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In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the

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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2014, 19:09
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gauravkaushik8591 wrote:
Lucky i got this answer right. But i have a very fundamental question. I was stuck between C and D. Reason being that C states 'Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees' and i just couldn't understand how would pollinating a fruit that has been pollinated by bees help? as in, isn't it already pollinated?

Sorry for such a basic question but i was very close to picking C over D for this reason.


I understand your confusion. The intent of the option is that can humans pollinate the fruit which, till now, has been pollinated by bees?
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2014, 20:33
Option B makes more sense to me...
According to me option B should be correct..
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2015, 21:05
still it is not clear that how D is the answer , B looks very promising .
what is happening in chile and newzeland has nothing to do with united states .
if we are assuming that there are only 3 countries : united states , chile and newzeland , that supply these fruits then yes 'B' is a relevant question.
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In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2015, 22:11
IMO.. the Answer should be A. Reason being... the stimulus says .. "Honeybees are the primary pollinators f".. that means it has been factored in that there are other insects as well which act as secondary pollinators; however primary ones are honeybees.... This makes the first question redundant because by the construct itself we know that there are other insects which act as pollinators. Since still the stimulus stresses upon that a decline in Honeybee population would lead to decline in fruit production, its evident that however number of other insects, however impact they may have is immaterial to production quantities of the fruits..

Now If the stimulus didn't know about other insects.. then it would have given a plain statement that .. honeybees are pollinators.. and if they knew they are the only ones then they would have used "Only pollinators".. Primary pollinators does mean that there are secondary pollinators.
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 19 Apr 2015, 22:23
If you look at C Closely

Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?

How does it matter if Fruits are pollinated by humans or bees ... crops need to be pollinated by bees or humans not fruits ... Hence i think C should be the answer
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2015, 05:11
should be D

Lets analyse the argument:

Two reason given:
1. the increasing use of pesticides
2. two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees

Now D says Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?

reduce the use of pesticide --> yes ---> even if it reversing the decline in honeybee population, there is another factor - mites, we don't know the proportion of second factor involved in the matter. what if mites decreases the population of honeybee so we can't be sure

same with No
so ultimately can not help and that because of two factors involved in honeybee population.
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 08 May 2015, 03:10
nelz007 wrote:
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the United States has been cut in half. The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees. Honeybees are the primary pollinators for a variety of important fruit crops, including oranges, apples, grapes, peaches, cranberries and watermelons. Therefore, if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful to answer?

A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee?
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand?
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination?


I would go With D.

Here we are concerned with whether fruits will be available to consumers or not.

A- If we have insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops then yes bees are not required.
We get fruits. So yes/no will have an impact.

B- If we say no the population is not declining, then fruits will be available and can always be imported and consumed.
So fruits will be available to consumers.

C- If humans can hand pollinate, we don't require bees and we get fruits.

E- Again if it is possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants,we don't care about the bees we get Fruits.

In all the above options we can conclude whether concerned with whether fruits will be available to consumers or not.

Now lets look at D

D- It says whether reducing the use of pesticides would reverse the decline in honeybee populations.

We cannot be very sure of this because the problem statement says

The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees.

Now if you see the bold part it clearly says that only pesticides are not responsible, reducing the pesticides might reverse the decline in honeybee populations or even might not because we have the mites who are also capable of doing the damage.

So this question isn't helping much.
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2015, 18:27
Hello,

Well answer (D) is very well explained by Veritas Prep and indeed it is very important concept for GMAT.

But what about (B). It is mentioned in explanation that (B) is helpful in evaluating the conclusion because it could be "Alternate method to get fruits" but how:

- First there is no evidence in the argument to suggest that there are vegetables/fruits import in US from NZ and CH.
- Secondly argument clearly mention about ONLY US

(B) could be considered if the argument specified "Decreased availability for consumers around the world"

Any experts thoughts on this please?

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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2015, 00:46
vikasbansal227 wrote:
Hello,

Well answer (D) is very well explained by Veritas Prep and indeed it is very important concept for GMAT.

But what about (B). It is mentioned in explanation that (B) is helpful in evaluating the conclusion because it could be "Alternate method to get fruits" but how:

- First there is no evidence in the argument to suggest that there are vegetables/fruits import in US from NZ and CH.
- Secondly argument clearly mention about ONLY US

(B) could be considered if the argument specified "Decreased availability for consumers around the world"

Any experts thoughts on this please?

Thanks
Vikas



Hi

The argument does mention ONLY US but does it make conclusion ONLY for US :-D :-D :-D :-D :-D
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2015, 00:57
samichange

Well conclusion does not clearly indicate to broaden the scope to include "Non US" locations either?

Unless EXPLICITLY stated we can not assume that it include Non US locations.
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2015, 21:06
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vikasbansal227 wrote:
Hello,

Well answer (D) is very well explained by Veritas Prep and indeed it is very important concept for GMAT.

But what about (B). It is mentioned in explanation that (B) is helpful in evaluating the conclusion because it could be "Alternate method to get fruits" but how:

- First there is no evidence in the argument to suggest that there are vegetables/fruits import in US from NZ and CH.
- Secondly argument clearly mention about ONLY US

(B) could be considered if the argument specified "Decreased availability for consumers around the world"

Any experts thoughts on this please?

Thanks
Vikas


Note that the question asks you this: "In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful?"

None of the other four options will actually give you an alternative method of fruit or pollination. They will only HELP you in evaluating an alternative.

(B) asks "Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions?" If you answer "No", then another question could be "Can fruits be imported from these regions?" and so on... (B) is a step towards evaluating an alternative means of obtaining fruit. It is a useful question.

The other options are also steps towards evaluating alternative means of obtaining fruit or alternative means of pollination.

(D) provides no help in evaluating the conclusion and hence is "LEAST" useful (another way of saying "Not useful" because you cannot judge the relative utility of options).
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Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the   [#permalink] 14 Jun 2015, 21:06

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