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Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy is never

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Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy is never [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 05:17
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Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy is never indulgent or florid, but rather finds elegance in sparseness.


(A) Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy

(B) Like the prose of Ernest Hemingway, Cormac McCarthy

(C) Like Ernest Hemingway's prose, Cormac McCarthy's

(D) As with Ernest Hemingway's prose, Cormac McCarthy's

(E) As that of Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy

Why D & E are wrong?
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 05:18
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D and E both use "as" instead of "like". Since we're comparing prose, we should use "like"; there is no action involved.
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 05:49
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Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy is never indulgent or florid, but rather finds elegance in sparseness.


(A) Like Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy

Incorrectly compares Hemingway to prose.

(B) Like the prose of Ernest Hemingway, Cormac McCarthy

Reverses (A), by comparing McCarthy to prose.

(C) Like Ernest Hemingway's prose, Cormac McCarthy's

Correctly compares the prose of one author to the other.

(D) As with Ernest Hemingway's prose, Cormac McCarthy's

Uses 'as', which should be reserved for comparing verbs not nouns.

(E) As that of Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy

Same as (D).
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 16:14
I would have picked "As" also. I understand that "like" is used for nouns and "As" is used for phrases, but what about the difference in meaning between these two sentences:

I play sports like Football, Basketball, and Golf
VS.
I play sports such as Football, Basketball, and Golf

One is describing a similarity (like) vs the other is giving specific examples (as). It's because of this reasoning why I chose E.
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2012, 05:00
Expert's post
ashish8 wrote:
I would have picked "As" also. I understand that "like" is used for nouns and "As" is used for phrases, but what about the difference in meaning between these two sentences:

I play sports like Football, Basketball, and Golf
VS.
I play sports such as Football, Basketball, and Golf

One is describing a similarity (like) vs the other is giving specific examples (as). It's because of this reasoning why I chose E.


Hi there,

"Like" and "as" are used for comparison while "such as" is used to present examples.

I play sports like football, basketball, and golf.

I'm afraid this senetnce is not correct because here "like" has been used to present the kinds of sports "I" play. To present the examples of sports, we must use "such as". Hence, the second sentence with "such as" is perfect.
Also note that the first sentence cannot present comparison because that comparison does not convey logical meaning. Comparing "sports" with "football, golf, and basketball" is not logical. The fisrt senetnce means that "I" play sports in the same way "I" play "football, basketball, and golf". Comparison must always be logical.
Click on the link below to understand the correct usage of "like", "as", and "such as" in detail.
as-vs-like-correct-and-incorrect-usages-133950.html#p1092922

This article will clarify all your doubts.
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2012, 05:08
Expert's post
gmatsrirama wrote:
Why D & E are wrong?


Hi there,

(D) As with Ernest Hemingway's prose, Cormac McCarthy's: Incorrect. In this choice, role of "with" is unclear. What is it "with" EH's prose. This question is not answered.


(E) As that of Ernest Hemingway, the prose of Cormac McCarthy: Incorrect. When "as" is used for comparison, it is followed by either "a clause" or "a prepositional phrase". Here "as" is followed by a noun phrase.

Click on the following link for detailed explanation on the correct usage of "like", "as", and "such as" and solutions to questions that are similar to this one:
as-vs-like-correct-and-incorrect-usages-133950.html#p1092922

Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2012, 11:37
Straight C. The question tests parallelism: Hemingway's prose versus McCarthy's. Apples should be compared with apples, not oranges-- one can't compare Hemingway/McCarthy to a prose, as seen in the wrong answer choices.

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Re: Like Ernest Hemingway   [#permalink] 21 Jun 2012, 11:37
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