Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 19 Sep 2014, 11:48

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Many English adjectives, when included in questions,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Jan 2011
Posts: 244
Location: India
GMAT Date: 07-16-2012
GPA: 3.4
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 20 [1] , given: 25

Reviews Badge
Many English adjectives, when included in questions, [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 23:15
1
This post received
KUDOS
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

61% (02:27) correct 39% (01:12) wrong based on 123 sessions
Many English adjectives, when included in questions, indicate a bias although their opposites do not; for example, questions beginning with "how close," a construction implying that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily carry the implication of long distance.

A although their opposites do not; for example, questions beginning with "how close," a construction implying that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily carry the implication of long distance

B unlike their opposites; for example, by beginning a question with "how close," speakers imply that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but they do not necessarily imply a long distance in beginning them with "how far."

C while their opposites do not; for instance, questions beginning with "how close" imply that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily imply a long distance.

D that their opposites lack; in the case of speakers who begin questions with "how close," for instance, it is implied that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but for those who begin questions with "how far" there is no corresponding implication of long distance.

E that their opposites do not; for instance, when speakers begin questions with "how close," implying that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but when they begin questions with "how far" a long distance is not necessarily implied.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

-------Analyze why option A in SC wrong-------

Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1074
Location: United States
Followers: 121

Kudos [?]: 1285 [0], given: 120

Premium Member
Re: Many English adjectives, when included in questions [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 00:51
Many English adjectives, when included in questions, indicate a bias although their opposites do not; for example, questions beginning with "how close," a construction implying that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily carry the implication of long distance.

A) although their opposites do not; for example, questions beginning with "how close," a construction implying that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily carry the implication of long distance
Wrong.
- The usage "although" is not correct.
- "implying" is not verb ==> should be "questions....imply"

B) unlike their opposites; for example, by beginning a question with "how close," speakers imply that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but they do not necessarily imply a long distance in beginning them with "how far."
Wrong.
- Comparison "bias" and "their opposites" is wrong.
- In addition, "them" is not correct.

C) while their opposites do not; for instance, questions beginning with "how close" imply that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily imply a long distance.
Correct.
- The usage of while conveys contrast meaning.
- S-V agreement in the second part is good.

D) that their opposites lack; in the case of speakers who begin questions with "how close," for instance, it is implied that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but for those who begin questions with "how far" there is no corresponding implication of long distance.
Wrong.
- "lack" changes meaning.
- "it" and "there is" in the second part are not parallel.

E) that their opposites do not; for instance, when speakers begin questions with "how close," implying that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but when they begin questions with "how far" a long distance is not necessarily implied.
Wrong.
- Structure in the second par is not parallel.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMV Chief of Design.

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
avatar
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 2266
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Followers: 263

Kudos [?]: 1613 [1] , given: 249

Re: Many English adjectives, when included in questions [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 00:57
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
A. although their opposites do not; for example, questions beginning with "how close," a construction implying that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily carry the implication of long distance --- The clause beginning with - “for example, questions beginning with and ending with discussion is nearby ” - is a fragment. It does not have a working verb;

B unlike their opposites; for example, by beginning a question with "how close," speakers imply that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but they do not necessarily imply a long distance in beginning them with "how far."--- Unlike their opposites. This is a wrong comparison, the choice compares what adjective do with their just their opposites and not what their opposites do. In addition the subordinate clause without reason shifts the focus to what speakers do rather than what adjectives do. This is a shift of intent.

C while their opposites do not; for instance, questions beginning with "how close" imply that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but those beginning with "how far" do not necessarily imply a long distance. --- proper comparison and parallelism. The right choice.

D that their opposites lack; in the case of speakers who begin questions with "how close," for instance, it is implied that whatever is under discussion is nearby, but for those who begin questions with "how far" there is no corresponding implication of long distance. --- comparing what the adjectives do with what their opposites lack; This is change of meaning. In addition the use of the preposition for those is rather unidiomatic in this context. It should be in tandem with “in the case of”

E that their opposites do not; for instance, when speakers begin questions with "how close," implying that whatever is being discussed is nearby, but when they begin questions with "how far", a long distance is not necessarily implied. --- The problem here is the use of when; Here when (in the meaning of while) denotes also contrast and a specific point. Thus, the use of ‘but’, another contrasting conjunction becomes redundant and mars the flow of the intended meaning.
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2012
Posts: 292
Location: United States
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
GMAT Date: 07-25-2013
GPA: 3.83
WE: Architecture (Computer Hardware)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 72 [0], given: 99

Re: Many English adjectives, when included in questions [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 03:59
How come one can identify implying is a verb or a modifier

If implying is alone alone then its a modifier and if used along with is implying then its a verb right?
_________________

"Giving kudos" is a decent way to say "Thanks" and motivate contributors. Please use them, it won't cost you anything

Expert Post
Retired Moderator
avatar
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 2266
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Followers: 263

Kudos [?]: 1613 [0], given: 249

Re: Many English adjectives, when included in questions [#permalink] New post 06 May 2013, 09:02
Expert's post
yes mostly; implying or anyother verb+ ing for thatImplying matter is a verb only when preceded by an auxiliary verb such as is, was, were etc Whe expressed along, any verb+ ing could be either a present participle or a gerund ( another kind of verbal noun , but not a verb}
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Re: Many English adjectives, when included in questions   [#permalink] 06 May 2013, 09:02
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Online English Practise Questions anudce 0 21 Jan 2014, 05:28
English question for natives nonameee 10 11 Jan 2011, 08:01
2 Exponents and English Words Question vladik210 2 13 Jan 2010, 21:51
At a certain college there are as many English majors as jdphenom316 3 24 Nov 2008, 08:32
Essay Question include or not? Ozmba 5 02 Jan 2007, 09:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Many English adjectives, when included in questions,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.