Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 18 Apr 2014, 12:44

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In the figure above, what is the value of X? (See attached

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
Joined: 13 Dec 2005
Posts: 64
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

In the figure above, what is the value of X? (See attached [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2006, 15:53
In the figure above, what is the value of X? (See attached file for image)

A) 55
B) 60
C) 65
D) 70
E) 75
Attachments

shape.png
shape.png [ 10.5 KiB | Viewed 695 times ]

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2005
Posts: 254
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2006, 17:39
x = 70

the 2 right Tirangles resolve to sides of side 5 making it an isocles triange.

x = 180 - 55*2 = 70
Manager
Manager
Joined: 13 Dec 2005
Posts: 64
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Triangles [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2006, 19:08
Thanks for your replies. It seems I didn't get the memo on the whole 3:4:5 5:12:13 triangle subject. Does it matter which sides have the 3 the 4 or the 5 or as long as you see 2 of the the three and a ninety degree angle can you assume it is a 3:4:5 triangle?

Thanks,
Jim
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2005
Posts: 730
Location: Madrid
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Triangles [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2006, 06:29
ellisje22 wrote:
Thanks for your replies. It seems I didn't get the memo on the whole 3:4:5 5:12:13 triangle subject. Does it matter which sides have the 3 the 4 or the 5 or as long as you see 2 of the the three and a ninety degree angle can you assume it is a 3:4:5 triangle?

Thanks,
Jim

Yes it matters which side have the 3 the 4 or the 5 or as long as you see 2 of the the three and a ninety degree angle can you assume it is a 3:4:5 triangle?the if two shorter side have lenghts 3 and 4 the other ll be 5
but if you have one short leg 3 and other short leg 5 the third leg(the longest one)won't be 4))
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 04 Oct 2005
Posts: 587
Location: Chicago
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2006, 22:13
Simple one..Its 180-2*55(an isosceles triangle)=70
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 20 Sep 2005
Posts: 1023
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2006, 23:47
5:12:13 and 3:4:5 makes the two sides of the interior triangle as 5. The opposite angles are 55 and the x = 180 - ( 55*2) = 70.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 28 Dec 2005
Posts: 83
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Triangles [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2006, 00:47
You could also solve the sides of the triangles using X^2=Y^2+Z^2 and get 5 as a side for the 5:12:13 Triangle.

ellisje22 wrote:
Thanks for your replies. It seems I didn't get the memo on the whole 3:4:5 5:12:13 triangle subject. Does it matter which sides have the 3 the 4 or the 5 or as long as you see 2 of the the three and a ninety degree angle can you assume it is a 3:4:5 triangle?

Thanks,
Jim
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 5253
Followers: 21

Kudos [?]: 110 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User Reviews Badge
 [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2006, 02:58
Memorize the special GMAT triangles. Especially 3-4-5 and 5-12-13. That is exactly what this problem is testing. If you have to use the p-theorem, then you have made a mistake somewhere.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 19 Jul 2005
Posts: 67
Location: Atlanta
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2006, 08:44
Can some one please explain these rules? 3-4-5 5-12-13???

Thanks!
  [#permalink] 10 Jan 2006, 08:44
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
New posts 2 Experts publish their posts in the topic What is the value of x+y in the figure above? Baten80 3 08 Mar 2011, 13:16
New posts 4 In the figure shown (see the attachment), what is the value sdrandom1 6 27 Jun 2009, 19:40
Popular new posts 4 Experts publish their posts in the topic In the figure above, what is the value of x + y ? Walkabout 12 18 Dec 2012, 05:08
New posts 8 In the figure above, what is the value of x? emmak 4 25 Mar 2013, 21:57
New posts 1 Experts publish their posts in the topic In the figure above, what is the value of x? fozzzy 4 03 Sep 2013, 23:44
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the figure above, what is the value of X? (See attached

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.