States
Followers: 122

Kudos [?]: 1289 [1] , given: 120

Premium Member
Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 23:02
1
This post received
KUDOS
vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


KEY is: the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce ==> New residential buildings should be built on the waterfront that used to be industry and commerce districts.

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
Wrong. Out of scope.

2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
Correct. A developer can make profit ONLY IF customers are willing to pay for properties used to be industrial or commercial districts. If Customers are not willing to pay, a developer's plan will fail.

3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
Wrong. Shell game. What if there are many available lots but nobody wants to buy?

4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
Wrong. Out of scope.

5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
Wrong. Out of scope

Hope it helps.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMV Chief of Design.

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2009
Posts: 367
Schools: LBS, INSEAD, IMD, ISB - Anything with just 1 yr program.
Followers: 14

Kudos [?]: 99 [0], given: 22

GMAT Tests User
Re: coastal american cities [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2010, 19:52
vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries. - more money, relatively speaking, not discussed in the stimulus.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts. - goes hand-in-hand with the statement - "waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front."
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. - we don't know about this, we only know that it is industrial and commercial space.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives. - tax incentives are not discussed, careful not to assume.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront. - weakens actually, if interior spaces are more expensive, real estate developers won't be looking at waterfront properties.

_________________

I am AWESOME and it's gonna be LEGENDARY!!!

SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 17 Feb 2010
Posts: 1561
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 211 [0], given: 6

Re: coastal american cities [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2010, 07:09
my pick is (B)

In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

a)People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
>>> This does not effect property developers profit

b)Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
>>> Since homeowners are willing to spend large sums on residential properties in industrial district, it is likely that developers will make profits by making buildings on those properties because as per the premise waterfront properties were taken by industry and commerce

c)Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
>>> This does not effect property developers profit

d)Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
>>> Tax incentives are no where mentioned in premise

e)Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
>>> out of scope
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 100
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 0

Re: coastal american cities [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 10:38
My take is C. What is the OA?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Aug 2009
Posts: 437
Schools: UT at Austin, Indiana State University, UC at Berkeley
WE 1: 5.5
WE 2: 5.5
WE 3: 6.0
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 48 [0], given: 16

GMAT Tests User
Re: coastal american cities [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 20:31
OA is B, it is from OG, if i am not mistaken...
_________________

Never give up,,,

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 62
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 28

Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 00:25
pqhai wrote:
vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


KEY is: the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce ==> New residential buildings should be built on the waterfront that used to be industry and commerce districts.

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
Wrong. Out of scope.

2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
Correct. A developer can make profit ONLY IF customers are willing to pay for properties used to be industrial or commercial districts. If Customers are not willing to pay, a developer's plan will fail.

3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
Wrong. Shell game. What if there are many available lots but nobody wants to buy?

4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
Wrong. Out of scope.

5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
Wrong. Out of scope

Hope it helps.



The conclusion is :A developer who wishes to make a large profit invests in waterfront.

So our strengthening argument must be supporting this statement. My pick is D.

It is telling that the agents will make more money out of the deal'
as far the B is concerned : it is just restating the premise :Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front.


Please discuss :)
and please post the OA and OE.



If you learnt anything from my post, Press KUDOS
After all, KUDOS is a great way to encourage the complete community. :-D
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 1666
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance
GMAT 1: 710 Q48 V39
WE: Corporate Finance (Investment Banking)
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 164 [0], given: 274

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 29 Sep 2013, 11:46
pqhai wrote:
vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


KEY is: the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce ==> New residential buildings should be built on the waterfront that used to be industry and commerce districts.

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
Wrong. Out of scope.

2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
Correct. A developer can make profit ONLY IF customers are willing to pay for properties used to be industrial or commercial districts. If Customers are not willing to pay, a developer's plan will fail.

3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
Wrong. Shell game. What if there are many available lots but nobody wants to buy?

4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
Wrong. Out of scope.

5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
Wrong. Out of scope

Hope it helps.


You know... I picked B first but then I thought how they talked about making a large profit as a conclusion based on the evidence that large sums were being paid, so I thought that we needed to find an option that would not make costs increase or at least be stable so that we could conclude that, so the only option that seemed to fit was D....

I've seen the Revenues-Profit trick a couple of times, I its pretty common on CR passages especially 700-800

Cheers
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 30 Sep 2013, 00:28
Hi, This tread is awesome for me....Thanks...
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Posts: 29
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 22

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2014, 16:36
I'm still not convinced between B and D and from the above posts, I'm not alone in this respect. I learned CR based off PowerScore, so this is a 'Strengthen' question, right? Thus, the answer choices are assumed so it doesn't matter that tax incentives aren't mentioned in the passage. We simply need to identify an answer that strengthens the conclusion, which is: A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

I can see how B is correct, but I already see this mentioned in the passage. IE, "as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front." So, since large sums have been paid, they were clearly willing to pay the large sums (unless they were forced).

In terms of D, tax incentives lead to a higher profit, which strengthens the argument in my opinion.
_________________

Please +1 KUDOS if my post helps. Thank you.

Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many   [#permalink] 05 Apr 2014, 16:36
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Like many other 18th-century mathematicians who compiled macjas 4 03 Jun 2012, 22:00
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many cangetgmat 12 01 Apr 2012, 23:20
19th century GMAT LGOdream 0 24 Aug 2011, 05:02
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many mm007 12 03 Jun 2007, 18:23
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many karlfurt 22 30 Oct 2006, 03:33
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.