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Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n

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Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 17:24
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A
B
C
D
E

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67% (01:01) correct 33% (00:00) wrong based on 4 sessions
Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n less than the slope of line p?
(1) Line n and p intersect at point (5,1)
(2) The y intercept of line n is greater than the y- intercept of line p
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Re: DS: line n and p [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 18:10
dinesh8 wrote:
Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n less than the slope of line p?
(1) Line n and p intersect at point (5,1)
(2) The y intercept of line n is greater than the y- intercept of line p


C?
1. alone doesnt give us much info, ie slope.
2. taking 2 alone still does surve the much.

taking both we know the common point, and since y-int of n is greater its slope is always less steepler or more negaive. so C.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 18:51
I am getting E..

What is both the slopes are negative? The one with larger incercept will have a larger slope!

But in case both are positive, the one with smaller intercept will have larger slope.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:05
sm176811 wrote:
I am getting E..

What is both the slopes are negative? The one with larger incercept will have a larger slope!

But in case both are positive, the one with smaller intercept will have larger slope.


if both r negative, the one with larger y-int will have a larger negative slope. If a slope is more more negative, wouldn't that make it smaller? I know from a steepness point of view its not true. Please correct me, as I am little unsure. thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:09
Yeah, more -ve is smaller

Any number (in the negative range), the more netaive it is, the smaller it is!
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:15
sm176811 wrote:
Yeah, more -ve is smaller

Any number (in the negative range), the more netaive it is, the smaller it is!


Thanks, so n will always have a smaller slope then p, therefore C. rite?
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:20
shampoo wrote:
sm176811 wrote:
Yeah, more -ve is smaller

Any number (in the negative range), the more netaive it is, the smaller it is!


Thanks, so n will always have a smaller slope then p, therefore C. rite?


Well for both +ve, n is smaller, both -ve n is larger!
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:41
sm176811 wrote:
shampoo wrote:
sm176811 wrote:
Yeah, more -ve is smaller

Any number (in the negative range), the more netaive it is, the smaller it is!


Thanks, so n will always have a smaller slope then p, therefore C. rite?


Well for both +ve, n is smaller, both -ve n is larger!


I disagree, I think n will always be smaller, since the y-int is lesser.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 May 2006, 19:45
shampoo wrote:
sm176811 wrote:
shampoo wrote:
sm176811 wrote:
Yeah, more -ve is smaller

Any number (in the negative range), the more netaive it is, the smaller it is!


Thanks, so n will always have a smaller slope then p, therefore C. rite?


Well for both +ve, n is smaller, both -ve n is larger!


I disagree, I think n will always be smaller, since the y-int is lesser.


Then again when I think abut that slope=steepness of a line in that case the answer should be E.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 May 2006, 07:48
Anyone else wanna comment on this?

What is the OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 08 May 2006, 11:50
I think it's (C)

1) giving y = a(p)*x + b(p) and y = a(n)*x + b(n)

we have :
1= 5*a(p) + b(p)
1= 5*a(n) + b(n)

Not sufficient

2) is b(n) > b(p)

combining (1) and (2)

we have : 1-5*a(n) > 1-5*a(p)

which means : a(n) < a(p)
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 [#permalink] New post 08 May 2006, 12:18
Let N be : y= m1x+ c1
Let P be : y= m2x + c2

From 1st stmt, 1 = 5m1 + c1 ; 1 = 5m2 + c2
Hence, m1-m2 = (c2-c1)/5.

Insuff since we don't know the reln between c1 and c2.

From 2nd stmt, c1>c2. Insuff.

Combining, m1 - m2 < 0 -> m1 < m2

Hence, (C).
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 [#permalink] New post 09 May 2006, 08:09
it have to be C.
Since they intersect on the 1st quadrant. One is rising faster than the other one.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 May 2006, 12:26
The OA is C - I got this question on the GMATPrep test.

It still puzzles me a bit, though - I also think about that option when the y-intercepts of n and p are both positive.

Lets take point (0,4) as y-intersept of n, and point (0,3) as y-intersept of p

The slope of n is 4-1/0-5=-3/5=-0.6

The slope of p is 3-1/0-5=-2/5=-0.4

BUT -0.6>-0.4 IS NOT TRUE!!!

Can someone figure out this discrepancy and explain it in terms of real numbers, not formulas?

Thanks a lot in advance!
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 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2006, 00:03
luxmaria wrote:
The OA is C - I got this question on the GMATPrep test.

It still puzzles me a bit, though - I also think about that option when the y-intercepts of n and p are both positive.

Lets take point (0,4) as y-intersept of n, and point (0,3) as y-intersept of p

The slope of n is 4-1/0-5=-3/5=-0.6

The slope of p is 3-1/0-5=-2/5=-0.4

BUT -0.6>-0.4 IS NOT TRUE!!!

Can someone figure out this discrepancy and explain it in terms of real numbers, not formulas?

Thanks a lot in advance!


The questions asks "Is the slope of line n less than the slope of line p?"

Based on your number, -0.6 IS smaller than -0.4, so the answer is YES, C is sufficient
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 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2006, 06:26
Thank you TeHCM!

:oops:

How could I not see that? :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2006, 10:30
still no OA :?

IMO E
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 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2006, 10:37
Has to be C.

This is one of the questions that you would get in a flash if you drew a rough diagram :idea:
  [#permalink] 12 May 2006, 10:37
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