Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 31 Jul 2014, 19:59

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2007
Posts: 183
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 18:24
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (02:41) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 649
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 36 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 18:56
(E)

Conclusion:
The reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

(E) is the exact opposite of the conclusion.
Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 2593
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 181 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 19:41
Skewed wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.


E provides an alternative explanation.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2007
Posts: 468
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 22:36
agree on E.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2007
Posts: 468
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 22:37
I'm a senior manager now 8-)
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Posts: 2501
Followers: 51

Kudos [?]: 484 [0], given: 19

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2007, 23:40
Skewed wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.




E is clear.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 1102
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 111 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2007, 05:09
E. because is the only one that consider an obstacle to women's willingness to run.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2007, 05:43
Skewed wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.


Conclusion: few women win elections not because they have difficulty but because few turn up. Otherwise, if more turn up more will win. The proporting will increase directly

(E) draws a comparison between men and women and reasons out why they do not run... they don't because of insufficient funds

Therefore why not 'A' :wink:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Dec 2006
Posts: 521
Location: Indonesia
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 90 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2007, 06:59
I will go for E

Amar
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Aug 2007
Posts: 206
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2007, 08:20
Skewed wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.


I originally picked E, but in the premise it states that "women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men."

So, the argument is based on those who are already running, not those who want to run. and, only for that reasoning, only B) makes sense to me (although, I will say, its a pretty crappy answer choice)
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Posts: 65
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2007, 08:28
Skewed wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.


It is E. The conclusion says that "few women want to run". E refutes it
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 145
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

Re: CR: Elections [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2007, 22:15
I picked E too.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jun 2007
Posts: 50
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2007, 13:26
My answer is B. What is the OA?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2007
Posts: 183
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2007, 23:43
miketal20 wrote:
My answer is B. What is the OA?


E.
  [#permalink] 07 Dec 2007, 23:43
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
3 Last year, medical schools in the United States received rohityes 10 11 Mar 2010, 02:19
4 Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and reply2spg 27 23 Feb 2009, 16:59
A representative of the Women's Bureau of the United States Yurik79 8 30 Aug 2006, 08:00
A representative of the Womens Bureau of the United States ywilfred 2 31 Aug 2005, 06:37
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic A representative of the Womens Bureau of the United States ashkg 6 11 Jul 2005, 19:50
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.