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Is 0.n68<1/n? 1). n<5 2). 0.n68<1/n^2

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Is 0.n68<1/n? 1). n<5 2). 0.n68<1/n^2 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2006, 13:32
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E

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Is 0.n68<1/n?
1). n<5
2). 0.n68<1/n^2
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 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2006, 13:48
I go on (B)

(1) n<5
n=1 or 2 or 3 or 4

for n= 1 or 2, the inequality is verified
for n=3 or above, the inequality is not verified
Not Sufficient

(2) 0,n68 < 1/n^2
Only n=1 works with it.

As we know n, so we can conclude 0,n68 < 1/n
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 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2006, 14:27
I'll go with E.

if n=0 the expression goes to infinity which is indeterminate.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2006, 21:28
I will go with B...n wont be zero. Typically GMAT exam will make that assumption...
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 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2006, 22:27
yessuresh wrote:
I'll go with E.

if n=0 the expression goes to infinity which is indeterminate.


Hey dude, n cab bot be equal to 0, we can not divide any number by zero.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 01:45
The ques is asking Is .n68<1/n and not for what value of n.

It should be E.
Please correct me if i am wrong.
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 [#permalink] New post 31 May 2006, 18:10
amansingla4 wrote:
The ques is asking Is .n68<1/n and not for what value of n.

It should be E.
Please correct me if i am wrong.


I go with B. The statement only works with B and the question is asking if we have enough information to answer the question. Since with B we know that n=1 we plug that back into the question and find that 0.168 is indeed less than 1 and sufficient to answer the question. Hope this helps.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2006, 12:17
I go with E.
Putting 1 & 4 in eqn 1 gives two different answers.
similarly, putting 1 & 4 in eqn 2 gives 2 diff answeres.
so It can't be answers even combining them together.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Jun 2006, 20:25
I go with E as well.

Both 1 and 4 work as n.

If n= 1, then the answer is Yes
If n = 4, the answer is no

Two different answers - E
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2006, 06:29
yessuresh wrote:
I'll go with E.

if n=0 the expression goes to infinity which is indeterminate.


For this question we should infer that n is a number from 1 to 9. The fact that 1/n is included in the stem has precluded the possibility of n=0. For GMAT remember if something appears in the denominator, it is non zero. However, if you see something like n*0.n68<1, you cannot devide both sides by n while assuming n is non-zero.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2006, 07:30
The answer is B.

In fact, in the decimal represtentation of a number, n is a positive integer from 0 to 9.

If the second statement is true, n=1. For n=0 the expression is nonsense, because you cannot divide by 0.

Note that in evaluating the sufficiency of the first statement you have to consider the case n=0, because n<5 does not exclude this possibility. Whereas, in evaluating the sufficiency of the second statement, you haven't to consider n=0, because for n=0 the hypothesis you should assume to be true would not be verified.
  [#permalink] 05 Jun 2006, 07:30
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Is 0.n68<1/n? 1). n<5 2). 0.n68<1/n^2

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