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Malsenia sales of classical records

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Malsenia sales of classical records [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 13:14
In Malsenia sales of classical records are soaring. The buyers responsible for this boom are quite new to classical music and were drawn to it either by classical scores from television commercials or by theme tunes introducing major sports events on television. Audiences at classical concerts, however, are continually shrinking in Malsenia. It can be concluded from this that the new Malsenian converts to classical music, having initially experienced this music as recorded music, are most comfortable with classical music as recorded music and really have no desire to hear live performances.

The argument assumes which one of the following?

(A) To sell well in Malsenia, a classical record must include at least one piece familiar from television.

(B) At least some of the new Malsenian buyers of classical records have available to them the opinion of attending classical concerts.

(C) The number of classical concerts performed in Malsenia has not decreased in response to smaller audiences.

(D) The classical records available in Malsenia are, for the most part, not recordings of actual public concerts.

(E) Classical concerts in Malsenia are not limited to music that is readily available on recordings.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 13:24
E. Negate E and the argument falls. Conclusion says that new converts are most comfortable with classical music as recorded music. But if classical concerts are also available on CD, or whatever other means, then the argument does not stand
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 13:43
Paul wrote:
E. Negate E and the argument falls. Conclusion says that new converts are most comfortable with classical music as recorded music. But if classical concerts are also available on CD, or whatever other means, then the argument does not stand


I would say that negating the choice E will actually support the conclusion. If you negate E, that will give you the following:

Classical concerts in Malsenia ARE limited to music that is readily available on recordings.

Now passage says that the audience is shrinking for the concerts. Negating E will say that music in concerts is subset of music on records. So if the audience in concerts is shrinking, that will in fact support the conclusion that people are comfortable listening to records in place of concerts.

Anyhow E is not the answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 14:56
True, negating E will support the conclusion. :wall The answer should be D because if you negate it and say that recordings of classical music ARE actual recordings of classical concerts, then you cannot conclude that people will prefer classical music over live performance. :stupid2
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:03
Paul wrote:
True, negating E will support the conclusion. :wall The answer should be D because if you negate it and say that recordings of classical music ARE actual recordings of classical concerts, then you cannot conclude that people will prefer classical music over live performance. :stupid2


Nop...The negation of D will again support the conclusion. With the negation, D becomes: recordings of classical music ARE actual recordings of classical concerts. The passage suggest that the audience is shrinking at the concerts and therfore people prefere records over concerts.

One more try?...
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:09
Ok, this is ridiculous. I am flabbergasted. Someone, save my soul! :die
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:18
C.

If the number of concerts have decreased then it could be the reason for lower number of people attending the concerts. But, since the author is ruling out any other reason for the decline, it has to be assumed that the concerts have not decreased.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:19
B?? but this is rather an inference, not an assumption.

author says "audience is most comfortable with classical music as recorded music and really have no desire to hear live performances.." , so they might have have the information beforehand.

If this is wrong, then I am gonna get this wrong on the real test :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:21
One of them is gonna join my league at least. I think I am getting this question all wrong because clearly, negating my choices support the conclusion, and we want the opposite :stupid2
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 15:23
C seems promising indeed
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 16:05
asandeep wrote:
C.

If the number of concerts have decreased then it could be the reason for lower number of people attending the concerts. But, since the author is ruling out any other reason for the decline, it has to be assumed that the concerts have not decreased.


Though the official answer is C, it does not make sense.

Even if number of concerts have decreased, it does not provide a reason for the shrinking audience. The passage has the following sentence:

"Audiences at classical concerts, however, are continually shrinking in Malsenia". The first hand meaning of this could be that the audience at each of the concerts is shrinking. (and not that the TOTAL audience for concerts in Malsenia was shrinking. If we derive this meaning, then your reasoning could be correct)

Furthermore, look at the wording of C closely.

The number of classical concerts performed in Malsenia has not decreased in response to smaller audiences.

The BOLD part is imporatant. It suggests that the reduction in audience has ALREADY occured first and in response to that, the number of concert has not reduced. If the reduction in audience has taken place first, what was the reason for that reduction?

To be correct, I think this choice should have been written as follows:

"The lower number of concerts has not lead to the shrinking audience"

I answered this question with B.

My reasoning was: Choice B inicate that the new audience was recommended to attend the concerts, and inspite of that the audience is shrinking at the concerts. So this basically supports the conclusion.

Another way of looking at it would be, negating the choice. If you negate choice B, it would result in : None of the new records buyer were recommended/informed about attending the concerts. So that can provide the alternative explanation for the shrinking concert audience. So the argument "new people are more comfortable with records because there is a shrinking audience at the concerts" does not stand. IN fact, it becomes " the new people are more comfirtable with records because they have not been recommended/informed about attending the concerts".

I would like to invite other comments. The official answer could be wrong.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 16:08
C seems dubious. You cannot ascertain the size of the audience based on the number of concerts without knowing whether the number of people going to concerts has increased/decreased.

For example, the total number of people going to concerts could have actually increased but the audience can remain small if the number of concerts have increased as well.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 16:24
gmatblast I had chosen B also.

C doesn't seem to be the answer. If the number of concerts actually decreased because of smaller audiences the argument still could be valid. That is the new listeners could still hate going to concerts. There is no relation between one and the other.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 16:28
gmatblast wrote:
asandeep wrote:
C.

If the number of concerts have decreased then it could be the reason for lower number of people attending the concerts. But, since the author is ruling out any other reason for the decline, it has to be assumed that the concerts have not decreased.


Though the official answer is C, it does not make sense.

Even if number of concerts have decreased, it does not provide a reason for the shrinking audience. The passage has the following sentence:

"Audiences at classical concerts, however, are continually shrinking in Malsenia". The first hand meaning of this could be that the audience at each of the concerts is shrinking. (and not that the TOTAL audience for concerts in Malsenia was shrinking. If we derive this meaning, then your reasoning could be correct)

Furthermore, look at the wording of C closely.

The number of classical concerts performed in Malsenia has not decreased in response to smaller audiences.

The BOLD part is imporatant. It suggests that the reduction in audience has ALREADY occured first and in response to that, the number of concert has not reduced. If the reduction in audience has taken place first, what was the reason for that reduction?

To be correct, I think this choice should have been written as follows:

"The lower number of concerts has not lead to the shrinking audience"

I answered this question with B.

My reasoning was: Choice B inicate that the new audience was recommended to attend the concerts, and inspite of that the audience is shrinking at the concerts. So this basically supports the conclusion.

Another way of looking at it would be, negating the choice. If you negate choice B, it would result in : None of the new records buyer were recommended/informed about attending the concerts. So that can provide the alternative explanation for the shrinking concert audience. So the argument "new people are more comfortable with records because there is a shrinking audience at the concerts" does not stand. IN fact, it becomes " the new people are more comfirtable with records because they have not been recommended/informed about attending the concerts".

I would like to invite other comments. The official answer could be wrong.


You supported choice C wihtout even realizing it.
Consider this ---

[qoute]
The number of classical concerts performed in Malsenia has not decreased in response to smaller audiences.

The BOLD part is imporatant. It suggests that the reduction in audience has ALREADY occured first and in response to that, the number of concert has not reduced. If the reduction in audience has taken place first, what was the reason for that reduction?
[/qoute]

As you said, the audience has already reduced. But, if the number of concerts has not reduced then, the attributes of the concerts e.g quality, variety etc. has not changed. This means that the concerts are not responsible for the reduced audience someting else is responsible. What could be ? The conclusion gives you the reason....people are not interested in concerts.
Thus, among all options only C supports the argument and also breaks the argument if negated.

Let us negate C and see --
It will say, "The number of concerts HAS reduced in response to lower number of audience".
Here, the cause-and-affect relation cannot be established correctly.
It is not possible to determine if the concerts reduced due to reduced audience OR the audience reduced due to reduced concerts. Thus, negating C does not support the argument. Although, it does not refute it completely.


As for B, the conclusion says that "the new audience do not have interest in attending concerts". Whether people have the option to attend concerts or do not have the option, it does not change the conclusion.
An assumption, if negated, should break the argument.
If it is known that all the people do not have the option to attend concerts, does that mean they have no desire to attend one ?????
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 17:45
asandeep,

Let us forget about the wording part of choice C. Do you agree with the following part from my earlier post? (I think Iewser has also pointed out the same thing)

Even if number of concerts have decreased, it does not provide a reason for the shrinking audience. The passage has the following sentence:

"Audiences at classical concerts, however, are continually shrinking in Malsenia". The first hand meaning of this could be that the audience at each of the concerts is shrinking. (and not that the TOTAL audience for concerts in Malsenia was shrinking. If we derive this meaning, then your reasoning could be correct)


Also I think you misread the choice B. There is no word OPTION in choice B. It is about OPINION. Please reread the choice and then go through my reasoning for choice B again in my earlier post.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 17:53
Honestly, I would like you guys to rate this question in terms of difficulty on a scale of 1 to 5, 5 being the hardest. I would give it a 5
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2004, 18:12
Does this sentence make sense to you in the first place ?
Probably we should post it as a SC question..

At least some of the new Malsenian buyers of classical records have available to them the opinion of attending classical concerts.


The word "opinion" in the sentence HAS TO BE "option" to make any sense.

This question is from studa.com, correct ?
I personally don't trust the material on studa as far as grammer and choice of words go.[/b]
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 03:36
bumping this. I chose B.

How can C be right? IMO, the argument says the audiences in concerts (being conducted) are shrinking, and C seems like circular reasoning. Completely agree with gmatblast's reasoning.

Would anyone like to discuss?
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Re: Malsenia sales of classical records [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 06:22
gmatblast wrote:
In Malsenia sales of classical records are soaring. The buyers responsible for this boom are quite new to classical music and were drawn to it either by classical scores from television commercials or by theme tunes introducing major sports events on television. Audiences at classical concerts, however, are continually shrinking in Malsenia. It can be concluded from this that the new Malsenian converts to classical music, having initially experienced this music as recorded music, are most comfortable with classical music as recorded music and really have no desire to hear live performances.

The argument assumes which one of the following?

(A) To sell well in Malsenia, a classical record must include at least one piece familiar from television.

(B) At least some of the new Malsenian buyers of classical records have available to them the opinion of attending classical concerts.

(C) The number of classical concerts performed in Malsenia has not decreased in response to smaller audiences.

(D) The classical records available in Malsenia are, for the most part, not recordings of actual public concerts.

(E) Classical concerts in Malsenia are not limited to music that is readily available on recordings.


B must be true for the conclusion to be valid- if none of the new buyers have had the option of going to concerts, then their non-attendance is not due to a lack of desire. C is irrelevant
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2007, 06:47
I say B if the word is option not opinion.

If they did not have the option to attend the concert, then you cannot state that they did not want to go to live performances, they just couldnt for some reason.
  [#permalink] 12 Feb 2007, 06:47
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