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In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in

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In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2006, 08:10
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A
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C
D
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91% (01:42) correct 9% (00:43) wrong based on 22 sessions
In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation: sailors simply needed more highly accurate timepieces in order to compute their longitude form the positions of the stars.

A. not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation
B. being motivated by the practical matters of navigation, instead of complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as it has been recently
C. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, like they were more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation
D. motivated by the practical matters of navigation, not complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, which was the case more recently
E. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as has been the case more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation
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Re: SC - 11/28 : Sixteenth Century [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2006, 08:57
KC wrote:
In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation: sailors simply needed more highly accurate timepieces in order to compute their longitude form the positions of the stars.

A. not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation
B. being motivated by the practical matters of navigation, instead of complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as it has been recently
C. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, like they were more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation
D. motivated by the practical matters of navigation, not complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, which was the case more recently
E. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as has been the case more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation


"not by..but by" construction is needed.

C or E.

Like seems apporpriate here, as pronoun "they" is used here.

I would bet on C. :wink:
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Re: SC - 11/28 : Sixteenth Century [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2006, 15:26
KC wrote:
In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation: sailors simply needed more highly accurate timepieces in order to compute their longitude form the positions of the stars.


E. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as has been the case more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation


"E" for me too

not by... but by - paralel structure
+
"as" because of the verb "has" + "been"
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2006, 19:57
I'm always confused about the "true" definition of time. In physics, time is defined as the interval between two successive events. Now that definition doesn't work for me because before you define time you need to define "events" and that is not also the end of the problem; how do you define "succession" ? The conventional definition is "well understood" by Hawking and Einstein but I'm still searching for a better answer .... :lol:

By the way, answer to this petty SC problem which has hardly any important significance is E :lol:
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2006, 20:06
Am torn between (A) and (E). Will go for (A)

(B): "Being" --> Avoid answer choices with "being" in it at all cost!
(C): What does "they" refer to? Ambiguity
(D): Akward sentence structure
(E): Unsure about the "as has been the case more recently"

And there actual answer is.....
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Nov 2006, 12:15
E seems better than C .

as usage here is better than like.
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Re: In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2013, 10:27
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KC wrote:
In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation: sailors simply needed more highly accurate timepieces in order to compute their longitude from the positions of the stars.

A. not, like more recently, motivated by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, but the practical matters of navigation
B. being motivated by the practical matters of navigation, instead of complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as it has been recently
C. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, like they were more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation
D. motivated by the practical matters of navigation, not complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, which was the case more recently
E. motivated not by complicated philosophical questions about the nature of matter and the universe, as has been the case more recently, but by the practical matters of navigation

Common words in parallelism. Here's a blog on the topic:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/common-par ... orrection/
What the sentence is trying to say ....
[subject] is not motivated by P, but is motivated by Q
The proper way to condense, dropping the common words, is:
[subject] is motivated not by P, but by Q
It is incorrect to say:
[subject] is not motivated by P, but by Q
Putting the "not" in front of the verb "motivated" implies that the contrast will be between two verbs ---- "not motivated by X, but [some other verb]" Choice (A) makes this mistake.
We need the preposition "by" in both terms of the parallelism --- choices (A) & (B) & (D) all make this mistake. Choice (B) is also in the present progressive, which makes no sense. Here's a blog about the progressive tenses:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-verbs ... ive-tense/

That leaves (C) & (E).There are two big problems with (C).
(a) "like" is used for comparing nouns, and "as" is used for comparing actions, so "like they were more recently" ---- using "like" for an action --- is unacceptable by GMAT standards. Here's a blog about this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
(b) the pronoun "they" is incorrect. The antecedent is the subject of the sentence, "the push", which is singular --- this demands a singular pronoun.

For all these reasons, the only acceptable answer is (E).

Mike :-)
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Re: In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2013, 04:10
Just to confirm, In the sixteenth century is a verb modifier, right?

In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not motivated by ..............
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Re: In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2013, 13:51
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swati007 wrote:
Just to confirm, In the sixteenth century is a verb modifier, right?

In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in measuring time was not motivated by ..............

That's right. The prepositional phrase "In the sixteenth century" is a prepositional phrase that is acting as a adverbial phrase, that is to say, a verb modifier, because it answers the adverb-question "when?" See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... d-clauses/

Mike :-)
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Re: In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2014, 14:26
"not by..but by" construction .Hence E
Re: In the sixteenth century, the push for greater precision in   [#permalink] 24 Jul 2014, 14:26
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