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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early

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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2010, 05:33
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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?
(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.

reasoning pls
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Re: simple yet confusing [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2010, 05:57
vageesh wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?
(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.

reasoning pls

IMO B....

A - Incorrect as the stem states that Johnson's text is much better than others. Hence his text is not on equally distortion levels
B - Correct. Johnson's use of dash in his text, misguides the readers about Dickinson's intention. The last sentences supports this - It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation
C - Incorrect - No where in the stem it is stated that Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published. The only thing she didnt expect was to see the dash in the print.
D - Incorrect - We have no proof that his material is well meaningful but lacks sufficient thoroughness. The only thing the stem says is that the his text is more faithful! Moreover we aren't bother with the meaning of the work. We just want the work to be shown as written by Dickinson
E - Incorrect - Too strong to be correct. It states that they have failed adequately although there isn't any proof of the same.

Please share the OA...
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Re: simple yet confusing [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2010, 17:06
Eleminating A,B,C and considering D & E:
- D --> it counts for not entire main point of argument, but only part of it -> trap
- E --> It sumarizes the main point of argument -> correct
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Re: simple yet confusing [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2010, 19:50
There was another discussion of this question. Here is the link http://gmatclub.com/forum/cr-dickinson-s-poetry-46261.html. Hopefully this helps.

Thanks,

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Re: simple yet confusing [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2010, 17:22
B for me too.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2013, 09:16
vageesh wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?
(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.

reasoning pls


Hi all, In my opinion the answer is (A)
We are asked about the main point.
The main point here is that Johnson criticizes but his use of the dash falls under the same number of mistakes he is criticizing.
Let me know if you want to discuss further,

Hope it helps
...And please post the OA
Thanks
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2013, 21:36
Question asks, "What is the author's main point?"
Best method for finding answer: process of elimination.

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
- Incorrect: the paragraph makes no indication of whether Johnson is wrong or right in his criticism, only that he is "on firm ground". Plus, the paragraph mentions that Johnson's text is more faithful, so it isn't of "equally serious distortions". The sentence that supports this answer, "Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion" is just the counter-premise.

(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.
- Correct. Punctuation affects poetry (as stated in the paragraph). Therefore, because we don't know if Dickinson would've approved of a dash, using it is misleading, in the sense that the dash could change the poem into something that Dickinson may not have intended.

(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
- Incorrect: The author does not say that Dickinson never expected to be published -- only that she "surely never expected" to see the dash used in such a way in print.

(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
- Incorrect: Irrelevant. It is true that Johnson produces a more faithful text, but it is not clear whether or not his own distortion is a result of studying with insufficiently.

(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.
- Incorrect: we're not talking about handwritten manuscripts, only handwritten punctuation.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2015, 07:23
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early   [#permalink] 30 Aug 2015, 07:23
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