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In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is

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In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 06:30
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In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is spent on health care, while in Britain the amount is about half that. A recent study indicated that middle-aged white Americans have a significantly higher rate of diabetes and heart disease than do middle-aged white Britons. Even after eliminating from the study the lifestyle differences of diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking, the data showed that the Americans have poorer health than their British counterparts.


The statements above, if true, best support which of the following assertions?

a) Health care spending in the United States should be reduced by 50%.
b) More expensive health care causes a higher incidence of certain diseases.
c) The money spent on health care in the United States is not being used effectively.
d) The average health care spending for middle-aged white Americans is probably less than the average health care spending for Americans in general.
e) Something other than diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking must account for the difference in health for the two groups in the study.
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 08:56
After POE of irrelevant answers or such that are "far" from the data given I was left with C & E.
I eventually chose C. I disqualified E because it states something that cannot be inferred from the data, it might be something other than diet,exercise,smoking and drinking but it might not be.
C makes a connection between the first and the second parts of the question's stem.
What's the OA?
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 09:01
why is e wrong? is it because it is stated in the argument? what if americans are generally unhealthy because of genetics etc... not an external factor, so that is accounted for in E
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 09:03
Orange08 wrote:
In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is spent on health care, while in Britain the amount is about half that. A recent study indicated that middle-aged white Americans have a significantly higher rate of diabetes and heart disease than do middle-aged white Britons. Even after eliminating from the study the lifestyle differences of diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking, the data showed that the Americans have poorer health than their British counterparts.

The statements above, if true, best support which of the following assertions?

a) Health care spending in the United States should be reduced by 50%.
Nothing in the stimulus suggests this.
b) More expensive health care causes a higher incidence of certain diseases.
Nothing in the stimulus suggests this.
c) The money spent on health care in the United States is not being used effectively.
Nothing in the stimulus suggests this.
d) The average health care spending for middle-aged white Americans is probably less than the average health care spending for Americans in general.
Nothing in the stimulus suggests this, there is a comparison of middle aged Americans vs Britons though.
e) Something other than diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking must account for the difference in health for the two groups in the study.
Pretty much what the last sentence says, Correct!

Also what is the source of this question?
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 09:03
I went for C too.
Whats the OA?
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 09:21
OA is E
Its from MGMAT
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 10:46
i agree it is E. since this is controlled then other factors apply
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2010, 20:39
Hurray, I pick E.

I was quite confused by D, because there was a distinction between WHITE american, WHITE briton and then THE american and The briton.

After long thought, the spending was not metioned, so E remains.
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2010, 20:17
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For this type of inference/draw a conclusion question (and when you see the phrase "best supports which of the following" it generally means you are dealing with that kind of question)-- you always want to stay *as close to the specific wording of the argument as possible.* One of GMAC's favorite tricks is coming up with conclusions that most reasonable people would draw but are not necessarily true given the exact wording of the argument. It's often the teeny tiny words, which casual/speedy readers gloss over, that are the key to knowing in black/white terms whether an answer choice is wrong.

These answers are riddled with classic distortions of the seemingly reasonable type. Choices A and B contain common "red flag" words-- whenever you see these words, perk up and pay extra attention.

(A) "should be"-- if you are inferring that something SHOULD BE done--a recommendation-- make sure that the argument itself has that thrust. Here the entire argument is a list of facts and there is no recommendation made.

(B) "causes" -- causality is always something to be suspicious of, and even more so when there is only correlational evidence. Remember what your high school science teacher said: "Correlation does not imply causation." Here there is only correlational information.

Choice (C) is something that a reasonable person might think in the non-GMAT world. In the US right now, this is a huge argument being made-- "Look at the rest of the world! Why are we spending more but seeing an increasingly less healthy population?" BUT the very specific wording of this conclusion sets the argument scope around the EFFECTIVENESS of spending...there is nothing mentioned in the argument about effectiveness. Also, I've found in the past that it's often useful to be suspicious of answers that are in the popular consciousness in a large way-- people are attracted to the familiar, and the test writers know this.

Choice (D) uses another familiar trick-- take words from the argument and jumble them around a little. The comparison in the statement is between middle-aged white Americans and middle-aged white Britons-- the comparison in (D) is between two different types of Americans.

Choice (E), as Dawgie states above, says almost exactly the same thing as the last sentence in the stimulus. It might even seem too suspiciously obvious for some test-takers. But the correct answer for this type of question is the one that requires the smallest possible jump in logic, and (E) does this.


The more you do these, the more quickly you'll be able to spot these tiny words and the traps laid out for you. I'm guessing that many of the posters above, after reading the argument, were able to POE through the answer choices in less than 30 seconds. If it takes you longer right now-- don't lose heart-- keep practicing identifying those little words and your speed will pick up as your pattern recognition skills refine.
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Re: health care [#permalink] New post 30 Sep 2013, 04:42
parker wrote:
For this type of inference/draw a conclusion question (and when you see the phrase "best supports which of the following" it generally means you are dealing with that kind of question)-- you always want to stay *as close to the specific wording of the argument as possible.* One of GMAC's favorite tricks is coming up with conclusions that most reasonable people would draw but are not necessarily true given the exact wording of the argument. It's often the teeny tiny words, which casual/speedy readers gloss over, that are the key to knowing in black/white terms whether an answer choice is wrong.

These answers are riddled with classic distortions of the seemingly reasonable type. Choices A and B contain common "red flag" words-- whenever you see these words, perk up and pay extra attention.

(A) "should be"-- if you are inferring that something SHOULD BE done--a recommendation-- make sure that the argument itself has that thrust. Here the entire argument is a list of facts and there is no recommendation made.

(B) "causes" -- causality is always something to be suspicious of, and even more so when there is only correlational evidence. Remember what your high school science teacher said: "Correlation does not imply causation." Here there is only correlational information.

Choice (C) is something that a reasonable person might think in the non-GMAT world. In the US right now, this is a huge argument being made-- "Look at the rest of the world! Why are we spending more but seeing an increasingly less healthy population?" BUT the very specific wording of this conclusion sets the argument scope around the EFFECTIVENESS of spending...there is nothing mentioned in the argument about effectiveness. Also, I've found in the past that it's often useful to be suspicious of answers that are in the popular consciousness in a large way-- people are attracted to the familiar, and the test writers know this.

Choice (D) uses another familiar trick-- take words from the argument and jumble them around a little. The comparison in the statement is between middle-aged white Americans and middle-aged white Britons-- the comparison in (D) is between two different types of Americans.

Choice (E), as Dawgie states above, says almost exactly the same thing as the last sentence in the stimulus. It might even seem too suspiciously obvious for some test-takers. But the correct answer for this type of question is the one that requires the smallest possible jump in logic, and (E) does this.


The more you do these, the more quickly you'll be able to spot these tiny words and the traps laid out for you. I'm guessing that many of the posters above, after reading the argument, were able to POE through the answer choices in less than 30 seconds. If it takes you longer right now-- don't lose heart-- keep practicing identifying those little words and your speed will pick up as your pattern recognition skills refine.



Excellent explanation tie was between C and E. Fantastic explanation deserves KUDOS.
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Re: In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2014, 22:10
Orange08 wrote:
In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is spent on health care, while in Britain the amount is about half that. A recent study indicated that middle-aged white Americans have a significantly higher rate of diabetes and heart disease than do middle-aged white Britons. Even after eliminating from the study the lifestyle differences of diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking, the data showed that the Americans have poorer health than their British counterparts.


The statements above, if true, best support which of the following assertions?

a) Health care spending in the United States should be reduced by 50%.
b) More expensive health care causes a higher incidence of certain diseases.
c) The money spent on health care in the United States is not being used effectively.
d) The average health care spending for middle-aged white Americans is probably less than the average health care spending for Americans in general.
e) Something other than diet, exercise, smoking, and drinking must account for the difference in health for the two groups in the study.


E for sure, after eliminating lifestyle differences, the result still showed that the Americans have poorer health --> there must be other causes for that result.
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Re: In the United States, about $5,200 per person per year is   [#permalink] 31 Jul 2014, 22:10
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