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John Wyndham Lewis, the famous sociologist, postulated that

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John Wyndham Lewis, the famous sociologist, postulated that [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 12:41
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A
B
C
D
E

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John Wyndham Lewis, the famous sociologist, postulated that if murder is a worse crime than blackmail and blackmail is is a worse crime than theft, how much more so is murder a worse crime than theft.

Which is a correct analysis of the above argument?

A) A case operating in one situation will also be operative in another situation, if both situations are characterized in identical terms
B) A case that operates under certain conditions will surely be operative in other situations in which the same conditions are present in a more acute form
C) A case that clearly expresses the purpose it was meant to serve will also apply in other situations in which the identical purpose may be served
D) A case that begins with a generalization as to intended application, then continues until the specification of particular cases, and then concludes with a restatement of the generalizationm, ca be applied only to the particular cases specified.
E) None of the above.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 12:59
I am shooting in the dark. I will go with B
I feel B compares severity of crimes
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 13:42
I'll go with A.
I'll try to explain if I am correct.

This looks like a LSAT question...
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 13:57
I will go with A too.. coz it states one case(murder) which is operative in two diff cases(theft and blackmail)
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 15:11
I was shuttling between A and B. I will hate it if the answer is A. Now I feel B looks extreme.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 18:36
Official answer: B
The statement by Lewis in the extract simply states that if X is greater than Y and Y is greater than Z, then X is greater than Z, i.e. the condition of being greater is more acute. Choice B, which states this condition, is the appropriate answer. Choice A does not describe the argument in the extract; there is a similarity in the terms used, but the extract does not say that murder is as bad as blackmail and the latter is bad as theft, therefore murder is as bad as theft. Therefore A is inappropriate. Choice C is inapplicable, as the extract does not state a purpose that can be applied to other situations. Similarly, D is not appropriate as there is no generalization, followed by specific cases. Since there is one appropriate answer, E is not correct
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 18:42
:musband

Right now I am rolling over my carpet.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2004, 20:56
You stole the show anandnk, good job !
  [#permalink] 14 Jan 2004, 20:56
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John Wyndham Lewis, the famous sociologist, postulated that

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