Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 22 Aug 2014, 06:08

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Jul 2009
Posts: 14
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2009, 00:07
In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent of the Black population of the United States left the South, where the preponderance of the Black population had been located, and migrated to northern states, with the largest number moving, it is claimed, between 1916 and 1918. It has been frequently assumed, but not proved, that the majority of the migrants in what has come to be called the Great Migration came from rural areas and were motivated by two concurrent factors: the collapse of the cotton industry following the boll weevil infestation, which began in 1898, and increased demand in the North for labor following the cessation of European immigration caused by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. This assumption has led to the conclusion that the migrants’ subsequent lack of economic mobility in the North is tied to rural background, a background that implies unfamiliarity with urban living and a lack of industrial skills.
But the question of who actually left the South has never been rigorously investigated. Although numerous investigations document an exodus from rural southern areas to southern cities prior to the Great Migration, no one has considered whether the same migrants then moved on to northern cities. In 1910 over 600,000 Black workers, or ten percent of the Black work force, reported themselves to be engaged in "manufacturing and mechanical pursuits," the federal census category roughly encompassing the entire industrial sector. The Great Migration could easily have been made up entirely of this group and their families. It is perhaps surprising to argue that an employed population could be enticed to move, but an explanation lies in the labor conditions then prevalent in the South.
About thirty-five percent of the urban Black population in the South was engaged in skilled trades. Some were from the old artisan class of slavery-blacksmiths, masons, carpenters-which had had a monopoly of certain trades, but they were gradually being pushed out by competition, mechanization, and obsolescence. The remaining sixty-five percent, more recently urbanized, worked in newly developed industries-tobacco, lumber, coal and iron manufacture, and railroads. Wages in the South, however, were low, and Black workers were aware, through labor recruiters and the Black press, that they could earn more even as unskilled workers in the North than they could as artisans in the South. After the boll weevil infestation, urban Black workers faced competition from the continuing influx of both Black and White rural workers, who were driven to undercut the wages formerly paid for industrial jobs. Thus, a move north would be seen as advantageous to a group that was already urbanized and steadily employed, and the easy conclusion tying their subsequent economic problems in the North to their rural background comes into question.



6. The primary purpose of the passage is to

a. support an alternative to an accepted methodology
b. present evidence that resolves a contradiction
c. introduce a recently discovered source of information
d. challenge a widely accepted explanation
e. argue that a discarded theory deserves new attention


What is the answer for this qns.

Can it be not C ? because there the author found that, ppl migrate to north coz of the low wages in the south.

OA answer is D. i dont know why.
Kaplan Promo CodeKnewton GMAT Discount CodesManhattan GMAT Discount Codes
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 16 Apr 2009
Posts: 161
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 9 [1] , given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: What is the answer for this ? [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2009, 01:17
1
This post received
KUDOS
adiraju wrote:
In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent of the Black population of the United States left the South, where the preponderance of the Black population had been located, and migrated to northern states, with the largest number moving, it is claimed, between 1916 and 1918. It has been frequently assumed, but not proved, that the majority of the migrants in what has come to be called the Great Migration came from rural areas and were motivated by two concurrent factors: the collapse of the cotton industry following the boll weevil infestation, which began in 1898, and increased demand in the North for labor following the cessation of European immigration caused by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. This assumption has led to the conclusion that the migrants’ subsequent lack of economic mobility in the North is tied to rural background, a background that implies unfamiliarity with urban living and a lack of industrial skills.
But the question of who actually left the South has never been rigorously investigated. Although numerous investigations document an exodus from rural southern areas to southern cities prior to the Great Migration, no one has considered whether the same migrants then moved on to northern cities. In 1910 over 600,000 Black workers, or ten percent of the Black work force, reported themselves to be engaged in "manufacturing and mechanical pursuits," the federal census category roughly encompassing the entire industrial sector. The Great Migration could easily have been made up entirely of this group and their families. It is perhaps surprising to argue that an employed population could be enticed to move, but an explanation lies in the labor conditions then prevalent in the South.
About thirty-five percent of the urban Black population in the South was engaged in skilled trades. Some were from the old artisan class of slavery-blacksmiths, masons, carpenters-which had had a monopoly of certain trades, but they were gradually being pushed out by competition, mechanization, and obsolescence. The remaining sixty-five percent, more recently urbanized, worked in newly developed industries-tobacco, lumber, coal and iron manufacture, and railroads. Wages in the South, however, were low, and Black workers were aware, through labor recruiters and the Black press, that they could earn more even as unskilled workers in the North than they could as artisans in the South. After the boll weevil infestation, urban Black workers faced competition from the continuing influx of both Black and White rural workers, who were driven to undercut the wages formerly paid for industrial jobs. Thus, a move north would be seen as advantageous to a group that was already urbanized and steadily employed, and the easy conclusion tying their subsequent economic problems in the North to their rural background comes into question.



6. The primary purpose of the passage is to

a. support an alternative to an accepted methodology
b. present evidence that resolves a contradiction
c. introduce a recently discovered source of information
d. challenge a widely accepted explanation
e. argue that a discarded theory deserves new attention


What is the answer for this qns.

Can it be not C ? because there the author found that, ppl migrate to north coz of the low wages in the south.

OA answer is D. i dont know why.



If you look at the bolded portions in the above paragraph,you will realise that D is the ans.
For main idea or primary purpose types of questions you have to look at the larger picture and not at the smaller details
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jul 2013
Posts: 26
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 0

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2013, 08:41
Here , I was confused to see the word " widely accepted " . it may be a general view but is it widely accepted explanation ? that explanation is frequently assumed ( it is mentioned in the passage ) . so can we infer from that it is widely accepted view ?

Posted from my mobile device Image
Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent   [#permalink] 09 Nov 2013, 08:41
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average nitinneha 6 27 Mar 2007, 15:09
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average kripalkavi 8 06 Oct 2006, 21:08
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average remgeo 9 24 Mar 2006, 06:38
In 1981, for the first time in over two decades, the average ywilfred 11 07 Sep 2005, 06:04
in the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent karun_aggarwal 2 15 Apr 2005, 22:13
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.