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Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n

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Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n [#permalink] New post 11 Nov 2006, 12:28
Lines n and p lie in the xy-plane. Is the slope of line n less than the slope of line p?

(1) Lines n and p intersect at the point (5,1)
(2) The y-intercept of line n is greater than the y-intercept of line p.

I keep ending up with answer E - both statements together are not sufficient. However, this is not the correct answer.

Here's my work, using the equation for a line, y = Mx + B, where M is slope and B is y-intercept.

(1) 5 * Mn + Bn = 5 * Mp + Bp
Not sufficient

(2) Obviously not sufficient

(1 & 2 together) 5 * Mn + Bn = 5 * Mp + Bp
Simplifying this equation gives:
Mp / Mn = Bn - Bp

So, to know if slope of line n is less than slope of line p, we have to know whether the left hand side of this equation is greater than 1. For it to be greater than 1, Bn has to be at least 1 greater than Bp, but we don't know that for sure. We only know that Bn is greater than Bp, not to what extent.

Where am I going wrong here?
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 22:13
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josh478 wrote:
I have a question about this:

I don't get the algebraic method.. however I was thinking that if the points intersect, then the line originating higher, or sufficiently lower than the other would result in a greater slope (assuming the slope can be positive or negative). But, if the y intercept for n is +1 and the y intercept for point P is -5, isnt the slope greater for P?

At first it was straight C, until I drew a picture on my scrap paper and realized that a higher Y intercept doesn't seem to necessarily mean a greater slope.

I am going wrong somewhere!! Help!

Here is the algebraic method
each statement is individually insuff.
Combining we get
Let the eq of two lines be y1=m1x1+c1 and y2=m2x2+c2
Now the pt (5,1) lies on both lines so must satisfy the above equations
1=5m1+c1 1=5m2+c2 thus 5m1+c1=5m2+c2 ...A
From two we get c1 >c2...B
From A and B m1<m2 ..thus suff
Hence the answer is C
Hope this helps.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Nov 2006, 12:46
The answer is (C) :)

By a physics reasonning:
As both lines pass by the same point (5,1) and as the slope represents the constant acceleration or deceleration between 2 points, we can see now that if each line passes by a second point that differs for both lines and that is defined by a rule such as Y interceptor of n > Y interceptor of n, we can conclude on the way that the 2 slopes are related one another.

By the mathematical approach:
o For the line n : y = a(n)*x+b(n)
o For the line p : y = a(p)*x+b(p)

We know from (2) that b(n) > b(p)

and we have as well:
o 1 = a(n)*5+b(n)
<=> b(n) = 1-5*a(n)

o 1 = a(p)*5+b(p)
<=> b(p) = 1-5*a(p)

Thus,
1-*5a(n) > 1-5*a(p)
<=> a(p) > a(n)

SUFF.
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Slope [#permalink] New post 11 Nov 2006, 13:04
Ahhh...yep, I see it now. The answer via physical reasoning is the best way for me to look at it.

Thanks,
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Nov 2006, 13:28
artshep

You can also draw the lines on the x-y plane and find out that the slope of line n is always greater than that of line p (when both slopes are either negative or positive) if you take both statements together.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2006, 15:51
I have a question about this:

I don't get the algebraic method.. however I was thinking that if the points intersect, then the line originating higher, or sufficiently lower than the other would result in a greater slope (assuming the slope can be positive or negative). But, if the y intercept for n is +1 and the y intercept for point P is -5, isnt the slope greater for P?

At first it was straight C, until I drew a picture on my scrap paper and realized that a higher Y intercept doesn't seem to necessarily mean a greater slope.

I am going wrong somewhere!! Help!
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2006, 17:08
I think we have to assume it is saying that using both together the slope of line n will be less positive than that of line p.

Otherwise, if we were simply looking at absolute value of slope then the slope of line n could be more or less than that of line p.
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Slope [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2006, 19:41
Can anyone please tell me, if there are 2 slopes with values 1 & -3, which one is greater?
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Re: Slope [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2006, 19:44
mitul wrote:
Can anyone please tell me, if there are 2 slopes with values 1 & -3, which one is greater?


You got to tell us greater in what?
Gradient,slope, intercept y, intercept x?
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Slope [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 18:12
Sorry Guys,

Let me rephrase my question

If Y intercept of one Line is 3
and Y intercept of another line = -10

Which Y intercept would be greater -10(which is negative) or 3(which is positive)
Slope   [#permalink] 11 Dec 2006, 18:12
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