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Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection

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Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2009, 11:33
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Guys I didn't forget your request, just was collecting good questions to post.

So here are some inequality and absolute value questions from my collection. Not every problem below is hard, but there are a few, which are quite tricky. Please provide your explanations along with the answers.

1. If \(6*x*y = x^2*y + 9*y\), what is the value of xy?
(1) \(y – x = 3\)
(2) \(x^3< 0\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-20.html#p653690

2. If y is an integer and \(y = |x| + x\), is \(y = 0\)?
(1) \(x < 0\)
(2) \(y < 1\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-20.html#p653695

3. Is \(x^2 + y^2 > 4a\)?
(1) \((x + y)^2 = 9a\)
(2) \((x – y)^2 = a\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653697

4. Are x and y both positive?
(1) \(2x-2y=1\)
(2) \(\frac{x}{y}>1\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653709

5. What is the value of y?
(1) \(3|x^2 -4| = y - 2\)
(2) \(|3 - y| = 11\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653731

6. If x and y are integer, is y > 0?
(1) \(x +1 > 0\)
(2) \(xy > 0\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653740

7. \(|x+2|=|y+2|\) what is the value of x+y?
(1) \(xy<0\)
(2) \(x>2\), \(y<2\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653783 AND inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-160.html#p1111747

8. \(a*b \neq 0\). Is \(\frac{|a|}{|b|}=\frac{a}{b}\)?
(1) \(|a*b|=a*b\)
(2) \(\frac{|a|}{|b|}=|\frac{a}{b}|\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653789

9. Is n<0?
(1) \(-n=|-n|\)
(2) \(n^2=16\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653792

10. If n is not equal to 0, is |n| < 4 ?
(1) \(n^2 > 16\)
(2) \(\frac{1}{|n|} > n\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653796

11. Is \(|x+y|>|x-y|\)?
(1) \(|x| > |y|\)
(2) \(|x-y| < |x|\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653853

12. Is r=s?
(1) \(-s \leq r \leq s\)
(2) \(|r| \geq s\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653870

13. Is \(|x-1| < 1\)?
(1) \((x-1)^2 \leq 1\)
(2) \(x^2 - 1 > 0\)

Solution: inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-40.html#p653886

Official answers (OA's) and detailed solutions are in my posts on pages 2 and 3.
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New post 04 Oct 2012, 04:13
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Correct me if I'm wrong because the concepts are always the same but the gmat blonds them and as consequence blow your mind.

in other words, you are saying

1/|n| > n 2 cases

1/-n > n ----> n^2 > -1 this implies that any squared number is positive and therefore greater than -1, all negative n values work as solutions. your n < 0

1/n > n -----> 1 > n^2 ----> n^ 2 < 1 --------> -1 < n < 1 . your second range. so in the end we have all those information and we are not sure of course of - 4 < n < 4.

Correct ???

Thanks
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New post 04 Oct 2012, 04:36
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2012, 03:11
Bunuel wrote:
11. Is |x+y|>|x-y|?
(1) |x| > |y|
(2) |x-y| < |x|

To answer this question you should visualize it. We have comparison of two absolute values. Ask yourself when |x+y| is more then than |x-y|? If and only when x and y have the same sign absolute value of x+y will always be more than absolute value of x-y. As x+y when they have the same sign will contribute to each other and x-y will not.

5+3=8 and 5-3=2
OR -5-3=-8 and -5-(-3)=-2.

So if we could somehow conclude that x and y have the same sign or not we would be able to answer the question.

(1) |x| > |y|, this tell us nothing about the signs of x and y. Not sufficient.

(2) |x-y| < |x|, says that the distance between x and y is less than distance between x and origin. This can only happen when x and y have the same sign, when they are both positive or both negative, when they are at the same side from the origin. Sufficient. (Note that vise-versa is not right, meaning that x and y can have the same sign but |x| can be less than |x-y|, but if |x|>|x-y| the only possibility is x and y to have the same sign.)

Answer: B.


Hi Bunuel - Can this solved in the below way?

Is |x+y|>|x-y|?

Since both sides are +ve we can square both side of the inequality....
On squaring we get xy>0?

statement 1

(1) |x| > |y|

This is NS as xy can be opp sign as well as same sign

(2) |x-y| < |x|

Squaring on both sides we get y^2 < 2xy
Y cannot be zero otherwise the inequality cannot hold so Y^2 is +ve hence xy is +ve
So we can answer the question xy>0

Is this fine Bunuel?
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New post 11 Oct 2012, 03:22
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Jp27 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
11. Is |x+y|>|x-y|?
(1) |x| > |y|
(2) |x-y| < |x|

To answer this question you should visualize it. We have comparison of two absolute values. Ask yourself when |x+y| is more then than |x-y|? If and only when x and y have the same sign absolute value of x+y will always be more than absolute value of x-y. As x+y when they have the same sign will contribute to each other and x-y will not.

5+3=8 and 5-3=2
OR -5-3=-8 and -5-(-3)=-2.

So if we could somehow conclude that x and y have the same sign or not we would be able to answer the question.

(1) |x| > |y|, this tell us nothing about the signs of x and y. Not sufficient.

(2) |x-y| < |x|, says that the distance between x and y is less than distance between x and origin. This can only happen when x and y have the same sign, when they are both positive or both negative, when they are at the same side from the origin. Sufficient. (Note that vise-versa is not right, meaning that x and y can have the same sign but |x| can be less than |x-y|, but if |x|>|x-y| the only possibility is x and y to have the same sign.)

Answer: B.


Hi Bunuel - Can this solved in the below way?

Is |x+y|>|x-y|?

Since both sides are +ve we can square both side of the inequality....
On squaring we get xy>0?

statement 1

(1) |x| > |y|

This is NS as xy can be opp sign as well as same sign

(2) |x-y| < |x|

Squaring on both sides we get y^2 < 2xy
Y cannot be zero otherwise the inequality cannot hold so Y^2 is +ve hence xy is +ve
So we can answer the question xy>0

Is this fine Bunuel?


Yes, this approach is correct.
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2012, 04:40
Bunuel wrote:
2. If y is an integer and y = |x| + x, is y = 0?
(1) x < 0
(2) y < 1

Note: as \(y=|x|+x\) then \(y\) is never negative. For \(x>{0}\) then \(y=x+x=2x\) and for \(x\leq{0}\) then (when x is negative or zero) then \(y=-x+x=0\).

(1) \(x<0\) --> \(y=|x|+x=-x+x=0\). Sufficient.

(2) \(y<1\), as we concluded y is never negative, and we are given that \(y\) is an integer, hence \(y=0\). Sufficient.

Answer: D.



Hi Bunuel,

Thanks for the explanation to the above Q.

Regarding st 1 i.e X less than zero then [m]y=|x|+x = -x+x=0,

1. we know any value in modulus is positive then ideally the above should be interpreted as [m]y=|x|+x--> [m]y=x-x=0.
2.Also if from St 1 if we x<0 then [m]y=|x|+x= -x-x=-2x

3. Where as we also know that |x|= -x for X<0 and |x|= x for X>/ 0

So can you please tell me where am I going wrong with the concept.

Thanks
Mridul
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New post 23 Dec 2012, 05:29
Bunuel wrote:
9. Is n<0?
(1) -n=|-n|
(2) n^2=16

(1) -n=|-n|, means that either n is negative OR n equals to zero. We are asked whether n is negative so we can not be sure. Not sufficient.

(2) n^2=16 --> n=4 or n=-4. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) n is negative OR n equals to zero from (1), n is 4 or -4 from (2). --> n=-4, hence it's negative, sufficient.

Answer: C.



Hello Bunuel,

I got A as the answer to the Q.

From St1, we have -n=|-n|---> -n=n (As Mod value is +ve)---> we have 2n=0 or -2n=0. In both case we can say that n=0 and hence Ans should be A.

From your explanation, it is very clear that either n<0 or n=0. Could you tell me what was your approach to this Question. I mean did you assume values of
1. n as less than zero,
2. ngreater than zero and
3. n equal to zero

and check under which condition the St1 holds true.

If so, would this be a standard way of doing a modulus Question because clearly I just considered only 1 of the above conditions here.

Your inputs please

Thanks
Mridul
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2012, 05:37
Expert's post
mridulparashar1 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
2. If y is an integer and y = |x| + x, is y = 0?
(1) x < 0
(2) y < 1

Note: as \(y=|x|+x\) then \(y\) is never negative. For \(x>{0}\) then \(y=x+x=2x\) and for \(x\leq{0}\) then (when x is negative or zero) then \(y=-x+x=0\).

(1) \(x<0\) --> \(y=|x|+x=-x+x=0\). Sufficient.

(2) \(y<1\), as we concluded y is never negative, and we are given that \(y\) is an integer, hence \(y=0\). Sufficient.

Answer: D.



Hi Bunuel,

Thanks for the explanation to the above Q.

Regarding st 1 i.e X less than zero then y=|x|+x = -x+x=0,

1. we know any value in modulus is positive then ideally the above should be interpreted as y=|x|+x--> y=x-x=0.
2.Also if from St 1 if we x<0 then y=|x|+x= -x-x=-2x

3. Where as we also know that |x|= -x for X<0 and |x|= x for X>/ 0


So can you please tell me where am I going wrong with the concept.

Thanks
Mridul


Absolute value properties:

When \(x\leq{0}\) then \(|x|=-x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\leq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={-(some \ expression)}\). For example: \(|-5|=5=-(-5)\);

When \(x\geq{0}\) then \(|x|=x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\geq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={some \ expression}\). For example: \(|5|=5\);

So, if \(x<0\), then \(|x|=-x\) and \(y=|x|+x=-x+x=0\).

For more check here: math-absolute-value-modulus-86462.html
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New post 23 Dec 2012, 05:40
Expert's post
mridulparashar1 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
9. Is n<0?
(1) -n=|-n|
(2) n^2=16

(1) -n=|-n|, means that either n is negative OR n equals to zero. We are asked whether n is negative so we can not be sure. Not sufficient.

(2) n^2=16 --> n=4 or n=-4. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) n is negative OR n equals to zero from (1), n is 4 or -4 from (2). --> n=-4, hence it's negative, sufficient.

Answer: C.



Hello Bunuel,

I got A as the answer to the Q.

From St1, we have -n=|-n|---> -n=n (As Mod value is +ve)---> we have 2n=0 or -2n=0. In both case we can say that n=0 and hence Ans should be A.



First of all: \(|-n|=|n|\), so \(-n=|-n|\) is the same as \(-n=|n|\), which means that \(n\leq{0}\).
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New post 24 Dec 2012, 14:16
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Great collection Bunuel...Kudos.. :)
Are these Qs. included in your signature or they exist as separate entity?

merry Xmas...Happy Holidays.
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New post 25 Dec 2012, 05:12
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New post 25 Dec 2012, 05:19
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Bunuel wrote:
debayan222 wrote:
Great collection Bunuel...Kudos.. :)
Are these Qs. included in your signature or they exist as separate entity?

merry Xmas...Happy Holidays.


Yes, they are in Inequalities set.


Thanks a lot Bunuel..
Well I guess, whatever Qs come from you directly to the forum, are included in you Sig. ? Hope I got you right..:)
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2013, 11:57
Thanks Bunuel. These questions are of great value indeed!
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2013, 20:55
Bunuel wrote:
3. Is x^2 + y^2 > 4a?
(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a
(2) (x – y)^2 = a

(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a --> x^2+2xy+y^2=9a. Clearly insufficient.

(2) (x – y)^2 = a --> x^2-2xy+y^2=a. Clearly insufficient.

(1)+(2) Add them up 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a. Also insufficient as x,y, and a could be 0 and x^2 + y^2 > 4a won't be true, as LHS and RHS would be in that case equal to zero. Not sufficient.

Answer: E.


I got C. Can you please explain why this is incorrect?

Statement 1 gives x^2+2xy+y^2 = 9a, and I rewrote it to 9a-2xy = x^2+y^2
Statement 2 gives x^2-2xy+y^2=a, and i rewrote this to x^2+y^2= a +2xy

Together, I have 9a-2xy = a+2xy, which leads to 8a = 4xy, but 8a is also equal to x^2+y^2? ... this last part must be wrong?
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2013, 21:23
Bunuel wrote:
5. What is the value of y?
(1) 3|x^2 -4| = y - 2
(2) |3 - y| = 11

(1) As we are asked to find the value of y, from this statement we can conclude only that y>=2, as LHS is absolute value which is never negative, hence RHS als can not be negative. Not sufficient.

(2) |3 - y| = 11:

y<3 --> 3-y=11 --> y=-8
y>=3 --> -3+y=11 --> y=14

Two values for y. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) y>=2, hence y=14. Sufficient.

Answer: C.


Bunuel, I think I need some conceptual help. Why should we not solve statement 1 by rewriting the two statements and then adding them together? (Besides the fact that it's time consuming....) I rewrote them and found 3x^2 -10 = y for the positive absolute vlaue, and -3x^2+14=y for the negative abs value. From this, I added them together and got y=4..

Can you please explain what I'm getting wrong conceptually? Thanks so much!!!! I appreciate your kindness.
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 01:18
Expert's post
JJ2014 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. Is x^2 + y^2 > 4a?
(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a
(2) (x – y)^2 = a

(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a --> x^2+2xy+y^2=9a. Clearly insufficient.

(2) (x – y)^2 = a --> x^2-2xy+y^2=a. Clearly insufficient.

(1)+(2) Add them up 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a. Also insufficient as x,y, and a could be 0 and x^2 + y^2 > 4a won't be true, as LHS and RHS would be in that case equal to zero. Not sufficient.

Answer: E.


I got C. Can you please explain why this is incorrect?

Statement 1 gives x^2+2xy+y^2 = 9a, and I rewrote it to 9a-2xy = x^2+y^2
Statement 2 gives x^2-2xy+y^2=a, and i rewrote this to x^2+y^2= a +2xy

Together, I have 9a-2xy = a+2xy, which leads to 8a = 4xy, but 8a is also equal to x^2+y^2? ... this last part must be wrong?


The red part is not right. If you sum the two equations you'll get 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a.

Below posts might help with this question:
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-80.html#p687991
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-100.html#p746278

Hope it helps.
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 07:14
Bunuel wrote:
JJ2014 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. Is x^2 + y^2 > 4a?
(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a
(2) (x – y)^2 = a

(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a --> x^2+2xy+y^2=9a. Clearly insufficient.

(2) (x – y)^2 = a --> x^2-2xy+y^2=a. Clearly insufficient.

(1)+(2) Add them up 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a. Also insufficient as x,y, and a could be 0 and x^2 + y^2 > 4a won't be true, as LHS and RHS would be in that case equal to zero. Not sufficient.

Answer: E.


I got C. Can you please explain why this is incorrect?

Statement 1 gives x^2+2xy+y^2 = 9a, and I rewrote it to 9a-2xy = x^2+y^2
Statement 2 gives x^2-2xy+y^2=a, and i rewrote this to x^2+y^2= a +2xy

Together, I have 9a-2xy = a+2xy, which leads to 8a = 4xy, but 8a is also equal to x^2+y^2? ... this last part must be wrong?


The red part is not right. If you sum the two equations you'll get 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a.

Below posts might help with this question:
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-80.html#p687991
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-100.html#p746278

Hope it helps.


So I understand that you summed the equations and got that answer. But why is setting them equal to each other wrong in this case? I'm trying to figure out what concept I'm missing so that I don't end up doing it again.
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 07:26
Bunuel wrote:
JJ2014 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
5. What is the value of y?
(1) 3|x^2 -4| = y - 2
(2) |3 - y| = 11

(1) As we are asked to find the value of y, from this statement we can conclude only that y>=2, as LHS is absolute value which is never negative, hence RHS als can not be negative. Not sufficient.

(2) |3 - y| = 11:

y<3 --> 3-y=11 --> y=-8
y>=3 --> -3+y=11 --> y=14

Two values for y. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) y>=2, hence y=14. Sufficient.

Answer: C.


Bunuel, I think I need some conceptual help. Why should we not solve statement 1 by rewriting the two statements and then adding them together? (Besides the fact that it's time consuming....) I rewrote them and found 3x^2 -10 = y for the positive absolute vlaue, and -3x^2+14=y for the negative abs value. From this, I added them together and got y=4..

Can you please explain what I'm getting wrong conceptually? Thanks so much!!!! I appreciate your kindness.


|x^2-4|=x^2-4 when x^2-4>0;
|x^2-4|=-(x^2-4) when x^2-4<=0.

So, the two equations you'll get from the original are relevant for different ranges of x. Hence, you cannot consider them as two separate equations and solve.

To put it simply: we cannot get the single value of y from 3|x^2 -4| = y - 2. Consider y=2 and x=2 OR y=11 and x=1.

Hope it's clear.


This is clear. Thank you!!
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 08:09
Expert's post
JJ2014 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
JJ2014 wrote:

I got C. Can you please explain why this is incorrect?

Statement 1 gives x^2+2xy+y^2 = 9a, and I rewrote it to 9a-2xy = x^2+y^2
Statement 2 gives x^2-2xy+y^2=a, and i rewrote this to x^2+y^2= a +2xy

Together, I have 9a-2xy = a+2xy, which leads to 8a = 4xy, but 8a is also equal to x^2+y^2? ... this last part must be wrong?


The red part is not right. If you sum the two equations you'll get 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a.

Below posts might help with this question:
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-80.html#p687991
inequality-and-absolute-value-questions-from-my-collection-86939-100.html#p746278

Hope it helps.


So I understand that you summed the equations and got that answer. But why is setting them equal to each other wrong in this case? I'm trying to figure out what concept I'm missing so that I don't end up doing it again.


What are you trying to get when setting "them" equal? Anyway, you won't be able to solve two equations with three unknowns.
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Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2013, 06:35
7. |x+2|=|y+2| what is the value of x+y?
(1) xy<0
(2) x>2 y<2

The solution seem confusing to me as I see four cases:
a] x<-2, y<-2
b]x>-2, y>-2
c] x<-2, y>-2
d]x>-2, y<-2

case [a] and [b] support x=y while case [c] and [d] support x+y=-4

when xy<0, the case [c]or[d] always do not apply, for example: x=-3 and y=3 would come under case[c] and x=-1 and y=3 would come under case [b] , so it is insufficient.

when x>2 , y<2, we have a case [b] with x=3, y=-1 and a case [d] with x=3,y=-3. So insufficient

when we combine(1)+(2) , we have a case as shown above , it is also insufficient.

So my answer choice would be E.

Can somebody help if I am wrong.
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Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2013, 04:18
Bunuel wrote:
3. Is x^2 + y^2 > 4a?
(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a
(2) (x – y)^2 = a

(1) (x + y)^2 = 9a --> x^2+2xy+y^2=9a. Clearly insufficient.

(2) (x – y)^2 = a --> x^2-2xy+y^2=a. Clearly insufficient.

(1)+(2) Add them up 2(x^2+y^2)=10a --> x^2+y^2=5a. Also insufficient as x,y, and a could be 0 and x^2 + y^2 > 4a won't be true, as LHS and RHS would be in that case equal to zero. Not sufficient.

Answer: E.


Hi Bunnel
Solved the 1st statement like this -
\((x + y)^2 = 9a\)
Since \(x^2 + y^2 >= 2xy\)
\(x^2 + y^2 + x^2 + y^2 >= 9a\)
\(2(x^2 + y^2) >= 9a\)
\(x^2 + y^2 >= 4.5a\)
Now this would have been sufficient if a is not = 0 had been given in the stem
Is this approach to the problem alright??
Is this st sufficient if it is given that a is not equal to 0
Thanks
Re: Inequality and absolute value questions from my collection   [#permalink] 17 Apr 2013, 04:18

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