Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 02 Oct 2014, 04:33

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 0

Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2005, 18:54
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the American Revolution (1775-1783), an ideology of "republican motherhood" resulted in a surge of educational opportunities for women in the United States. Kerber maintained that the leaders of the new nation wanted women to be educated in order to raise politically virtuous sons. A virtuous citizenry was considered essential to the success of the country's republican form of government; virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, where the mother's role was crucial. Thus, according to Kerber, motherhood became pivotal to the fate of the republic, providing justification for an unprecedented attention to female education.
Introduction of the republican motherhood thesis dramatically changed historiography. Prior to Kerber's work, educational historians barely mentioned women and girls; Thomas Woody's 1929 work is the notable exception. Examining newspaper advertisements for academies, Woody found that educational opportunities increased for both girls and boys around 1750. Pointing to "An Essay on Woman"(1753) as reflecting a shift in view, Woody also claimed that practical education for females had many advocates before the Revolution. Woody's evidence challenges the notion that the Revolution changed attitudes regarding female education, although it may have accelerated earlier trends. Historians' reliance on Kerber's "republican motherhood" thesis may have obscured the presence of these trends, making it difficult to determine to what extent the Revolution really changed women's lives.

1) According to the passage, within the field of educational history, Thomas Woody's 1929 work was
A.innovative because it relied on newspaper advertisements as evidence
B.exceptional in that it concentrated on the period before the American Revolution
C.unusual in that it focused on educational attitudes rather than on educational practices
D.controversial in its claims regarding educational opportunities for boys
E.atypical in that it examined the education of girls

2) According to the passage, Kerber argued that political leaders thought that the form of government adopted by the United States after the American Revolution depended on which of the following for its success?
A.Women assuming the sole responsibility for instilling political virtue in children
B.Girls becoming the primary focus of a reformed educational system that emphasized political virtue
C.The family serving as one of the primary means by which children were imbued with political virtue
D.The family assuming many of the functions previously performed by schools and churches
E.Men and women assuming equal responsibility for the management of schools, churches, and the family

3) The passage suggests that, with regard to the history of women's education in the United States, Kerber's work differs from Woody's primarily concerning which of the following?
A.The extent to which women were interested in pursuing educational opportunities in the eighteenth century
B.The extent of the support for educational opportunities for girls prior to the American Revolution
C.The extent of public resistance to educational opportunities for women after the American Revolution
D.Whether attitudes toward women's educational opportunities changed during the eighteenth century
E.Whether women needed to be educated in order to contribute to the success of a republican form of government

No OAs - the most convincing answers will be the OAs!
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 09 Jun 2005
Posts: 100
Location: New York
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2005, 19:15
E
C
B
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 284
Location: CA, USA
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2005, 20:16
1. A -> not the primary focus C-> not mentioned
D -> not about boys E -> not specific

my choice:
B.exceptional in that it concentrated on the period before the American Revolution

2.

Paragraph 1 says: "... virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, ...", meaning the job will now be taken over by families

my choice:
D.The family assuming many of the functions previously performed by schools and churches

3.

B.The extent of the support for educational opportunities for girls prior to the American Revolution
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 1736
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 0

Re: RC: Kerber's work [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2005, 21:41
1. E. a typical in that it examined the education of girls.

2. C. The family serving as one of the primary means by which children were imbued with political virtue

3. D. Whether attitudes toward women's educational opportunities changed during the eighteenth century
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 1736
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2005, 16:36
OA???????????
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 167
Location: Atlanta , GA
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2005, 19:22
Vithal says there are no OAs for this RC..
but I agree with you Himalaya on all the anwer choices( ACs :wink: )!!
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 1736
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2005, 20:53
shalinikhatri wrote:
Vithal says there are no OAs for this RC..
but I agree with you Himalaya on all the anwer choices( ACs :wink: )!!


:) hmmmmmmmmmm. oh, yes. :P
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2005, 21:59
Himalaya: I agree with the first two, can you justify D for the third?

IMO: from line 1 and line 6(from the end), D is definitely out. I am with B on the third
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 92
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 14 Jun 2005, 01:43
i also think B should be the answer to the last question
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2008
Posts: 24
Schools: MIT Sloan, BU School of Management
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: RC: Kerber's work [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2009, 01:10
Vithal wrote:
Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the American Revolution (1775-1783), an ideology of "republican motherhood" resulted in a surge of educational opportunities for women in the United States. Kerber maintained that the leaders of the new nation wanted women to be educated in order to raise politically virtuous sons. A virtuous citizenry was considered essential to the success of the country's republican form of government; virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, where the mother's role was crucial. Thus, according to Kerber, motherhood became pivotal to the fate of the republic, providing justification for an unprecedented attention to female education.
Introduction of the republican motherhood thesis dramatically changed historiography. Prior to Kerber's work, educational historians barely mentioned women and girls; Thomas Woody's 1929 work is the notable exception. Examining newspaper advertisements for academies, Woody found that educational opportunities increased for both girls and boys around 1750. Pointing to "An Essay on Woman"(1753) as reflecting a shift in view, Woody also claimed that practical education for females had many advocates before the Revolution. Woody's evidence challenges the notion that the Revolution changed attitudes regarding female education, although it may have accelerated earlier trends. Historians' reliance on Kerber's "republican motherhood" thesis may have obscured the presence of these trends, making it difficult to determine to what extent the Revolution really changed women's lives.

2) According to the passage, Kerber argued that political leaders thought that the form of government adopted by the United States after the American Revolution depended on which of the following for its success?
A.Women assuming the sole responsibility for instilling political virtue in children
B.Girls becoming the primary focus of a reformed educational system that emphasized political virtue
C.The family serving as one of the primary means by which children were imbued with political virtue
D.The family assuming many of the functions previously performed by schools and churches
E.Men and women assuming equal responsibility for the management of schools, churches, and the family

No OAs - the most convincing answers will be the OAs!


Actually, the OA for this question is C, according the material in my hand.
_________________

Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. ----Russell

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2009
Posts: 486
Location: Bangalore,India
WE 1: 4yrs in IT Industry
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 108 [0], given: 336

Re: RC: Kerber's work [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2009, 16:27
ECB are convincing
_________________

One Final Try.......

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 17 Jan 2010
Posts: 33
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 8

Re: RC: Kerber's work [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2010, 07:05
So what's the answer for the 1st Q?

Is it B or E?

IMO it's E
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Oct 2009
Posts: 33
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 2

Re: RC: Kerber's work [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2010, 01:41
i think its BCB .. pls post OA
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Dec 2010
Posts: 86
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 2

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2011, 20:31
OAs are B C B , as mentioned in other sites.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2009
Posts: 313
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 79 [0], given: 20

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2011, 09:20
I got C C B
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2009
Posts: 313
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 79 [0], given: 20

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2012, 03:50
Vithal wrote:
Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the American Revolution (1775-1783), an ideology of "republican motherhood" resulted in a surge of educational opportunities for women in the United States. Kerber maintained that the leaders of the new nation wanted women to be educated in order to raise politically virtuous sons. A virtuous citizenry was considered essential to the success of the country's republican form of government; virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, where the mother's role was crucial. Thus, according to Kerber, motherhood became pivotal to the fate of the republic, providing justification for an unprecedented attention to female education.
Introduction of the republican motherhood thesis dramatically changed historiography. Prior to Kerber's work, educational historians barely mentioned women and girls; Thomas Woody's 1929 work is the notable exception. Examining newspaper advertisements for academies, Woody found that educational opportunities increased for both girls and boys around 1750. Pointing to "An Essay on Woman"(1753) as reflecting a shift in view, Woody also claimed that practical education for females had many advocates before the Revolution. Woody's evidence challenges the notion that the Revolution changed attitudes regarding female education, although it may have accelerated earlier trends. Historians' reliance on Kerber's "republican motherhood" thesis may have obscured the presence of these trends, making it difficult to determine to what extent the Revolution really changed women's lives.

1) According to the passage, within the field of educational history, Thomas Woody's 1929 work was
A.innovative because it relied on newspaper advertisements as evidence
B.exceptional in that it concentrated on the period before the American Revolution
C.unusual in that it focused on educational attitudes rather than on educational practices
D.controversial in its claims regarding educational opportunities for boys
E.atypical in that it examined the education of girls

2) According to the passage, Kerber argued that political leaders thought that the form of government adopted by the United States after the American Revolution depended on which of the following for its success?
A.Women assuming the sole responsibility for instilling political virtue in children
B.Girls becoming the primary focus of a reformed educational system that emphasized political virtue
C.The family serving as one of the primary means by which children were imbued with political virtue
D.The family assuming many of the functions previously performed by schools and churches
E.Men and women assuming equal responsibility for the management of schools, churches, and the family

3) The passage suggests that, with regard to the history of women's education in the United States, Kerber's work differs from Woody's primarily concerning which of the following?
A.The extent to which women were interested in pursuing educational opportunities in the eighteenth century
B.The extent of the support for educational opportunities for girls prior to the American Revolution
C.The extent of public resistance to educational opportunities for women after the American Revolution
D.Whether attitudes toward women's educational opportunities changed during the eighteenth century
E.Whether women needed to be educated in order to contribute to the success of a republican form of government

No OAs - the most convincing answers will be the OAs!


IMO answers are E, C and B.
The OA's according to the material I have are E, C and A.

Can anyone explain if the answer to the third question can be A?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Mar 2012
Posts: 370
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 105 [0], given: 31

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2012, 19:32
imo
E
C
B
i guess the OA for this question is still in controversy, experts please throw some light
_________________

Practice Practice and practice...!!

If my reply /analysis is helpful-->please press KUDOS
If there's a loophole in my analysis--> suggest measures to make it airtight.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Aug 2012
Posts: 170
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 7

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2013, 03:46
My choices will be E C B ...
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2012
Posts: 39
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 14

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2013, 12:54
Hi, I was undecided with the number two, I pick D because C talked about POLITICAL virtue instead the text talked just about virtue, so I'm not sure that it is correct.
Can someone explain the possible difference between political virtue and virtue please?!
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Current Student
User avatar
Status: Making every effort to create original content for you!!
Joined: 23 Dec 2010
Posts: 490
Location: United States
Concentration: Healthcare, Social Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V34
GMAT 2: 750 Q49 V42
Followers: 253

Kudos [?]: 955 [1] , given: 82

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2013, 13:35
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
IanSolo wrote:
Hi, I was undecided with the number two, I pick D because C talked about POLITICAL virtue instead the text talked just about virtue, so I'm not sure that it is correct.
Can someone explain the possible difference between political virtue and virtue please?!


Hi IanSolo,

Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the American Revolution (1775-1783), an ideology of "republican motherhood" resulted in a surge of educational opportunities for women in the United States. Kerber maintained that the leaders of the new nation wanted women to be educated in order to raise politically virtuous sons. A virtuous citizenry was considered essential to the success of the country's republican form of government; virtue was to be instilled not only by churches and schools, but by families, where the mother's role was crucial. Thus, according to Kerber, motherhood became pivotal to the fate of the republic, providing justification for an unprecedented attention to female education.

We can derive the answer from the first paragraph. The question asks that according to Kerber what did political leaders thought to be the idea on which post American Revolution government depended.

If you read answer choice (D) the meaning is very broad "The family assuming many of the functions previously performed by schools and churches". i.e. families may be performing functions previously performed by churches, but the choice does not say that families along with churches instill political virtue in children. The passage says "not only by churches, but by families", which means that both are responsible for instilling virtue. Moreover, leaders did not thought that families assuming the functions of churches will benefit the republican form of government.

(C) States clearly that families are one of the primary agents that instill political virtue; Kerber says the same thing in the first paragraph.

As per the context of the passage "Political Virtue" an "Virtue" mean more or less the same thing, but this differentiation will not come in your way in answering this question.

Hope that helps,

Vercules
_________________

Press Kudos if you want to say thanks

Ultimate Reading Comprehension Encyclopedia | Ultimate Sentence Correction Encyclopedia | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- VERBAL | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- IR

Please Read and Follow the 9 Rules of Posting in Verbal Forum

Re: Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the   [#permalink] 15 Feb 2013, 13:35
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Argue For wininblue 3 03 May 2011, 03:24
2 In the early to mid-1980s, a business practice known as a agold 12 13 May 2008, 21:15
Linda Kerber argued in the mid- 1980's that after the JCLEONES 0 14 Jan 2008, 15:33
Linda Kerber argued in the mid- 1980's that after the bkk145 19 08 Oct 2007, 16:24
In the decade from the mid-1980's to the mid-1990's, large gmataquaguy 18 03 Aug 2005, 03:27
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Linda Kerber argued in the mid-1980's that after the

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 24 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.