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In the past the country of Siduria has relied heavily on

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In the past the country of Siduria has relied heavily on [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2007, 15:27
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In the past the country of Siduria has relied heavily on imported oil. Siduria recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. Siduria already produces more natural gas each year than it burns, and oil production in Sidurian oil fields is increasing at a steady pace. If these trends in fuel production and usage continue, therefore, Sidurian reliance on foreign sources for fuel should decline soon.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

A. In Siduria the rate of fuel consumption is rising no more quickly than the rate of fuel production.

B. Domestic production of natural gas is rising faster than is domestic production of oil in Siduria.

C. No fuel other than natural gas is expected to be used as a replacement for oil in Siduria.

D. Buildings cannot be heated by solar energy rather than by oil or natural gas.

E. All new homes that are being built will have natural-gas-burning heating systems.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2007, 16:13
B for me .
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Re: CR-Siduria [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2007, 19:51
A. In Siduria the rate of fuel consumption is rising no more quickly than the rate of fuel production.
Best answer. It is assumed that due to the new program the consumption will not grow at a faster pace than the production

B. Domestic production of natural gas is rising faster than is domestic production of oil in Siduria.
Argument doesn't depend on this, since the bottom line is how much fuel is consumed vs. produced

C. No fuel other than natural gas is expected to be used as a replacement for oil in Siduria.
Not relevant, other sources not part of the argument.

D. Buildings cannot be heated by solar energy rather than by oil or natural gas.
Not relevant.

E. All new homes that are being built will have natural-gas-burning heating systems.
Argument doesn't mention construction rate, or old homes vs. new homes.

A for me.
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Re: CR-Siduria [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2007, 21:09
empanado wrote:
A. In Siduria the rate of fuel consumption is rising no more quickly than the rate of fuel production.
Best answer. It is assumed that due to the new program the consumption will not grow at a faster pace than the production

B. Domestic production of natural gas is rising faster than is domestic production of oil in Siduria.
Argument doesn't depend on this, since the bottom line is how much fuel is consumed vs. produced

C. No fuel other than natural gas is expected to be used as a replacement for oil in Siduria.
Not relevant, other sources not part of the argument.

D. Buildings cannot be heated by solar energy rather than by oil or natural gas.
Not relevant.

E. All new homes that are being built will have natural-gas-burning heating systems.
Argument doesn't mention construction rate, or old homes vs. new homes.

A for me.


Agree with Empanado.

A -- Correctly takes care of the consumption and production of both types of fuel.

B, C and D - agree with Empanado's reasoning.

E - only targets the natural gas issue. The oil issue is still unresolved.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2007, 23:05
A. It tells us demand is not higher than supply, so there won't be a reliance on imports to meet any extra demand.
  [#permalink] 14 Jun 2007, 23:05
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In the past the country of Siduria has relied heavily on

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