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Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out

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Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 06 May 2010, 10:19
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

53% (02:01) correct 47% (01:57) wrong based on 22 sessions
How did you arrive at an answer?
--

As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color.

(A)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color

(B)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis with the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but if the sun ascended with this extremely unusual color

(C)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an extremely unusual color for the sun to ascend with

(D)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another to help form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, which has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an ascending sun with such a color would be considered extremely unusual

(E)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, its fluorescence, which is like the sun rising in the sky, would be considered extremely unusual if the sun rose with such color
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 06 May 2010, 11:02
JoshKnewton wrote:
How did you arrive at an answer?
--

As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color.

(A)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color

(B)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis with the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but if the sun ascended with this extremely unusual color

(C)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an extremely unusual color for the sun to ascend with

(D)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another to help form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, which has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an ascending sun with such a color would be considered extremely unusual

(E)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, its fluorescence, which is like the sun rising in the sky, would be considered extremely unusual if the sun rose with such color


Hope and a prayer.

But, really, breaking it down into parts. Extracting modifiers and make sure modifying phrases are close to what they modify. I won't go beyond that because I have seen this question before and I don't know remember what I did.
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 06 May 2010, 11:41
IMO A

C and D are wrong because the semicolon should be used for connecting two independent clauses.

B seems to be incomplete with the use of subordinate clause- BUT

E is wrong, because fluorescence is compared with the sun.
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 06 May 2010, 16:17
E - Which is a noun modifier and modifies fluorescence instead of Aurora Borealis

C the part after the ; is not a full clause

A - I think there is pronoun ambiguity isn't there with it? does it refer to the particle or Aurora Borealis

B - just sounds really awkward and horrible & the but just doesn't make sense

So I say D
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 07 May 2010, 06:36
Thanks Josh for throwing in such a good SC to crack.

IMO C.
A is close but in the end we need to have ||sm b/w rises and to ascend.

JoshKnewton wrote:
How did you arrive at an answer?
--

As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color.

(A)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color

(B)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis with the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky, but if the sun ascended with this extremely unusual color

(C)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, it has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an extremely unusual color for the sun to ascend with

(D)
A charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another to help form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, which has the same level of fluorescence that appears when the sun rises in the sky; an ascending sun with such a color would be considered extremely unusual

(E)
As a charged particle from the Earth's magnetosphere collides with another and helps form the greenish glow known as the Aurora Borealis, its fluorescence, which is like the sun rising in the sky, would be considered extremely unusual if the sun rose with such color

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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 07 May 2010, 09:30
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Hey guys- Joanna from Knewton here.

Choice D is the answer; the semicolon separates the first independent clause from the second one to express, logically, that the charged particles collide to help form the glow of the Aurora Borealis. The adjective clause beginning with "which" logically describes the Aurora Borealis as having a certain level of fluorescence, and the clause after the semicolon expresses that, though the fluorescence of the Aurora Borealis and the fluorescence of the rising sun are similar, a sun ascending with "such a color" (a greenish glow) would be considered unusual.

Great job run4run and seekmba for getting this difficult question correct. As most of you guys noticed, this question tests your ability to connect clauses both grammatically and logically. When you see that answer choices differ by the use of either a comma + conjunction or or a semicolon, you should know to look for clause connection (run-on/fragment) errors. When you see "which," you should be on the lookout for logical modification; the clause beginning with "which" must describe the noun before it. Most completely underlined sentences that you'll come across will test logical modification and clause connection, so lookout for clues (like "which" and FANBOYS) to get started if you're lost, and read the sentence for its meaning when you've eliminated fragments and such.

Choices A and B incorrectly use the comma + coordinating conjunction "but" to connect a clause that is not independent to the first clause, which is independent. Remember, a comma plus FANBOYS (For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So) conjunction can ONLY separate two clauses that are both able to stand on their own as sentences. As SOON as you see a comma + FANBOYS, make sure that the clauses on both sides are independent, unless the conjunction is being used to separate items on a list. In the original, the clause after the comma + "but" has neither a subject nor a verb. "Extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color" is not a sentence. In B, "if the sun ascended with this extremely unusual color" is a dependent, not an independent, clause.

The semicolon (;) must also separate two independent clauses. The semicolon is the only mark of punctuation that's really tested on SC. When a question's testing semicolon use, just make sure that the clauses joined by the semicolon are both independent. Choice C incorrectly uses the semicolon to connect the phrase "an extremely unusual color for the sun to ascend with" to the first independent clause. This phrase does not contain a verb. Gurpreetsingh, you were on the right track here by eliminating C for this reason. D, however, does contain an independent clause after the semicolon.

Choice E joins the ideas in a single clause, but does so illogically. None of you guys picked E; great job eliminating this one based on how illogical and jumbled it is. It's important to make sure that your answer makes sense. A combination how of run4run and gurpreetsingh eliminated E is correct here. The "which" clause illogically describes fluorescence as "like the sun rising in the sky." The fluorescence cannot be compared to the "sun rising in the sky." Fluorescence is a property of emitting radiation, and "the sun rising in the sky" is a noun described as doing something. The main clause here does not make sense; pair the subject and the verb eliminating the filler and you get: "its (which must refer to the subject of the previous clause, "a charged particle's) fluorescence...would be considered extremely unusual if the sun rose with such color." It does not make sense to say that a charged particle's fluorescence would be unusual only if the sun rose with a certain color. The two ideas are not logically connected.

Again, the correctly connected, logical sentence is D.

Joanna Bersin, Knewton Verbal
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 07 May 2010, 10:03
It's good to read all the choices.
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 07 May 2010, 14:53
excellent explanation.

It would be great if you guys post 1-2 weekly questions on SC. It will be great to learn from your expert explanations.
Thanks again.
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 07 May 2010, 21:13
Really good question... feel free to share some more

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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out [#permalink] New post 08 May 2010, 08:30
JoannaKnewton wrote:
Hey guys- Joanna from Knewton here.

Choice D is the answer; the semicolon separates the first independent clause from the second one to express, logically, that the charged particles collide to help form the glow of the Aurora Borealis. The adjective clause beginning with "which" logically describes the Aurora Borealis as having a certain level of fluorescence, and the clause after the semicolon expresses that, though the fluorescence of the Aurora Borealis and the fluorescence of the rising sun are similar, a sun ascending with "such a color" (a greenish glow) would be considered unusual.

Great job run4run and seekmba for getting this difficult question correct. As most of you guys noticed, this question tests your ability to connect clauses both grammatically and logically. When you see that answer choices differ by the use of either a comma + conjunction or or a semicolon, you should know to look for clause connection (run-on/fragment) errors. When you see "which," you should be on the lookout for logical modification; the clause beginning with "which" must describe the noun before it. Most completely underlined sentences that you'll come across will test logical modification and clause connection, so lookout for clues (like "which" and FANBOYS) to get started if you're lost, and read the sentence for its meaning when you've eliminated fragments and such.

Choices A and B incorrectly use the comma + coordinating conjunction "but" to connect a clause that is not independent to the first clause, which is independent. Remember, a comma plus FANBOYS (For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So) conjunction can ONLY separate two clauses that are both able to stand on their own as sentences. As SOON as you see a comma + FANBOYS, make sure that the clauses on both sides are independent, unless the conjunction is being used to separate items on a list. In the original, the clause after the comma + "but" has neither a subject nor a verb. "Extremely unusual if the sun ascended with such a color" is not a sentence. In B, "if the sun ascended with this extremely unusual color" is a dependent, not an independent, clause.

The semicolon (;) must also separate two independent clauses. The semicolon is the only mark of punctuation that's really tested on SC. When a question's testing semicolon use, just make sure that the clauses joined by the semicolon are both independent. Choice C incorrectly uses the semicolon to connect the phrase "an extremely unusual color for the sun to ascend with" to the first independent clause. This phrase does not contain a verb. Gurpreetsingh, you were on the right track here by eliminating C for this reason. D, however, does contain an independent clause after the semicolon.

Choice E joins the ideas in a single clause, but does so illogically. None of you guys picked E; great job eliminating this one based on how illogical and jumbled it is. It's important to make sure that your answer makes sense. A combination how of run4run and gurpreetsingh eliminated E is correct here. The "which" clause illogically describes fluorescence as "like the sun rising in the sky." The fluorescence cannot be compared to the "sun rising in the sky." Fluorescence is a property of emitting radiation, and "the sun rising in the sky" is a noun described as doing something. The main clause here does not make sense; pair the subject and the verb eliminating the filler and you get: "its (which must refer to the subject of the previous clause, "a charged particle's) fluorescence...would be considered extremely unusual if the sun rose with such color." It does not make sense to say that a charged particle's fluorescence would be unusual only if the sun rose with a certain color. The two ideas are not logically connected.

Again, the correctly connected, logical sentence is D.

Joanna Bersin, Knewton Verbal


The semicolon is the only mark of punctuation that's really tested on SC.

Errr.....that is not true. I was told that 'colons' and 'dashes' were tested pretty seriously in a recent GMAT encounter. (like a week back)
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Re: Knewton SC Challenge -- Check it out   [#permalink] 08 May 2010, 08:30
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