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Many children ride their bicycles at night unpro-tected by

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Many children ride their bicycles at night unpro-tected by [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 11:44
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A
B
C
D
E

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Many children ride their bicycles at night unpro-tected by neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor headlights.

(A) neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor
(B) neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, or
(C) rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, or
(D) rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor
(E) either rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors or
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 11:51
Its a choice between C and E...

The very use of "unprotected" - indicates that use of a negation like "neither..nor" is not required....

I am not sure about whether we can use "Either..or" idiom in this way:
"Either X,Y or Z"....Guys is it possible??

So i am choosing C...
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 11:51
Many children ride their bicycles at night unpro-tected by neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor headlights.

(A) neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor
(B) neither rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, or
(C) rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, or
(D) rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, nor
(E) either rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors or

Usage of "neither ... nor"/"either ... or" shouldn't have "," inbetween?
So any option with nor or neither is eliminated.

Asnwer: C.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 11:52
C... it gives the list

Neither nor/either or are used for 2 things and we have 3
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Re: SC: Children [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 13:31
E.

I thought that GMAT does not test commas, colons, semi-colons, etc?
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Re: SC: Children [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 13:38
I thought and interpreted 'rudimentary safety equipment' to refer to reflectors and headlights. If so, then I think E makes sense.

If 'rudimentary safety equipment' is one of the three things, then C would make sense. I guess I misunderstood the statement.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 13:50
C.

don't use "neither..... nor" or "either ....or" for more than 2 things.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2006, 14:59
agree with ps_dahiya completely. neither-nor, either-or only applies to 2 items. C
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 00:31
Will go with C.

There is no need for neither/either here.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 12:03
Quote:
C... it gives the list.


very sweet. OA is C.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2006, 13:36
C it is... either... or is for comparison of two nouns...
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Re: SC: Children [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2006, 00:49
indasun wrote:
E.

I thought that GMAT does not test commas, colons, semi-colons, etc?


Rehash your thinking. GMAT often tests our understanding of such punctuation, especially within the context of succinct grammar.

This is a listing SC, so correct comma use is imperative. Agree with (C)
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Re: SC: Children [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2006, 09:41
GMATT73 wrote:
indasun wrote:
E.

I thought that GMAT does not test commas, colons, semi-colons, etc?


Rehash your thinking. GMAT often tests our understanding of such punctuation, especially within the context of succinct grammar.

This is a listing SC, so correct comma use is imperative. Agree with (C)


According to MGMAT, the GMAT does not test commas. They do however test semi-colon, colon, and the dash.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2006, 11:59
Tip of the post.

ps_dahiya wrote:
C.

don't use "neither.... nor" or "either ....or" for more than 2 things.


exactly.
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Re: SC: Children [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2006, 16:52
Futuristic wrote:
GMATT73 wrote:
indasun wrote:
E.

I thought that GMAT does not test commas, colons, semi-colons, etc?


Rehash your thinking. GMAT often tests our understanding of such punctuation, especially within the context of succinct grammar.

This is a listing SC, so correct comma use is imperative. Agree with (C)


According to MGMAT, the GMAT does not test commas. They do however test semi-colon, colon, and the dash.


I beg to differ. Read this info from testmagic and sentencecorrection.com:

That vs. Which
1. A testmagic tip: GMAT almost always (I say almost always because I've seen two questions that did not follow this rule, but the rule was violated in all five answer choices) wants you to put a comma before which. In other words, if you see which without a comma before it, it's probably wrong.

If the person you're talking to, or the person who's reading what you've written, needs that extra bit of information to know which noun you're referring to, we say that that extra information is non-restrictive. This word doesn't really describe the function clearly, so many teachers say that this information is “extra."

On the other hand, if you need that information to know which noun you are talking about, we say that the information is restrictive. Again, this word is not really a good choice for clarity, and many teachers use the term "necessary information" instead

We need a comma before non-restrictive clauses and phrases but it is not needed before restrictive clauses and phrases.

Both the sentences below are correct according to GMAT, but have different meanings.
• Please go into the room and get me the big book, which is mine. (Ex: of non-restrictive)
• Please go into the room and get me the big book that is mine. (Ex: of restrictive)
http://www.sentencecorrection.com/forum ... wtopic=150

Also, the correct positioning of commas are often tested on modifier and listing SCs.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2006, 22:32
C for me.

Neither X nor Y
Either ....or combination is wrong.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2006, 08:49
Didn't realize I had answered this before... :-)
Still C...
(C) rudimentary safety equipment, reflectors, or

Clearly C

"either .. or" generally usage is for two choices.
  [#permalink] 25 Aug 2006, 08:49
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