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Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close

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Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2013, 14:23
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Question Stats:

55% (02:27) correct 45% (01:57) wrong based on 201 sessions
Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close to Earth may be captured by Earth’s gravitational field, ultimately spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected at high speeds along a new trajectory.
(A) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected
(B) having spiraled inward and, fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere to be a “falling star”, or is redirected
(C) having spiraled inward and being fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or was redirected
(D) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere to act like a “falling star”, or be redirected
(E) spiraling inward and being fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or be redirected


For a discussion of auxiliary verb (a.k.a. helping verbs) and how they reflect verb number (i.e. singular vs. plural), as well as a full discussion of this SC question, see this post.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/auxiliary- ... -the-gmat/

Mike :-)
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2013, 21:59
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mikemcgarry wrote:
Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close to Earth may be captured by Earth’s gravitational field, ultimately spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected at high speeds along a new trajectory.
(A) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected
(B) having spiraled inward and, fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere to be a “falling star”, or is redirected
(C) having spiraled inward and being fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or was redirected
(D) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere to act like a “falling star”, or be redirected
(E) spiraling inward and being fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or be redirected


For a discussion of auxiliary verb (a.k.a. helping verbs) and how they reflect verb number (i.e. singular vs. plural), as well as a full discussion of this SC question, see this post.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/auxiliary- ... -the-gmat/

Mike :-)


Great question :) I chose E because:
The sentence can be boiled down to "... an asteroid... may be captured... ,or Y" --> Y needs to parallel " may be captured"
A, B, C --> not parallel
D --> parallel but the "and...or" (ignoring the words in between the 2 commas) doesn't make sense.
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2014, 00:27
mikemcgarry wrote:
Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close to Earth may be captured by Earth’s gravitational field, ultimately spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected at high speeds along a new trajectory.
(A) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected
(B) having spiraled inward and, fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere to be a “falling star”, or is redirected
(C) having spiraled inward and being fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or was redirected
(D) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere to act like a “falling star”, or be redirected
(E) spiraling inward and being fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or be redirected


For a discussion of auxiliary verb (a.k.a. helping verbs) and how they reflect verb number (i.e. singular vs. plural), as well as a full discussion of this SC question, see this post.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/auxiliary- ... -the-gmat/

Mike :-)


great, thank you Mike

comma+having done modifies the preceding clause and show an action happening before the action in the main clause.

so, "having spiral" must happen before "be captured" grammatically. This situation is not logic. B and C out

"and fully consumed" in A and D has no adjective in parallelism. Moreover, "consumed" should be paralel with "spiraling" logically. A and D out.
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2014, 08:24
First parameter would be to look for parallelism with may be OR ------

A,B and C are knocked out.

D has an error where it states "consumed" and it seems asteroid is performing the verb whereas it was being consumed, the asteroid was being acted upon by the atmosphere. So that nailed D.

Hence E.

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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2014, 08:39
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The sentence clearly tests parallelism. The sentence has the verb 'may be captured' and at the end of the sentence too (if you read the full sentence) you need a similar and parallel verb. Hence, the choice comes down to D and E.
Option D: 'Act like' is incorrect. 'Act' is a verb and verbs cannot be compared using 'like' but using 'as'.
Hence, E is the answer.
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2014, 06:43
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mikemcgarry wrote:
Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close to Earth may be captured by Earth’s gravitational field, ultimately spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected at high speeds along a new trajectory.
(A) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere while being a “falling star”, or is redirected
(B) having spiraled inward and, fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere to be a “falling star”, or is redirected
(C) having spiraled inward and being fully consumed when its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or was redirected
(D) spiraling inward and, fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere to act like a “falling star”, or be redirected
(E) spiraling inward and being fully consumed during its fiery descent through the atmosphere as a “falling star”, or be redirected


For a discussion of auxiliary verb (a.k.a. helping verbs) and how they reflect verb number (i.e. singular vs. plural), as well as a full discussion of this SC question, see this post.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/auxiliary- ... -the-gmat/

Mike :-)



Mike... It's surprising how similar you look to Bruce Banner from the Avenger's series.... Just an observation..! ;)

On a more serious note, isn't it true that while using "as" as a comparator, the part of the sentence following "as" needs to have an active verb. I'm confused between options D & E for this question.
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2014, 08:41
asethi100 wrote:
Mike... It's surprising how similar you look to Bruce Banner from the Avenger's series.... Just an observation..! ;)

On a more serious note, isn't it true that while using "as" as a comparator, the part of the sentence following "as" needs to have an active verb. I'm confused between options D & E for this question.


'as' is not used as an adverb here. It is used as a preposition instead.
'as' as a preposition refers to the function.
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2014, 10:08
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asethi100 wrote:
Mike... It's surprising how similar you look to Bruce Banner from the Avenger's series.... Just an observation..! ;)

On a more serious note, isn't it true that while using "as" as a comparator, the part of the sentence following "as" needs to have an active verb. I'm confused between options D & E for this question.

Dear asethi100,
Gee, if I could turn green and have physical strength much greater than normal, that could be helpful in certain situations. :-)

The word "as" is one of the trickier words of the English language. It has several uses uses
1) as a subordinate conjunction --- In this guise, it introduces a clause that must have a full [noun] + [verb] structure:
As the Sun was setting in the west, the Moon was rising in the east.
This is the form used in comparisons ---- again, because "as" introduces a clause, there must be a full verb following it.
Jane Goodall studied chimpanzees, as Dian Fossey studied gorillas.
2) as a preposition --- Prepositions are always followed by a noun or pronoun and are never followed by a verb. Many of the uses of "as" as a preposition involve idiomatic uses with verbs. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idioms-involving-as/
3) in assorted idiomatic constructions --- see
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/a-tricky-g ... vs-act-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idioms-of-comparison/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom ... positions/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom ... nsequence/

In this context, the word "as" in the OA, (E), serves as a preposition, and therefore only needs a noun as an object, not a verb.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2014, 04:27
Thank You so much Mike. That was really helpful. :)
Re: Knocked from the asteroid belt, an asteroid that comes close   [#permalink] 11 Jan 2014, 04:27
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