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Lady Murasaki

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Lady Murasaki [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2004, 16:55
Written in the early 11th century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world’s first novel.

B. Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
C. Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
D. Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
E. Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2004, 17:34
C it is
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2004, 18:45
D for me

Written in 11th century ..... Modifier modifies The Tale of Genji

It takes me a lot of time to just read the entire sentence... Any better alternatives to read such sentences ?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2004, 23:19
Hi Taklu,

Consider does not come with 'as'. All the options are having 'AS' except the Option 'C'.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2004, 23:31
E) is answer....

Phrase Written in the early 11th century by Lady Murasaki modifies the Shikibu

Also C) is incorrect since

consider The Tale of Genji the world’s first novel

does not make sense...
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Re: Lady Murasaki [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2004, 05:51
I will go for D.

This is a case of misplaced modifier. In A, it looks like the literary historians were written in early 11 th cetury. Same problen with B.

D & E are the only ones that address the problem. But the which is ambiguous in E.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2004, 07:24
Must be (C)
"consider A B", no need for "as" or "to be"
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2004, 07:36
OA is D.

I was falling for C at first because i think "consider" doesn't need "as" or "to be" Can anybody explain why D is correct? I understand that the first part modifies "The tale of Genji." But is "consider...to be" is the correct idiom?

BTW, this question is from Kaplan CD.

Thanx
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2004, 12:26
Damn, I got tricked too.

Look at (C), people will think "literary historians is written in the early 11th century by Lady Murasaki" instead of "The Tale of Genji". Good one!!
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SC [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2004, 12:47
The correct idiom is consider.

OA is c.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2004, 05:13
chanatty wrote:
OA is D.

I was falling for C at first because i think "consider" doesn't need "as" or "to be" Can anybody explain why D is correct? I understand that the first part modifies "The tale of Genji." But is "consider...to be" is the correct idiom?

BTW, this question is from Kaplan CD.

Thanx


Though the correct idiom is Consider, I think Consider to be is not wrong. Besides D is the only one that addreses the error in A.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2004, 07:09
Thanx guys. :)
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2004, 08:27
I think the BEST answer choice is D. When I see "Written......", I immediately look for the subject after the commas... and obviously the subject has to be "The tale of Genji". Only D satisfies this criteria.

As for whether "consider to be" is idiomatic? Well, I would say "NO"
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2006, 20:35
chanatty wrote:
OA is D. I was falling for C at first because i think "consider" doesn't need "as" or "to be" Can anybody explain why D is correct? I understand that the first part modifies "The tale of Genji." But is "consider...to be" is the correct idiom?

BTW, this question is from Kaplan CD. Thanx


you are correct. C is correct not D.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2006, 21:31
I stand by (D). The modifier is placed closest to Murasaki Shikibu.

B the way, the TOG was truly a Heian Era Masterpiece.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2006, 23:02
I go for 'D'.

Good one from the grave!
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2006, 23:04
Yep, professor must have dug deep into the archives to find this "bad boy."
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2006, 00:40
Thats an old post..
But D it has to be
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2006, 09:56
GMATT73 wrote:
Yep, professor must have dug deep into the archives to find this "bad boy."


old is gold. old posts give you your old days' memories.
  [#permalink] 22 Jan 2006, 09:56
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