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Like Auden, the language of James Merrill is chatty, arch,

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Like Auden, the language of James Merrill is chatty, arch, [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 18:02
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A
B
C
D
E

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Like Auden, the language of James Merrill is chatty, arch, and conversational—given to complex syntactic flights as well as to prosaic free-verse strolls.

(A) Like Auden, the language of James Merrill
(B) Like Auden, James Merrill’s language
(C) Like Auden’s, James Merrill’s language
(D) As with Auden, James Merrill’s language
(E) As is Auden’s the language of James Merrill
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 18:16
C

rephrase the sentence to, "James Merrill's language is....like Auden's (language).
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 18:21
indasun wrote:
C

rephrase the sentence to, "James Merrill's language is....like Auden's (language).


I have read several people stating that rephrasing the sentence helps out... is there a type of structure? when is it a good rule of thumb to repharse the sentence?
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 19:17
acfuture wrote:
indasun wrote:
C

rephrase the sentence to, "James Merrill's language is....like Auden's (language).


I have read several people stating that rephrasing the sentence helps out... is there a type of structure? when is it a good rule of thumb to repharse the sentence?


Here presence of "like" indicates that this SC is testing comparison.
Now we need to find out what are we comparing?
Are we comparing nouns or are we comparing clauses?
To find out this we can rephrase the sentence if needed.

Here we are comparing "the language of James Merrill" with "the language of Auden".
Sentence can be rephrased as:

Like the language of Auden, the language of James Merrill is chatty, arch, and conversational—given to complex syntactic flights as well as to prosaic free-verse strolls.

This is what option C is conveying.

Since we are comparing nouns, we have to use "like".

Regards,
Brajesh

Last edited by b14kumar on 29 Jun 2006, 19:19, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 19:18
acfuture wrote:
indasun wrote:
C

rephrase the sentence to, "James Merrill's language is....like Auden's (language).


I have read several people stating that rephrasing the sentence helps out... is there a type of structure? when is it a good rule of thumb to repharse the sentence?


to rephrase here, means to add inferred part... since the Independent Clause starts with the subject "the language [of James Merrill]", we need to infer that first part compares the similar thing... language of Auden... which is achieved as a possessive in C

another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 03:54
u2lover wrote:
acfuture wrote:
indasun wrote:
C

rephrase the sentence to, "James Merrill's language is....like Auden's (language).


I have read several people stating that rephrasing the sentence helps out... is there a type of structure? when is it a good rule of thumb to repharse the sentence?


to rephrase here, means to add inferred part... since the Independent Clause starts with the subject "the language [of James Merrill]", we need to infer that first part compares the similar thing... language of Auden... which is achieved as a possessive in C

another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause


Thanks for the explanation on both post.. u2lover
I see it now...
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 04:05
u2lover wrote:
another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause


This is incorrect.
Consider the following examples:

As a soldier, he doesn't fear death.
Like a soldier, he doesn't fear death.

Both are correct, but have different meanings.
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 04:29
deowl wrote:
u2lover wrote:
another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause


This is incorrect.
Consider the following examples:

As a soldier, he doesn't fear death.
Like a soldier, he doesn't fear death.

Both are correct, but have different meanings.


Is E incorrect bcos it misses the comma after "As is Auden’s"

Otherwise I find it comparing languages.... apples for apples
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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 05:16
sumitsarkar82 wrote:
deowl wrote:
u2lover wrote:
another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause


This is incorrect.
Consider the following examples:

As a soldier, he doesn't fear death.
Like a soldier, he doesn't fear death.

Both are correct, but have different meanings.


Is E incorrect bcos it misses the comma after "As is Auden’s"

Otherwise I find it comparing languages.... apples for apples


Nope. Only like can be used to compare nouns.
As is used to compare clauses. In my first example above
as is not used to compare. Rather, it is a substitute for in the capacity of.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 05:50
C is clear winner as it's comparing Auden’s, James Merrill’s language.
_________________

Trying hard to achieve something unachievable now....

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Re: SC: Auden...James Merrill [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 07:53
deowl wrote:
u2lover wrote:
another point... "LIKE" is always followed by a noun or noun phrase, whereas "AS" is followed by a clause


This is incorrect.
Consider the following examples:

As a soldier, he doesn't fear death.
Like a soldier, he doesn't fear death.

Both are correct, but have different meanings.


I was talking about comparisons here and your 1st example isn't really a comparison... it doesn't compare "him" to something concrete (a physical somebody else... it compares him to stereotype), but has the meaning "Being a soldier..." so it isn't a direct comparison

is such case, on GMAT, usually they would put modifiers around, which in many cases, will destore the meaning and will be incorrect. they prefer "such as" or other idioms using "as"

good point though
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 17:25
OA is C
  [#permalink] 30 Jun 2006, 17:25
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