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Low Yield Cigarettes

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Manager
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Low Yield Cigarettes [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2007, 21:58
Switching to "low-yield" cigarettes, those that yield less nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide than regular ciga-rettes. When tested on a standard machine, does not, in general, reduce the incidence of heart attack. This results is surprising, since nicotine and carbon monoxide have been implicated as contributing to heart disease.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy?

(A) Smoking low-yield cigarettes has become fashionable, as relatively healthier styles of life have become more popular than those that have been identified as risky.
(B) For those who are themselves smokers, inhaling the smoke of others is not generally a significant factor contributing to an increased risk of heart disease.
(C) Nicotine does not contribute as much as to heart disease as does carbon monoxide.
(D) Carbon monoxide and cigarette tar are not addictive substances.
(E) People who switch from high-yield to low-yield cigarettes often compensate by increasing the number and depth of puffs in order to maintain their accustomed nicotine level.

CB
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2007, 22:34
Clear E.
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Re: Low Yield Cigarettes [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2007, 22:54
computer-bot wrote:
Switching to "low-yield" cigarettes, those that yield less nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide than regular cigarettes when tested on a standard machine, does not, in general, reduce the incidence of heart attack. This results is surprising, since nicotine and carbon monoxide have been implicated as contributing to heart disease.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy?

(A) Smoking low-yield cigarettes has become fashionable, as relatively healthier styles of life have become more popular than those that have been identified as risky.
(B) For those who are themselves smokers, inhaling the smoke of others is not generally a significant factor contributing to an increased risk of heart disease.
(C) Nicotine does not contribute as much as to heart disease as does carbon monoxide.
(D) Carbon monoxide and cigarette tar are not addictive substances.
(E) People who switch from high-yield to low-yield cigarettes often compensate by increasing the number and depth of puffs in order to maintain their accustomed nicotine level.


E. straight and clear.................

suppose if:

consumption when high nicotine and other harmful substances - 1 pkt
consumption when low nicotine and other harmful substances - 2 pkt

so not changes in heart attack.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2007, 23:05
Only E explains how the consumption of nicotine and carbon monoxide can remain at the same level or increase even with the "low-yield" cigarettes.
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Re: Low Yield Cigarettes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2007, 07:16
computer-bot wrote:
Switching to "low-yield" cigarettes, those that yield less nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide than regular ciga-rettes. When tested on a standard machine, does not, in general, reduce the incidence of heart attack. This results is surprising, since nicotine and carbon monoxide have been implicated as contributing to heart disease.

Which one of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy?

(A) Smoking low-yield cigarettes has become fashionable, as relatively healthier styles of life have become more popular than those that have been identified as risky.
(B) For those who are themselves smokers, inhaling the smoke of others is not generally a significant factor contributing to an increased risk of heart disease.
(C) Nicotine does not contribute as much as to heart disease as does carbon monoxide.
(D) Carbon monoxide and cigarette tar are not addictive substances.
(E) People who switch from high-yield to low-yield cigarettes often compensate by increasing the number and depth of puffs in order to maintain their accustomed nicotine level.

CB


Definitely E.
My own answer was something else cause the heart attack other than tar, nicotine, and co. However, this is not the answer. But same amount of puffs = same amount of all substances = same risk of heart attack.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2007, 11:07
This is a big confusing, because the statement says that it is tested on a "machine" which seems to indicate that puffs and intake would be standardized. Therefore an answer should indicate that the quantity of nicotine and tar in a cigarette is irrelevant, the consistent exposure to such elements is enough.

Therefore I pick B, which indicates that the type of smoke inhaled by smokers in irrelevant, the only relevence is that they are all smokers.

If the statement was about a test on humans and the behavior of their smoking, then I would choose E.

Cannot figure out what is ment by Machine
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2007, 11:32
I also not clear the use of "Machine" in the passage. But only E seems correct here.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2007, 19:23
I agree with defenestrate.

The machine made me confusing too. But if you study all the 5 options, E looks more better than rest of the options. So I would have marked E if get this question in GMAT.
  [#permalink] 07 Oct 2007, 19:23
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