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Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented

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Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2006, 17:42
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2006, 17:50
E

A. No talk about entrepreneurs

B. Doesn't say so in the paragraph

C. Same argument as for B

D. No talk about how heads are formed ( and no pun intended)

E. Since all major decisions are made by a committee, no risky, cutting edge technologies can be developed. Implies that all cutting edge technologies involve some risk.
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2006, 20:35
CONCLUSION=no risky decisions are taken by committee
evidence= all decisions are taken by committee

what about choice b.
if only single individuals will make risky decisions. meaning that committe wont take risky decisions because it's decisons are combined.



faifai0714 wrote:
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2006, 20:41
C ?
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2006, 21:41
I am up for (B) too.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 02:46
Narrowed it down to B and c.
b seems to be a little too strong. So I'll go with c.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 04:08
Narrowed down to B and C.

I will go for C.
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 04:53
faifai0714 wrote:
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.


uhm, tentative between B and C as well...
I'd pick B though since C (noted "more likely") is kinda open to a possibility that the committee still carry out some risky decision, thus there's still chance for risky technologies to develop ....In order to support "cannot" in the conclusion, B is more forceful.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 04:53
I pick B.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 05:12
For me it was a choice between B and E.

"All" in E makes it an extreme statement and hence ruled out.

Hence B.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 05:36
B 2

OA please
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 09:00
The OA is B.

The reason ( according to my bk) is the conclusion mentions that because "risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed. ", hence "only individuals make risky decisions. The key answer are the words cannot and only.

I'm not convinced by the OA(B) because only indivduals make risky decisions in terms of what? C explains more concisely by comparing an individual's gambling decision vs a group's decision.
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 09:13
faifai0714 wrote:
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.

C sounds more convincing than B. :o
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 09:40
Juaz wrote:
faifai0714 wrote:
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.

C sounds more convincing than B. :o


Well I'm glad I'm not the only one that is unconvinced. Maybe I was overthinking the answer on this one. However an OA is an OA.We have to respect the answer ultimately so that we won't make the same mistakes next time. :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 18:59
C is better. B is a bit extreme with only.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 19:13
B sounds like calculated risk..

C sounds like being reckless..

No?
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 19:24
B is the best.

Generally speaking agree that it is safe to stay away from too extreme options in GMAT. But in this specific case, the argument itself explicitly takes the extreme position "risky, cutting -ege tech CANNOT be developed". So I think B fits better compared to C which uses "more likely".
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Re: CR-Kirkland's theory of corporate structure [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 19:29
laxieqv wrote:
faifai0714 wrote:
Kirkland's theory of corporate structure can be represented by a truncated pyramid. There are workers, middle management, and executive management, but no head of the corporation. Instead, all major decisions are made by comittee. As a consequence, in Kirkland's structure, risky, cutting- edge technologies cannot be developed.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

a. Cutting-edge technologies are typically developed by entrepreneurs, not by big corporations.
b. Only single individuals will make risky decisions.
c. An individual is more likely to take a gamble on his own than in a group.
d. All heads of corporations reached their positions by taking risks.
e. All cutting edge technologies involve some risk.


uhm, tentative between B and C as well...
I'd pick B though since C (noted "more likely") is kinda open to a possibility that the committee still carry out some risky decision, thus there's still chance for risky technologies to develop ....In order to support "cannot" in the conclusion, B is more forceful.


Good point...
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2006, 20:34
hmm...finally i get it...thanks
  [#permalink] 11 Oct 2006, 20:34
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