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like vs as

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Director
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like vs as [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2004, 21:31
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara PymтАЩs first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2004, 21:46
c??
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2004, 21:49
I bet it's A, and I think it's a very tough question.

They're testing an idiom that is used very infrequently. Each of the statements is absurd, but that's an idiom for you...

I'll be very interested if someone approaches this question without resorting to that explanation,
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2004, 22:03
(b) (c) are out, 'does not seem' is not required when 'does' will suffice,
(d) sounds funny does not ------- does

left with (a) and (e)

(e) would have been better if " unlike any apprentice work " or

Unlike an apprentice work, Pym's novel is .......

I would go for (A)

for unlike to work, the comparision between apprentice work and first novel should be worded differently

So (A) is my choice
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 00:43
This phenomenon, called contraponent processual modality(cf: Essays on Time Based Linguistic Analysis, OUP, by C.-J. Bailey), is akin to deponent verbs in Greek.

From the same book:

It translates/reads easily(semantical force of "translates/reads" = can be translated)
That liquid solidifies quickly
The door opened
The puppy laid down(contraponent lay)
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 04:09
:wall :wall :wall :fu
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 06:18
I vote for A.
The word "read" is not a transitive verb here. So "as" is inapropriate.
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 06:40
anandnk wrote:
I vote for A.
The word "read" is not a transitive verb here. So "as" is inapropriate.


The more I dig the more I get confused !

The following link
http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/ ... earch=read
has this entry

10. intransitive verb have qualities that affect understanding: to have particular characteristics that affect the way something is understood
In the original it reads as poetry rather than prose.

The above example uses "as" ?!
Answering the question bascially rest on eleminating the answer choices
that have "seem" in it.

Another side question?
Where would one use "seem" properly?
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 13:35
anandnk wrote:
The word "read" is not a transitive verb here.


It is a transitive verb here.
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 17:15
Not falling into complexity, I would rather say E final answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2004, 17:22
The official Answer is A.

I feel that there may be a subtle difference between
"not like" and "unlike". Do you guys also think so?
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2004, 21:07
Why is (a) a correct instead of (d)?

Thanks.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2004, 21:52
Seattle_76 wrote:
Why is (a) a correct instead of (d)?

Thanks.


In choice D "it does not read like an apprentice work does",
like is a preposition and should be followed by noun whereas
"as" is a conjunction that should be used to connect two
clauses.

Answer D would be correct if it were to read "it does not read
like an apprentice work"
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2004, 22:08
Thanks (I recall this statement about like/as as well).

What the author wants to state is "X tastes like Y" - for example.

Would it be more clear to say "X tastes like Y tastes" or "X tastes like Y"?

My point is that - even "Y tastes" is still a noun phrase (I think) and does not violate the rule?

Thank.s
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Re: like vs as [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2004, 04:57
kpadma wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara PymтАЩs first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work


Try rewriting the sentence using simpler analogous words:

That concoction is Bill's first attempt at an artificial sweetener, but it does not taste like sugar.

This leads me to believe that answer is A.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2004, 05:19
Again I would like to reiterate. Here the comparison is about the attribute of two novels or books and not the actions. One has to use like/unlike to compare the attributes. The book itself cannot read.
The word "read" is similar to the word "sound" in "that sentence does not sound good to my ears"
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Re: like vs as [#permalink] New post 01 Nov 2010, 11:24
Maybe I'm gonna ask a stupid thing but how can a novel read?
Thanks for the clarification.

AkamaiBrah wrote:
kpadma wrote:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara PymтАЩs first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work


Try rewriting the sentence using simpler analogous words:

That concoction is Bill's first attempt at an artificial sweetener, but it does not taste like sugar.

This leads me to believe that answer is A.

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Re: like vs as [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2011, 10:15
I think like is used ,because similar in behavior read and apprentice work.
Re: like vs as   [#permalink] 01 Jan 2011, 10:15
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